Do we have any physical therapists in here?

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by TQ, Aug 18, 2006.

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  1. TQ

    TQ OT Supporter

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    I'm thinking about changing my major and was looking for some insight :)

    What kind of money do you make? :x:
     
  2. cpz

    cpz I'm OG on and off OT

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    in for the answer. I was thinking about this a couple of days ago.
     
  3. Placebo

    Placebo New Member

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    I'm working on my degree in exercise science or kinesiology then I'm going to become a DPT.
     
  4. TQ

    TQ OT Supporter

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    DPT?
     
  5. cavefish

    cavefish You ain't a crook son, you just a shook one

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    Donkey Punch Technician.
     
  6. Abomb

    Abomb New Member

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    :rofl:

    I already have my donkey punch certification
     
  7. scent of a wookie

    scent of a wookie OT Supporter

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    I'm a kines major, maybe going into PT :dunno: we'll see
     
  8. Placebo

    Placebo New Member

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    dpt-doctor of physical therapy
     
  9. CPop

    CPop New Member

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    My fiance is an Occupational Therapist wo works with a lot of PT's. She's not a senior person on staff and makes close to 50k. The PT's of her seniority make about the same. The medical industry is extremely varied in it's pay, location and demand are going to sway the numbers a tremendous amount. My fiance was offered a position at 85k starting but the location wasn't something she or I wanted so she passed on it...
     
  10. Formz

    Formz Hipster Santa OT Supporter

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    Average PT here in CT is 60k a year.

    Meaning it could be 40, or it could be 80. Remember, it's an average.
     
  11. Ricey McRicerton

    Ricey McRicerton New Member

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    Don't know what the regular PTs are making at my office, but I know the head of PT is 110k a year. :dunno:
     
  12. TQ

    TQ OT Supporter

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    After actually going to therapy for my heirneated disc this seems like something I'm really interested in. It's going to add at least another semester but I think it will be worth it to do something I WANT to do ya know? :hs:

    At my school I can't actually get a degree in kinesiology but they have a Bachelor of Science in Education with a Major in Recreation w/and Emphasis on Therapy and there are several psychology and kinesiology classes that are involved.
     
  13. Psyc0

    Psyc0 TTKA

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    I'm going into sports medicine/physical therapy as well. Just changed my major to physiological science from Electrical Engineering with a biomed emphasis.
     
  14. TQ

    TQ OT Supporter

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    I'm also looking at Fitness Administration.

    Me and my brother have always joked about owning our own gym :)
     
  15. benchpressD

    benchpressD New Member

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    i just finished my first year (of three) at columbia's DPT program
     
  16. TQ

    TQ OT Supporter

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    How do you like it?

    Is this a relatively difficult degree to obtain?
     
  17. forum95

    forum95 Come see bout us OT Supporter

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    In 4 more info
     
  18. benchpressD

    benchpressD New Member

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    it's a very strenuous program but i love it. here's a quick breakdown of my first year...

    Fall Semester
    Gross Anatomy: 4 hours lecture & 6 hours cadaver lab per week. Alot of memorization and work as this is the foundation of our whole education. Every muscle, nerve, and vessel is reviewed. All origins, insertions, and actions of muscles are expected to be memorized. Dissecting a cadaver (7 lab partners per cadaver) helps tie together all the lecture material although it is very time consuming and monotonous to remove all of the unnecessary connective and adipose tissues.
    Neuroscience: 4 hours lecture per week. Reinforces gross anatomy and provides the foundation for learning all the different innervations to muscle groups. Is the introductory course to more advanced neuroscience courses and allows us to understand the effects of different neurological disorders such as Parkinsons.
    Exam & Evaluation: 2 hours lecture and 2 hours lab per week. Provides us with our first clinical skills such as manual muscle testing and measuring ROM with goniometers.
    Kinesiology & Biomechanics I: 4 hours lecture and 2 hours of lab per week. In conjunction with gross anatomy, teaches us about arthrokinematics and motions of joints in our body from head to toe. Also helped to develop clinical palpation skills.
    Professional Development I: 2 hour discussion based class per week. Introduces us to what profession is all about, stresses patient first language, introduces us to the other members of the healthcare team (OT/PTA/RN/& aides), teaches us about medicare/medicaid and other important information regarding ICD9 codes and such.

    Spring/Summer Semester:
    Modalities: 2 hours lecture & 2 hours lab per week. Educates us on the basis and how to use ultrasound, hot/cold packs, cervical/lumbar traction, TENS, e-stim, iontophoresis, etc.
    Exercise Physiology: 4 hours lecture per week. Teaches us about Vo2max and such.
    Integumentary: 2 hours of lecture and an hour of lab weekly. Prior to PT school, I didn't even know PT's were responsible for wound care. We were educated on how to debride necrotic tissue, apply dressings to wounds with tunneling and undermining, and properly wrap patients with amputated limbs.
    Histology & Pathology: 2 hours lecture per week. Discusses the different cells and tissues of the body and what happens when our these systems are afflicted by pathogens.
    CardioPulmonary I&II:About 4 hours of combined lecture and lab per week. The pulmonary component emphasized obstructive and restrictive lung diseases (emphystema, chronic bronchitis, etc) and the different ways we can treat them. The cardiac component focused on atherosclerosis, strokes, and the subsequent effects. Learned about lung sounds, auscultating heart sounds, how to play electrodes on EKGs, and taking pulse and bloodpressure.
    Pharmacology: 3 hours lecture per week. Discusses the different types of drugs for treating different afflictions. Focused heavily on the side effects and how we have to taper therapy according to patient tolerance.
    Therex: 4 hours lecture and 2 hours of lab per week. The basis for all basic therapeutic exercises and provides us with a foundation before we start our orthopedic courses.
    Kinesiology & Biomechanics I: Our introduction to gait and gait training. Also had a few weeks of doing physics problems (statics) to help understand reaction forces and the stresses it places on our joints. Most important thing to take away from the biomechanics portion was an understanding of torque.
    PT Procedures: 2 hours lecture and 2 hours of lab per week. Transfers from supine<-->sit<-->stand. Taught us how to fit crutches/canes/walkers for our patients and taught them proper ambulation with these assistive devices. Emphasized patient safety.
    Prosthetics: Very short inundation course to learn about different prosthetic limbs and how to fit them.
    Ethics: Ethics...
    Movement Science: An important but somewhat redundant course. Taught us about motor control and other stuff I can't remember off of the top of my head.


    I think this is all of the courses that I took so far... our next course are Pediatrics I, Orthopedics, and Neuro I.
    Starting my mentorship at Columbia Presbyterrean in September and then doing my first clinical affiliation at Bellevue in the rehab department.

    Hope this helps!
     
  19. TQ

    TQ OT Supporter

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    :cool:

    Good luck!
     
  20. prech

    prech New Member

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    One of my colleagues at work used to be a physical therapist, but after a few years, she just couldn't take it anymore. Sure you have the athletes with more 'interesting' ailments, but the mass majority are chronic sufferers like the elderly or some child with a spinal/bone disease. After a few years, she just couldn't take the pain and depression that she faced first hand every day. Think about how fun it would be treating some super obese person who just broke their hip with a ROM of 5 inches and who bitches 24/7 because they feel the world owes them everything
     
  21. TQ

    TQ OT Supporter

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    Yeah I know, I've been thinking about that.

    Theres pros/cons to every profession though :dunno:
     
  22. benchpressD

    benchpressD New Member

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    he's right. the majority of the individuals you will treat will not be pro athletes, bodybuilders, etc...

    the facility that you work at will broadly define the type of patients that you will see on a daily basis.

    the guide to PT practices outlines the systems reviews as follows:
    1) cardiovascular/pulmonary
    2) integumentary
    3) neuromuscular
    4) musculoskeletal

    in the cardiovascular/pulmonary departments of a hospital, you will deal with patients who have suffered strokes, deep vein thromboses, atherosclerosis, heart attacks, emphysema, chronic bronchitis, lung resections and removals.

    in the integumentary departments of a hospital, you will surprisingly remove necrotic tissue and learn how to dress and treat wounds that may have tunneling and undermining. (its disgusting)

    if you're in the pediatric dept, naturally you will treat children (usually of a neurologic disorder or some other injury)

    the typical outpatient clinic will have your mid 40-50s weekend warrior who tore their acl playing basketball or the elderly lady who has pain in her joints and significant ROM loss.

    it's all relative to where you practice...
     
  23. TQ

    TQ OT Supporter

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    Well I REALLY don't want to practice at a hospital :hsd:

    I was hoping to work at a private practice like the one I was treated at.

    They didn't deal with anything integumentary, mostly old people and athletes.

    Man I really need to think about this, my classes start tomorrow and if I'm going to change my major I need to change my classes this week :wtc: :run:
     
  24. benchpressD

    benchpressD New Member

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    i sorta went in with that mentality as well (didn't want to work in a hospital). one day i would like to have my own practice but the drawbacks of most private practices is the monotony of the treatments (knees, shoulders, ankle, lower back).

    prior to enrollment in PT school, we were required to volunteer hours at various PT clinics to get acclimated and make sure it was for us. i volunteered at 2 outpatient private practices and the treatments were typically what i just mentioned.

    now that i've seen some stuff at NYP (columbia-pres) and gotten a year under my belt, i'm starting to realize that the more interesting cases to treat do in fact occur in the hospital. i have no desire to do wound care but i'll be honest and say that i am somewhat fascinated by the pulmonary and cardiac components of PT. furthermore to treat a patient with a neurological disorder (while arguably is more depressing... arguably) just seems more challenging and possibly more rewarding. (the above mentioned occur with greater frequency in a hospital setting)

    to be in a hospital means that you are exposed to the whole array of different PT cases, not just TKRs, THRs and all the usual ailments typically found in the outpatient clinic (it might get too monotonous and boring - yet that is where you can make more money). it keeps you on your toes, up to date with the newest modalities and treatments, and the inservices should prove to be productive and invaluable. granted not all hospitals are equal, it really depends where you are. however i'd like to note that our program and the majority of graduates as well prefer to at least start in a hospital so we can become well rounded and prepared to handle any bizarre case we may encounter.

    with that said, my ideal would be to graduate and then work at a place like Hospital for Special Surgery, Hospital for Joint Diseases, or the Kessler Institute which are all reknown facilities for PT.
     
  25. benchpressD

    benchpressD New Member

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    another point i would like to make...

    i was an economics major but still graduated in time fulfilling my pre-reqs for all of the DPT programs i applied to and was accepted (WashU in St. Louis, Duke, Columbia, NYU)

    YOU DO NOT NEED TO MAJOR IN KINES OR BIO OR EXERCISE PHYS to prepare for PT SCHOOL!!!

    you just need to get all the core requirements done (which vary depending upon the program you are applying to)
     
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