Crimping versus Soldering

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by spooky, Jan 17, 2005.

  1. spooky

    spooky OT Supporter

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    What do you use to hook up your radios?
     
  2. twistid

    twistid Banged By Super Models Moderator

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    we use solder at the shop... because the wire will break, before the joint will fail.
     
  3. spooky

    spooky OT Supporter

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    any write ups on the web?
     
  4. veonake

    veonake OnT poster, OT lurker

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    Crimps are fine as long as you use the proper crimp size. Usually the red tunnel crimps from radioshack. I don't really see a big reason to solder, just a big hassle for something you'll probably never notice. Not to mention there shouldn't be a lot of stress on the wiring harness so strength is not a big deal.
     
  5. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    solder & heatshrink. It's basically as time consuming as crimping, so might as well do it right.
     
  6. veonake

    veonake OnT poster, OT lurker

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    No, it's more time consuming for sure. Even if you have another person it is still more time consuming because of the time to properly solder the joint. And, why is it "more right" to solder the wiring harness? You really think it makes much of a difference?
     
  7. JDub

    JDub New Member

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    I always solder when I can. I don't want to have to worry about whether vibrations or whatnot somehow shook a crimp loose if I'm troubleshooting something. I always solder and heatshrink as well. It also makes it a little cleaner to manage when you work behind the dash when you don't have a bunch of bulky tunnel crimps in the way. I even braid the wires together before soldering. yeah, call me anal...
     
  8. twistid

    twistid Banged By Super Models Moderator

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    i've been soldering for 13 years, and can do it pretty fast. crimps can vibrate loose after time, solder won't. mechanics love to use crimps, since they use them for everything else... hmmm we fix alot of crimp jobs.
     
  9. veonake

    veonake OnT poster, OT lurker

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    That's cool, I'm 20 and have been soldering for 13 years too lol. Not sure what kind of shoddy crimp job you guys see, but I've never seen a crimp vibrate loose if it was the correct crimp type/size and properly crimped. I challenge you to solder and heat shrink two wires together more quickly than you can crimp them lol. I bet it takes half the time to crimp. Oh well, I think it really comes down to personal preference and philosophy more than which one is truly better.
     
  10. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    no, it doesn't. Soldering is better. You can argue crimping is faster, but that doesn't make anything better. Last time I checked, no shop put you in an assembly line and said "crimp crimp crimp all day long until you can't crimp no more". Crimps have a higher rate of failure -- that's a fact.
     
  11. MAD PUNK inDC

    MAD PUNK inDC Sic Semper Tyrannis

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    solder is better, but for most of what people do on this board, crimping is fine, just use the right size, and learn how to crimp properly. The only real reasons I've ever seen a crimp fail, is because it wasn't done right in the first place.
     
  12. Grouch

    Grouch Guest

    twist and tape
     
  13. DarqueGT

    DarqueGT New Member

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    soldering of course would be the better thing to do.....and provided I had the equipment here to do it all the time, I'd do it. but I can strip and crimp wires faster than letting my crap ass iron warm up. When I do an install, I crimp them using those nipple connectors. once I finish, I fold the wires over and zip tie them to ensure they won't come apart.
     
  14. twistid

    twistid Banged By Super Models Moderator

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    if you have all the wires stripped and twisted, and a good butane soldering gun it is faster than crimping... we have soldering races when we're bored at the shop. :o
     
  15. 04

    04 Guest

    I prefer soldering, because it's gas tight, and I seem to do a much better job at it than crimping ;)

    I've had both bad solder joints and bad crimps fail, but in both cases, they were poorly done. If either soldering or crimping is done well, it shouldnt be an issue of which is more reliable.
     
  16. StealthMode

    StealthMode Active Member

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    You too huh? :mamoru:
     
  17. Grouch

    Grouch Guest


    well only on my friends cars.
     
  18. Bavarian3

    Bavarian3 OT Supporter

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    .
     
  19. twistid

    twistid Banged By Super Models Moderator

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    if i was to use crimps, i'd use telephone crimps... less likely to cause a short, since it's a tight fit before you even crimp them.
     
  20. veonake

    veonake OnT poster, OT lurker

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    Telephone crimps? Don't those only accept something like 22-24awg wire? Not much use for the 14-18 awg most commonly used on harnesses, or even 12awg speaker wire. Anyway, how are you going to get a short from a tunnel crimp? The crimp would have to be smashed for that to happen, and I don't know how it would encounter such a pressure behind your dash. If we are talking uninsulated spade crimps, then of course, but you deserve shorts if you use uninsulated stuff.
     
  21. twistid

    twistid Banged By Super Models Moderator

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    i've seen it done once to attach a a deck to an adapter, and it was the best/cleanest/non-bulky crimp job i've seen.

    i've seen many crimps just pull apart, and bare wire show... they are not a solid connection by any means. you can tell our installs, from the other shop in town. ours done by me and the other installer are soldered, while the installs done by the 6 minimum wage installers at the other shop are crimped... we warranty our install for the life of the vehicle, while they give away their labor for free.
     
  22. geckoman

    geckoman OG - registered 02/01. Noobs GTFO

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    a crimp has more electrical resistance than a properly soldered connection. So if you've got any kind of amperage running through it, go with solder and shrink wrap to play it safe. Do it once, and do it right.. don't worry about it again.

    Crimping can be OK if done properly on low current circuits
     
  23. veonake

    veonake OnT poster, OT lurker

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    How much resistance do you think it has? It has to be miniscule. Where did you read that the added resistance (if even measurable) was enough to cause problems in high current situations?
     
  24. geckoman

    geckoman OG - registered 02/01. Noobs GTFO

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    Electronics classes, automotive school, and if you want something in print:
    http://www.madelectrical.com/electricaltech/amp-gauges2.shtml
     
  25. veonake

    veonake OnT poster, OT lurker

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    They still used a crimp and then added solder. Not to mention it doesn't give any hard statistics on resistance differences of proper crimps vs proper solder. I'm not saying solder doesn't provide less resistance, I just want to know by how much.
     

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