declan wants to be a software engineer

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by piratepenguin, Jan 22, 2008.

  1. piratepenguin

    piratepenguin New Member

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    I have a few questions:

    1. is there a lot of money in it?
    2. does it generally take long to end up an actual software engineer, rather than a crappy programmer? I intend to probably go to uni for an extra year to come out with a masters in software engineering, since that should help me.
    3. if anyone works in this field, what is it like?

    The degree I intend to do begins doing software engineering and "information systems" for a first year, and then specializes for year 2 and onwards. What kindof jobs would information systems lead to? Managing enterprise computers and such? I can't imagine enjoying that particular aspect of it anyhow, our dude in school does fuck all until people can't get things to work. Nothing exciting, but that's just a school. Maybe in banks or different environments it'd be more interesting.

    But really I think software engineering is for me. Actually don't dream of searching for a job as one, but starting my own business with a software project I'm going to work on for my (4/5) years in uni. But I can't put all my hopes into this right now without knowing that I'll have a good living to fall back on. (obviously if I have to work for 2 years fixing bugs on a not-so-great salary after 4 or 5 years in uni I wouldn't call that "good" in itself but to know that there's life at the end of the tunnel..)

    What is the pay like for a usual crap-job programmer like, anyhow? (pay is a big issue for me - don't mind to work like a horse if I'm getting well paid, though questionable is how long I could put up with a crap job..)
     
  2. mrj

    mrj New Member

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    1. Of course, dependant upon what industry you work in and what skills you obtain. The great thing about programming as opposed to more specified IT work (Engineering, etc) is that you can work in many industries that have nothing to do with one another. I work in web-hosting, and that's pretty much it.

    2; A software engineer is a fluffer title that large companies call their programmers. That, or Analysts, although Analysts are more of the DBA types.

    3; I don't work in the field, I'm a Sys Admin, but I'd highly recommend not waiting until you're in school to begin learning the languages. I started with Python, which several Universities nowadays are throwing their newbie programmers at, but other people recommend C. I'll head to C once I get a good grasp of Python.

    I don't find anything interesting in programming at this point, though. But I really would like to work in a position that was less break-fix and more debug.
     
  3. GOGZILLA

    GOGZILLA Double-Uranium Member

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    i dont know of any "software engineers" that haven't done an extensive amount of programming. you cant engineer stuff that you don't understand
     
  4. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    I've been programming since I was 13 -- not professional-level, obviously, but I have been programming in some capacity for 12 years. That's a good start for conditioning the brain to think about problems systematically.

    I took 24 credits of programming and approximately 36 credits of software engineering and program management classes. The computer science majors at my school took 48 credits of programming and picked up whatever engineering/management knowledge they could along the way. So, if my coursework is at all typical, I have half the formal education in programming -- and far more education in engineering and management -- compared to a CS major.

    My total credits were 134, compared to the CS major's 120. Four of my nine semesters were full loads, or 18 credits. 2/3 of my starting class dropped out, on-par with other engineering courses.

    So it's no small task, but it is doable. My work ethic sucked (relative to super-type-A personalities) and I escaped with a BSSE and a 3.0 GPA -- no small miracle considering I had to take a year of calculus and a year of differential equations and a semester of statistics.
     
  5. FusionZ06

    FusionZ06 /\__/\__/\__0>

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    Is that you in your av :mamoru:
     
  6. trano

    trano Guest

    its boring and frustrating. u ahve to do everything PERFECT
     
  7. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    You have to do that at any job, sparky. Do you think you could slack off if you were a programmer or a DB admin instead?
     
  8. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Yes.
     

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