Do Laptops have the same ability to do work as desktops?

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by nmt6789, Jul 21, 2006.

  1. nmt6789

    nmt6789 Guest

    I am looking into getting a laptop and I was just wondering?
     
  2. Maliboost

    Maliboost New Member

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    yes and no, if you want to play the best games i'd say no
     
  3. Nefarious77

    Nefarious77 Guest

    For productivity - yes
    For intensive gaming - no
     
  4. mdaniel

    mdaniel S is for Shiksa

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    Unless you get one with a 7200 rpm hard drive, disk access will be a lot slower than a typical desktop and that has a big impact on overall system performance.
     
  5. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Laptops usually lag about a year behind desktops in terms of performance; in the realm of 3D rendering, they've lagged more like three or four years behind, because of the power requirements and heat generation that 3D cards have. That's also been true for laptop CPUs recently, but since Intel's Conroe is supposed to be blazing fast AND low-power, laptop CPUs should go back to being comparable to desktops again in the near future.

    If you want to run a bunch of apps at once, a nice Core Duo system will be pleasantly fast. If you want to render 3D graphics, you'll probably hang yourself after the first couple of sessions.

    Get a system with an SATA hard drive; they're a little faster, and it's a forward-looking upgrade path. IDE is dead, except for cheap, long-term storage.

    You can compensate for the slower hard drives that laptops usually have by maxing out the RAM and turning off the hard drive swapfile -- but don't buy the RAM from the laptop vendor, because they love to charge a premium for the one upgrade part that everybody knows how to install. Find out what the RAM specs are for the laptop you're getting, buy the smallest amount of RAM possible when you order the laptop, and buy more RAM with the same specs on NewEgg. You'll save a nice piece of change.

    I buy all the laptop RAM I need from www.oempcworld.com. They do a great job of keeping track of the kind of RAM that every laptop ever made uses, and their prices are comparable to NewEgg's.

    Buying a system with well-balanced performance is good overall, but it's crucial if you're buying a laptop. A laptop that has one or two screaming-fast components and crappy parts everywhere else is going to be about as useful as if it were made entirely with crappy components, and it's impossible to upgrade most of the components later on. With a desktop, you can buy a cheap Dell with a badass video card and then you can put a faster CPU and hard drive in later, but you can't do that with a laptop. It's better to have a system that distributes its total cost more evenly across its entire component spec, so that it will still be relatively-comfortable to use in a few years when it's hopelessly outdated. I like Fujitsu laptops for this reason; though some people think IBM/Lenovo is the only brand worth buying, you can at least use Fujitsu's system specs as a guide regardless of which brand you end up buying.
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2006
  6. CastorTroy

    CastorTroy New Member

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    Same ability, some ways yes, some no. But really it depends on what you want to do.
     
  7. Schproda

    Schproda New Member

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    Yeah it depends on what you're wanting to do with it. For power saving and powering down the HDD and screen, there's a reason they power down. The HDDs just don't have the same lifespan as those for a PC. I work on laptops almost daily.

    As for processor speed they're beginning to use a 8MB cache for them now instead of bumping them up to a 3.2 with 1MB. They're definitely not for gaming that's for sure.
     

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