Decent way to clean out dust?

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by Imtoodumbtothinkofone, Jan 20, 2006.

  1. Imtoodumbtothinkofone

    Imtoodumbtothinkofone New Member

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    Well the computer is full of dust and probably the reason why its running a bit hotter.

    Is there any non-dodgy way of getting rid of it? There's a shite load of dust in the heatsink it looks like
     
  2. CyberBullets

    CyberBullets I reach to the sky, and call out your name. If I c

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    can of compressed air
     
  3. skelm

    skelm New Member

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    :werd:

    Used to that when working in a hardware shop. Works very well, and it's cheap :)
     
  4. Raindrop

    Raindrop New Member

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    Yup...canned air. I'd advise to remember to turn the power off, and if possible, do it outside. :big grin:
     
  5. carlheinz

    carlheinz New Member

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    I always use a hoover and a small paint brush. Works a treat.
    BTW cans of compressed air are great for removing stuck on chewing gum...
     
  6. rsxm5

    rsxm5 OT Supporter

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    I would not use a vacuum. Most vacuums carry a decent amount of static electricity, and can kill computer components. Stick with compressed air.
     
  7. ZeusH8sU

    ZeusH8sU New Member

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    I believe thats why vacumm cleaners and pc's have grounds in the plug it would be ok if everything is grounded correctly I've done it for years,but anyway if you hold a vacumm hose near the pc u can brush some of the dust off or u can also use the compressed air to blow it off the pc and have the vacumm to suck it up.
     
  8. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    NO! Do NOT use canned air! As I said in another post, you have no idea what the dust is made of, and you have no idea where that can of air is going to blow the dust into. I killed a motherboard when I used a can of air to clean it, only to discover later that a shard of metal (probably scraped out of a screw hole on the case) had gotten lodged between two of the wires coming out of the BIOS and shorted it out. It never worked again.

    Use an artist's paintbrush to dust the parts off, and use a vacuum cleaner hose to suck the dusty air out of the case. Don't use the brush on the vacuum cleaner, because the air getting sucked through the plastic bristles generates a lot of static which will also kill your computer.

    EDIT: In addition to the compressed air blowing the dust into places you may regret later, the compressed air also gets very cold when it comes out of the can and expands. Cold = condensation. Do you really want to be blowing tiny drops of water onto your sensitive electronic parts? I didn't think so.
     
  9. ZeusH8sU

    ZeusH8sU New Member

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    As long as you clean out the case before you put it together and make your splices and connection mods outside the case like on a work table you should'nt have a problem.When I put systems together I mount the drives in first and then blow out the case before installing the motherboard which then sits on plastics tabs/feet to prvent any shorts.And if you use the can of air in short burst you should not have any problems with moisture.
     
  10. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    And what happens when you take the case screws out to open the thing up, and slide the door along the frame, or replace a disk drive? Hm? More metal shavings. Unless you pull out the motherboard every time you do a minor upgrade, that is. And that has its own major risks; putting a screwdriver through the motherboard, for instance. The metal shavings may be microscopic, but they still conduct electricity. And furthermore, you have ball bearing fans (or worse, bronze bushing fans that grind themselves apart) and DVD motors spinning away inside the case day after day, and the case is pulling in outside air and god knows what-all is floating in it...

    In fact, most dust is dead skin cells, and dead skin cells soak up water very nicely. Combine a coating of dead skin with a little condensation from the cold can of air, and you've got yourself a nice conductor to kill your machine with.

    There is simply no excuse for using compressed air if you don't absolutely have to. Except being lazy or otherwise not caring, and one fried board will cure you of that.
     
  11. dorkultra

    dorkultra OT's resident crohns dude OT Supporter

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    did you know that you can take a circuit board and completely remove it from the case, then wash it in mild soapy water.
    the trick is to let it properly dry before you hook it back up.
    sounds crazy, but true
     
  12. Seiz

    Seiz ヽ(´ー`)┌

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    mini dust vac
     
  13. ZeusH8sU

    ZeusH8sU New Member

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    deusexaethera if your threading you case screw and sliding your panel hard enough to create metal shavings you must have some anger issues and should'nt be working in or around a pc.

    My previous post applied to the initial build,cause once you have everything mounted every should be dis-aasembled and re-assembled with no problems unless you strip a thred which would create shavings which then you have to clean out,the other option is to use the plastic locking sliders for the drives.

    I've used canned air for many,many years and never had a problem because I use it in quick burst,the way your supposed to in areas where a brush cannot reach,I do agree with what you said,If you use to much air from the can you can put moisture on the board but if most people just glance at the label they would see that it says to *Use in small burst*.In the off chance that you do get some moisture on the board if you let it air dry for a good while it will be okay.

    And as far as the motors are concerned they are inside sealed lubricated enclosures that contain all the *microscopic particles* the only way they would be exposed is if the exploded inside the case,which I've never seen but if they ever fail they either stop working or just seize up.
     
  14. Boogieman117

    Boogieman117 PSN: Boogieman117

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    Yup, Air Can } Outside = nice n' clean puter.
     
  15. crontab

    crontab (uid = 0)

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    There are risks to doing anything. Does everyone here ground themselves with a wrist strap when they mess with the inards of their pc? Probably not.

    Best tools:

    Vacuum with hose for the big chunks
    Paint brush to loosen up the tight spots, fans, ps, etc..
    Compressed air to blow all the loose stuff out.

    To proactively decrease the amount of dust within the pc, tape on ac vent filters on the intake end of the pc. I do this to all of my pc's and there minimal dust within my pc after a year. The filter is filthy, but the inside is nice and clean. Temps don't seem to be affected with the filter in place according to mbm.
     
  16. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Go take a materials engineering class, like I had to before I could get my engineering degree. Friction always causes damage to the materials rubbing against each other. The shavings are microscopic, but so are the spaces they can jam themselves into.

    As for the condensation, yeah, people who are careful won't have any problems. It's the ones who aren't careful that I'm warning.
     
  17. CyberBullets

    CyberBullets I reach to the sky, and call out your name. If I c

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    no av, no care :mamoru: :noes: :greddy:
     

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