Difference between PentiumD and P4...

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by GunboatDiplomat, Jul 24, 2006.

  1. GunboatDiplomat

    GunboatDiplomat New Member

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    I'm about to do some video editing in Premiere Pro and I'm wondering if it's worth upgrading my P4 3.0 GHz HT processor to a Pentium D 3.0GHz dual core processor.
    What do you think? For processor bound processes, is it worth it? Does anyone think the Pentium D will drop in price in the near future?
    Thank you...
     
  2. Tvan

    Tvan New Member

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    The Pentium D should drop soon now that the Core 2 Duos are being released. You would also highly benefit from such an upgrade because dual core processors are much better for multitasking, like you are probably doing a lot of while running Premier.
     
  3. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    You can't just upgrade a Pentium 4 to a Pentium 4D, as I understand it. The pins on the underside are different, and even if they were the same, the motherboard still has to be capable of detecting both CPU cores. You'd have to get a new motherboard, and as long as you're doing that you might as well upgrade straight to Conroe.
     
  4. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    the Pentium D uses the LGA-775 package, and works with 945 chipsets and onward. The Pentium 4 works with 945 chipets onward, as well, and is available in the LGA-775 package (I'm posting this on an LGA-775 P4 machine, in fact).

    So in certain cases, you CAN simply swap the CPU.

    However, I recommend a format/re-install of windows if you do so.
     
  5. GunboatDiplomat

    GunboatDiplomat New Member

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    I, too, am posting this on an LGA-775 P4 machine, hence my question to upgrade. However, do you think I really need to re-install the OS? I was hoping the change would be transparent to Windows. I mean, really, what does the OS know or care about the processor(s)? It already thinks it's on a multi-processor system...
     
  6. Tvan

    Tvan New Member

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    There are no pins on an LGA775 compatible chip...
    http://www.benchmark.co.yu/tests/mainboards/gigabyte/GA-8GPNXP_Duo/lga775_02.jpg

    And yes, your motherboard most likely could work with a dual core processor with the latest bios revision.

    I did this recently upgrading from my AMD 3500+ San Diego to an FX-60. Upon my first bootup, Windows ran fine, but only recognized one core. So, I busted out my motherboard CD and used the auto-updater to download an flash the bios.

    There will most likely be a similar process for your computer even though it's not AMD based. At the very most, all you would have to do is create a bootable floppy.
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2006
  7. DAN513

    DAN513 OT Supporter

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    I think in the worst case, you may have to re activate windows, changing the cpu shouldn't warrant a reinstall.
     
  8. GunboatDiplomat

    GunboatDiplomat New Member

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    My current computer is an hyperthreaded system, so I'm hoping I won't even have to do that!

    So, what's the performance like? A good comparison would be a Pentium D with one core disabled vs my P4 with hyperthreading disabled. How do the two processors compare in this situation?
     
  9. threeclaws

    threeclaws R.I.P.

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    They would perform identical, assuming identical clock/bus rates.

    However HT while effective is not anywhere near the performance of a dual core proc. when it comes to multithreaded apps (of which video programs usually are.)
     
  10. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    I know the LGA775 doesn't have pins; whether or not the "pins" as I called them are really pins is beside the point. "The pattern of electrical contacts, whatever sort they may be...", if you prefer a different wording.

    I had an old 286 that used a PLCC64 socket, I believe. It just had little gold contact stripes on the underside of the chip. Nifty little thing; I wish I still had it.
     
  11. Maffy29

    Maffy29 Active Member

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    I have a Pentium D

    To give you a rough idea, I've had my computer go into my weekly virus scan while I was editing some photos and I never even noticed. Same goes for burning a CD. I can continue what I was doing and hardly notice any performance difference.
     
  12. et3rnul

    et3rnul OT Supporter

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    If you're considering an upgrade to a Pentium D and want to keep costs down, i'd suggest getting the Pentium D 805. It runs stock at 2.66 GHz, but alot of people overclock it to 3.2GHz (stock heatsink/fan) all the way to 4.1 (with very good water cooling).

    Newegg currently has it for $104.

    Make sure to check if your motherboard supports the D series, just to be safe.

    http://www.tomshardware.com/2006/05/10/dual_41_ghz_cores/
     
  13. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    It works even better if you limit the virus scan to a single core, so it doesn't keep jumping back and forth between cores. Getting the part of the scanner that runs in SYSTEM mode to stay in a single core is tricky, but I wrote a program that can do it. I love being able to make my own tools.
     
  14. Maffy29

    Maffy29 Active Member

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    Can I get that??
     
  15. sowapowa

    sowapowa New Member

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    If you are thinking of upgrading, you should also consider your motherboard. I believe most of the current LGA 775 mobos do not support conroe and there will not be bios updates to move to conroe.

    The best oc'ing mobo is the asus p5w dh deluxe which runs $250. There is also an Intel mobo that is recieving a lot of attention - its named "bad axe". Not sure how much that one costs.

    The new core 2 duo line is really a giant compared to pent D though. You should really examine how long you want to have your current setup. If you are going to upgrade again in the near future, go ahead and get the pent D.

    You really cant go wrong when buying any dual core processor right now. All the prices are really nice and if you choose to spend you get a really high quality item.
     
  16. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    buying an asus mobo for an intel chip? no!
     
  17. GunboatDiplomat

    GunboatDiplomat New Member

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    Why do you say that? I'm running a P4 on an Asus P5AD2 without any issues. What problems do you anticipate with Intel chips on Asus motherboards?
     
  18. sowapowa

    sowapowa New Member

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    There are very few motherboards that support the conroe. As of now, the asus overclocks the best. I believe the intel "bad axe" motherboard also clocks well but its hard to find a retailer that sells that board.

    I suppose if you dont overclock any board would do fine.
     
  19. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    why buy the 2nd best when you can get the best for the same price?
     
  20. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Yeah, I can hook you up. Is there a place I can send a self-extracting ZIP file to you? I still haven't found a stable webhost.
     
  21. threeclaws

    threeclaws R.I.P.

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    Because the "best" will only give you limited overclocking options.
     
  22. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    I never understood that. You bought a highly-reliable solution (intel) but then immidiately attack it's ability to be reliable by overclocking. Run a mild OC (just a few % on the FSB) and then call it a day.

    I'd take a mild OC Intel mobo over an extreme-OC Asus mobo, any day.
     
  23. threeclaws

    threeclaws R.I.P.

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    I never understood why ignorant people think that a properly overclocked system is unreliable.
     
  24. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    The problem is not in the overclock, but that is is a well-documented FACT that genuine-intel motherboards are THE MOST RELIABLE option for the Intel platform.

    You then stated that the Intel, although it is the best, doesn't oc as much. Therefore I point out that you are foolish for trading reliability for a few more MHz.

    My argument is not saying that Asus is less reliable because of the overclock. My argument is that the Intel is MORE reliable because of the design, testing, and component selection.
     
  25. threeclaws

    threeclaws R.I.P.

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    Most of the top tier boardmakers use Intel reference designs (when using intel chipsets) so...

    If the system runs 24/7 without issue the Intel board may be MORE reliable but in the end they are both reliable, period.

    So after reliability comes features of which the Asus is superior.
     

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