Deadlifts

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by spoofy, Oct 14, 2003.

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  1. spoofy

    spoofy Chemically Enhanced

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    This should be a part of everyones routine and I have yet to see any threads here explain deads ... so here is something. Most of this is taken from animalpak.com

    Partial Deadlifts
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    If you've never deadlifted before, I'd recommend starting with partial deadlifts from a power rack or a squat rack. The starting bar placement should be just above the knee and with a conventional or close-foot stance. Hand placement, or grip, should be either a reverse grip (hands opposite each other) or forward grip using hand straps. I would not recommend using gloves during any type of pulling exercise because they cause you to lose your sense of touch.

    This is what actually causes you to lose your grip. Always start by using a lighter weight than what you would use for your working set. As you start your pull, keep your knees bent and back flat. Push with your legs and throw your hips into it, locking the bar at arm's length with your shoulders back. Each rep thereafter should be "touch and go" style. By this I mean instead of stopping at the bottom and re-setting to pull again for each rep, you just go down, touch, and repeat rep after rep without stopping the set until you're done. These deads are very good at getting the feel of the weight in your hands and developing thickness.

    Typical Routine:


    1 x 10 @ 135lb.
    1 x 5 @ 225lb.
    1 x 5 @ 315lb.
    3 x 5 @ 405lb. (working set)
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2003
  2. spoofy

    spoofy Chemically Enhanced

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    Stiff-Legged Deadlifts
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    Heavy weights should only be attempted by the advanced lifter. This style will work your hamstrings and lower back. Stand on a block, box or platform in order to get a complete stretch. Start the pull in a regular conventional (close stance) position. As you descend on the second rep, keep your knees almost completely straight and reach down as far as you can go, keeping the bar in close to your legs. Make sure you keep your back flat.

    Typical Routine:


    1 x 10 @ 135lb.
    1 x 10 @ 205lb.
    3 x 10 @ 225lb.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2003
  3. spoofy

    spoofy Chemically Enhanced

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    Tips: Bend at your waist with your head up, back straight and knees nearly locked. Hold bar with hands about 16 inches apart. Straighten up while holding the bar at arm's length. Lower back down to the floor but do not let plates touch. This can be a dangerous exercise if not done correctly or done with weights that are too heavy. Can also be done standing on a bench or box (so that plates don't touch the floor) or with dumbbells.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2003
  4. spoofy

    spoofy Chemically Enhanced

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    Conventional (close stance) Deadlifts
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    The reason for using a flat-soled shoe is to be as close to the ground as possible. Believe me, when you wear a regular tennis shoe, that 1" sole will affect the maximum weight, regardless of your stance. Stand with your feet about shoulder-width apart and your shins touching the bar. Your hand placement (grip) should be on the outside of your legs, so that as you pull, your hands are on the outside of your legs, instead of dragging up your thighs.

    With your knees bent and your back flat, begin your pull by pushing off the heels of your feet, dragging the bar up your legs, and keeping it in as close as possible. As the bar comes over the top of your knees, throw your hips into it, locking out at arm's length with your shoulders back.

    Never pull any style of deadlift with a rounded back. Touch and go style reps work similar to stiff legs. Reps done by stopping and resetting each time work the hip flexors, quads, glutes and hamstrings. This is an explosive movement: snap the bar off the floor each time with a smooth transition. Be sure to keep your arms straight at all times. Conditioning for this style would be to touch and go all of your reps, including your top set. To work strength and explosion, you would re-set after each rep.

    Typical Routine:


    1 x 10 @ 135
    1 x 8 @ 225
    1 x 6 @ 315
    3 x 5 @ 405

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2003
  5. spoofy

    spoofy Chemically Enhanced

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    Tips: Think of a deadlift as a squat, only the bar is in your hands rather than on your back.

    The Stance: Approach the loaded barbell and assume a stance about as wide as your own shoulders while gripping the bar such that the inner aspects of your arms are slightly outside of your thighs. Another way to determine your optimal deadlift foot placement is to jump down from a box which is half your own height and "stick" the landing. Now look at your feet...this will approximate your ideal stance width and degree of foot turn-out.

    Feet and Shin Position: Feet should point straight forward or turned out to a 25 degree angle at most. The best foot angle is one which provides the least amount of hip and knee restriction when you lower the hips in preparation to lift, so don't be afraid to experiment a bit. The shins should be two to three inches from the bar and then when you actually bend down and lower your hips in preparation to lift, the shins will touch the bar. Most of the weight will be on the heels of the feet. This facilitates maximal contribution of the glutes and hamstrings. During the ascent, the bar will travel as close to the leg and shins as possible. Ideally, wear cotton sweat pants or track pants with long socks to protect your shins.

    Hand Position: A "reverse grip" should be used when deadlifting. This means that one hand will be supinated (palm faces you) and the other pronated (palm facing away). This will help keep the bar in your hand. If grip strength is not one of your training targets, feel free to use wrist straps with a conventional grip. Hold the bar high up on the palm to compensate for any roll of the bar when pulling the weight up. Generally, the grip should start with the index finger and the little finger bordering the knurling in the middle of the bar.

    Head Placement and Eye Contact: The entire spine should remain neutral, which means you look neither up nor down, but instead, the head follows the body, almost like you're wearing a cervical cast on your neck. It's OK for the head to be SLIGHTLY up (this tends to improve muscular contraction of the low back muscles) but in all cases, the lift must start with the hips down, the entire spine neutral, and the feet flat on the floor.

    The Ascent: As you stand up with the weight, imagine pushing the earth away from you with your feet. When viewed from the side, your hips and shoulders should ascend together; if the hips rise before the shoulders, it means you're using your back rather than your legs. If this happens, reduce the weight until you can perform the lift correctly and add more specific quad-strengthening exercises to your program.

    The Lockout: Competitive powerlifters are required to demonstrate control over the weight by standing up and then extending the hips forward in an exaggerated manner. If you're NOT a competitive lifter, simply stand up with the weight without this exaggerated maneuver.

    The Descent: Simply return the bar to the floor, under control, by reversing the technique you used to lift the weight.


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2003
  6. spoofy

    spoofy Chemically Enhanced

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    DONT DO THIS!

    [​IMG]

    OR THIS

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2003
  7. spoofy

    spoofy Chemically Enhanced

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    Sumo-Style (wide stance) Deadlifts
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    With this stance, your grip is inside your legs as you pull the weight up and your leverage is almost the same as a wide stance squat. The width of your foot placement varies depending on comfort. Balance and technique are the key elements involved in the sumo stance. A majority of the shorter lifters like the sumo stance, due to the shorter travel distance. The idea behind the sumo-style deadlift is basically the same as the conventional deadlift. However, the key element in the sumo-style is if you can break the weight off the floor, most of the time, you can complete the lift.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2003
  8. spoofy

    spoofy Chemically Enhanced

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    Box Deadlifts
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    These are regular, conventional style deadlifts performed while standing on a box. You cannot handle near the amount of weight as you can from the floor, so these are to be done after your heavy sets. Your legs come into play much more than your back while doing this movement. Some lifters prefer to do this movement on their leg day for assistance work. Work schedule would be the same as the stiff-legged deadlift.
     
  9. spoofy

    spoofy Chemically Enhanced

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    Heavy Lockouts
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    These are very similar to partial deadlifts except that the weight is on the boxes and the bar position is at the top of your knee when you begin the lift. The reason for this movement is to get the same harmonics out of the bar just as if you were pulling from the ground. 3 x 3 with a heavy weight, usually 100lb. more than you pulled from the floor.
     
  10. spoofy

    spoofy Chemically Enhanced

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    bump for the newbs
     
  11. trancezj

    trancezj New Member

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    Awwww, I like to see newbs fucking up their backs. :wtc:
     
  12. TheProwler

    TheProwler Active Member

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    Lightweights. :rolleyes:



    :big grin:
     
  13. KingGargantuan

    KingGargantuan ♖♘♗♕♔♗♘♖

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    interesting those sets are only x5 reps.
     
  14. Enigma

    Enigma Guest

    good thread
     
  15. Ceaze

    Ceaze https://hearthis.at/DoYouEvenUplift Moderator

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    yeah, that's way too many
     
  16. MiseryIndex

    MiseryIndex i never know why. i only know who. Moderator

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    i do a warmup set of 135 for 8 reps
    then 225 for 5
    then all my other sets are 3 or less.
     
  17. flubber

    flubber Guest

    I must be doing something wrong. I was fine at 135lb., but when I tried to pull 405 my spine shot out of my back! Some big guy walking by picked it up and ate it, saying "mmmmm....protein".

    good thread, I haven't done DL in a while, this will get me motivated to do them again!
     
  18. bfvrock

    bfvrock Active Member

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    :rofl: :rofl:

    is it bad that id rather do deadlifts from just a regular floor rather then the squat rack?
     
  19. Werdna

    Werdna Livin' the SLO Life...

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    I do 6x3 on deadlifts.
     
  20. Simple

    Simple Sexy Beatch

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    wtf? rephrase
     
  21. PreemO

    PreemO OT Supporter

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    lol lots of post spoofy. btw, is the guy in the first pic locking out or just flexing for fun ?:)
     
  22. Ceaze

    Ceaze https://hearthis.at/DoYouEvenUplift Moderator

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    that's Ron Harris
     
  23. PreemO

    PreemO OT Supporter

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    [​IMG]
    "...i just farted" hehehhehee
     
  24. KingGargantuan

    KingGargantuan ♖♘♗♕♔♗♘♖

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    :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:
     
  25. PreemO

    PreemO OT Supporter

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    another thing i like about that pic is that there's a fractal effect going on with the mirrors. :cool:
     
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