A&P CS3 causing color shifts when converting to JPG

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by ///Mik3, Mar 6, 2008.

  1. ///Mik3

    ///Mik3 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2008
    Messages:
    911
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    All Over California
    I recently upgraded from Photoshop CS2 to CS3, and w/ CS2 whenever i would save my images as a jpg for web use, it would turn out looking pretty close to my original image.

    After having upgraded to CS3, whenever i save something as a jpg, there's a pretty drastic red shift.

    When saving a file for webuse in CS2, i would size it, convert it to 8bit (i do all editing in 16bit), convert to sRGB (my working space is adobeRGB) and the do a "save for web."

    Now, w/ CS2, i've tried several different combinations of things, and everytime the image looks a whole lot warmer in the end. I've tried converting to sRGB before going to save for web, and turning off the "convert to sRGB option in the saving menu." I've left it as adobeRGB and went to save for web and checked the "convert to sRGB" option. Everytime it ends up drastically red. Some combinations have yielded different levels of color shift, but it seems to happen no matter what.

    Any ideas?
     
  2. jaydub

    jaydub Every calling is great when greatly pursued.

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2000
    Messages:
    88,366
    Likes Received:
    0
    I remember I used to have to select "proof colors" under the view menu. It's a pain in the ass, and it only happened on one machine. I never found out what caused it, but this seemed to alleviate the problem.
     
  3. jared_IRL

    jared_IRL OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2006
    Messages:
    17,737
    Likes Received:
    55
    No, it's easy!

    File>converto to profile

    Then choose sRGB.

    Then save normally, NOT through save for web.
     
  4. ///Mik3

    ///Mik3 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2008
    Messages:
    911
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    All Over California
    actually, i've tried that also (saving normally) and it still ends up w/ a red shift.
     
  5. jared_IRL

    jared_IRL OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2006
    Messages:
    17,737
    Likes Received:
    55
    Not if you convert the profile. You don't want to 'assign' the profile, you want to convert it.

    Where are you viewing it that is causing the shift?

    When do you see the shift? Immedietly after converting? after saving? When opening in different program?

    What profile are you set to when you open the images? Are they Raw images? Do you always use sRGB?
     
  6. ///Mik3

    ///Mik3 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2008
    Messages:
    911
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    All Over California
    ok, well i found one solution, but i dunno if this is the only real way to get the colors to actually look correct.

    What i did was i had the image open, and i duplicated it. W/ the duplicate, i set it to view as proof colors which was set to monitor RGB. This simulated the red shift that i was seeing. So i made color balance adjustments to it, to match it to the original. Then i used save for web, checking the "convert to sRGB" option. This gave me an image that looked pretty close to the original. Now i'm wondering if that would actually look right on anyone elses calibrated monitor.

    Edit: I just checked the image on my laptop (also w/ a calibrated display) and it looks pretty good. Is this the necessary solution?

    Jared:
    I wasn't assigning, i was converting

    The shift is seen in pretty much any other program (i.e. IE, Firefox, Windows viewer, windows explorer)

    I see the shift whenever i open the files in any of the above mentioned programs.

    My photoshop working profile is adobe RGB

    They were raw images that i converted to tiff (or psd.) After i re-touch and what not, i save it as a tiff or psd, and save a copy as a jpg for use on the web.

    I always use sRGB for web intended images.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2008
  7. jared_IRL

    jared_IRL OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2006
    Messages:
    17,737
    Likes Received:
    55
    got something for you to try:

    edit:

    same info, different source:

    Photoshop can effectively "SoftProof" our web browser color:
    Photoshop: View> Proof SetUp> Windows RGB
    Photoshop's Soft Proof screen preview here simulates how unmanaged applications, web browsers, will display the file on 2.2 gamma monitors, based on the sRGB profile. If the file is based on sRGB and our monitor gamma is 2.2 and D/65 6500 degrees Kelvin, we should see very little shift here, which is the goal.

    Photoshop: View> Proof SetUp> Monitor RGB
    THIS IS WHERE the color-brightness-saturation problem will repeat consistantly.
    Soft Proofing Monitor RGB here strips-ignores the embedded ICC profile and Assigns-Assumes-Applies the Monitor profile or color space.
    The color and density changes seen here show the difference between the monitor profile and the source profile sRGB.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2008
  8. dmora

    dmora Guest

    Yea mine have done that ever since Adobe CS2. :wtc: I never found a fix for it except to Save As, not Save for Web.
     

Share This Page