do I need an hd reciever?

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by size18boarder, Dec 5, 2005.

  1. size18boarder

    size18boarder rhetorical OT Supporter

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    I just bought my hd ready lcd tv, and tv looks ok on it. will buying an hd reciever help picture of normal cable? or at least channels that broadcast in HD? I just have a cable running to my tv, no box or anything.
     
  2. size18boarder

    size18boarder rhetorical OT Supporter

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  3. SilverJettaGLX

    SilverJettaGLX OT Supporter

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    The only way you are going to get an HD picture on a HD-ready set only is with an external tuner/source. That being said, regardless of what you get standard defenition will look OK at best on pretty much any new HD set. What model TV did you get?
     
  4. Asses Maximus

    Asses Maximus Guns don't kill people. People kill people. Guns d

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    need-no
    but you should want one

    You may need to get digital cable in order to receive HD channels. You can still pick up broadcast HD. I dont think regular cable carries HD channels, but I could be wrong.
     
  5. johnson

    johnson New Member

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    To get a high def picture, yes. Satellite companies charge an extra $10 for HD service (dish and direct iirc) and you can get an indoor antenna that can catch OTA (over the air) hd signals like your local channels. Call your cable company to see what they have.
     
  6. size18boarder

    size18boarder rhetorical OT Supporter

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    haha basically im not paying for cable, it was just never disconnected, but obviously the box is gone. so im just running coax antenna from the wall into my tv (dvd player actually cuz im using it as a revciever right now). so calling the cable company really isnt an option, if i just have the cable running into the HD box, will i get any improvements on any channels?
     
  7. Asses Maximus

    Asses Maximus Guns don't kill people. People kill people. Guns d

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  8. Harry V. Gina

    Harry V. Gina How did your family do in Katrina?

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    This is an e-mail I wrote to a friend a while back:

    First off, it's imortant to know that only a fraction of TV programming is offered in HD. The good news is that most of the good stuff like prime-time network shows and sports are usually available in HD. Cable and satellite offer HBO and Showtime in HD, as well as dedicated HD channels like DiscoveryHD and INHD which show things like documentaries and IMAX movies (awesome in HD).

    If you're primarily interested in watching sports and network shows in HD, then the cheapest way to go is to get an HDTV receiver box and an antenna. Since your TV is a "HDTV monitor" then you have to get an external box. Many HDTV's sold today have an HDTV tuner built-in, in which case you only need to buy the antenna.

    The HDTV receiver and antenna will allow you to watch the networks (ABC, CBS, NBC, FOX) in HD. The boxes usually go for around $200 and an antenna is between $30-$150 depending on what your mounting options are and how big an antenna you are willing to put up. The antenna usually has to be outdoors to pull in all the channels, and in rural areas, a large antenna is somtimes needed to pull in any stations. Since you are receiving broadast signals there is no monthly subscription fee, you only pay for the eqiupment.

    If you want to go the cable route, then you call the cable company and tell them that you want to upgrade to digital cable and HDTV service. Assuming you have Comcast, the Comcast guy will come in, install the HD cable box, hook it up to your HDTV, and give you a remote that can be easily programmed to control not only the cable box, but your tv volume, DVD player, and VCR. Now you will pay a lot more every month for your cable, but you should be able to watch all the networks in HD, and also things like ESPN HD, Discovery HD, INHD 1+2 (really cool), and HBO and Showtime in HD (for an extra fee, of course). Also, when the Sox start up again, you can only watch them in HD on cable.

    Are you familiar with tivo? Cable boxes these days can have a tivo-like device built-in so that you can record and playback shows without using a vcr or dvd recorder. It's kind of like a cell phone in that once you have one, you will never understand how you were able to live without it. Most cable providers are also offering on-demand service which allows you to watch shows whenever you want without having to record them. The cable company simply keeps them stored on hard drives at their facility, and sends them to your cabe box at your request. Missed the first 4 episodes of Rome this season? No problem, just go to the on demand menu and watch them at your lesiure. I don't think that on demand is available in HD, though, and it does cost extra.

    In case you are wondering, I actually use both cable and a HDTV receiver and antenna so that I can get everything. My lousy cable provider (Cox) does not carry FOX or CBS in HD. (I must be able to watch 24 in HD, Jack Bauer would not approve otherwise.)

    You also might want to look into satellite (DirecTV). It can be a pain to get installed, but usually the monthly costs are lower than cable, and the picture quality can be a little better than cable. The number of HDTV channels they are offering right now is roughly equivalent to cable (10-15?), but I believe they are planning on sending up another satellite so that they can offer more HD channels. You can get every channel under the sun incuding local stations and NESN, but at this point I don't think that they are offering NESN in HD, so that means no Sox in HD. That is often a deal-breaker for anyone in and around Boston.

    Having said all that, I'd say the best overall way to go is to just get HD cable. The monthly fees can be high, but installation is easy, and you will get all the HD sports programming.
     
  9. size18boarder

    size18boarder rhetorical OT Supporter

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    u sure?
     
  10. Asses Maximus

    Asses Maximus Guns don't kill people. People kill people. Guns d

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    yes, your hd reciever is not going to upscale or clarify your cable signal. If that were the case I would have bought one for my tv becasue the cable at our college has terrible quality and I cant do a damn thing about it.
     

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