Cyptopgraphy and Computers

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by drgh0st, Dec 6, 2004.

  1. drgh0st

    drgh0st New Member

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    Where would one start as a hobby?
     
  2. CyberBullets

    CyberBullets I reach to the sky, and call out your name. If I c

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    start with simple crypto algorithms and start playing with prime numbers. lots of information on google groups. mostly high end calc.


    (quantum computing destroys all or crytography :hs:)
     
  3. Balzz

    Balzz N54 Elitist OT Supporter

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    Interestingly enough, I was recently working with someone who was developing quantum cryptography. Not only was it strong encryption, but you would be able to tell if someone had decrypted the message in transit. :eek3:
     
  4. Scoob_13

    Scoob_13 Anything is possible, but the odds are astronomica

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    That's cool - when it was decrypted, was a series of bits changed to reflect the numbers of times that it was put through a decryption sequence?
     
  5. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

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    Depends, how mathematically inclined are you?
     
  6. Balzz

    Balzz N54 Elitist OT Supporter

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    Fuck if I know...the dude is a theoritical physicist. :noes:
     
  7. kingtoad

    kingtoad OT Supporter

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    :noes:
     
  8. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

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    It uses the fact that in quantum machanics, you cannot observe a particle (in this case a photon) without changing it. Most quantum cryptography devices use polarization to encode the data, and there are three different polarization states for each photon. If you read one, the others change.
     

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