COMIC Creator Appreciation

Discussion in 'Entertainment' started by Bobbot, Aug 31, 2006.

  1. Bobbot

    Bobbot Safer than a Doombot!

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    Let's talk about some creators and their accomplishments. But first, I'm going to eat some day-old Arby's. When I'm back, we're going to discuss Mark Bagley. Discuss amongst yourselves.
     
  2. Bobbot

    Bobbot Safer than a Doombot!

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    Mark Bagley is a comic book penciller who is best known for his various works on Spider-Man and the Thunderbolts. He was born in 1957. He joined the military to fund his education at art school. When he was done, he was employed by Lockheed Martin (company that makes aircraft) to make technical drawings.

    In 1986, Marvel created a try-out contest in which contestants would submit their art on an incomplete comic. Mark Bagley was awarded grand prize and was put on a professional assignment. He had some meager beginning assignments as most newbies do.

    Mark Bagley was given a brief stint on an alternate future type comic featuring Spider-Man and Venom which caught people's eyes. As an opening was created on The Amazing Spider-Man, his mutual editor decided to give Mark Bagley a chance at the big title.

    Mark Bagley became a huge success. By the late 90's, he became known as the definitive Spider-Man artist. His artwork of Spider-Man was the one featured on merchandise everywhere.

    After a long while on Spider-Man, he began to feel...bored, like most people may become. His next project then was with the Thunderbolts, and he worked on the successful title up to issue 50.

    In 2000, Marvel was having great ideas of their Ultimate Spider-Man mini series. Naturally, they would only want the best: Mark Bagley. However, still feeling burned out on his prior work, Bagley resisted...but with great power comes great responsibility! Haha, that's supposed to be a joke. rofl at it.

    Anyway, the series experienced an incredibly unexpected degree of success and continued as an ongoing. Bagley and Bendis have been on it ever since, and currently, they are on issue 99 and are close on the heels of the record of the longest run on an ongoing comic, set by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. However, Mark Bagley has expressed that after 110 issues of Ultimate Spider-Man and one 1/2 issue for Wizard that he will leave the title. 7 years drawing the same thing...wouldn't you want some change?

    Some interesting tidbits: The average work week for Bagley on Ultimate Spider-Man is 80 hours. Okay, so I only know that one.
    edit: In 1994, a trading card set of Spider-Man (150 card set) was created, featuring art completely by Mark Bagley. The holograms are :bowdown:

    Anyway, if you want to know what his art looks like, here you go:
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    Last edited: Sep 2, 2006
  3. Bobbot

    Bobbot Safer than a Doombot!

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    Next up, I'll do another artist: Tim Sale. Tim Sale is a penciller that is somewhat linked at the hip with writer Jeph Loeb. A lot of Tim Sale's more famous work was done in conjunction with Loeb. A few of his more famous works are Batman: The Long Halloween, Batman: Dark Victory, Superman for All Seasons, Spider-Man: Blue, Daredevil: Yellow, and Hulk: Gray.

    Tim Sale's art is used in many cases as a flashback. All of the aforementioned titles are as such. The DC stories are considered "Year One" stories. The Spider-Man, Daredevil, and Hulk stories are also about the heroes' pasts.

    Currently, Tim Sale is working with the television show "Heroes" doing concept art and producing art to be depicted as the product of pre-cog artist Isaac in the show. Speaking of, the pilot for that show is available for free download September 1st 2006 on iTunes (tomorrow!).

    Some samples of his art:
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    Last edited: Sep 2, 2006
  4. Jesterkiller

    Jesterkiller ever dance with the devil in the pale moon light?

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  5. DOHChi

    DOHChi New Member

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    do jim lee next
     
  6. Bobbot

    Bobbot Safer than a Doombot!

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    kk, I'll do Jim Lee next. I need to get some writers, inkers, and colorists too, eventually though. I think I'll hit up Richard Isanove after Jim Lee.
     
  7. Bobbot

    Bobbot Safer than a Doombot!

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    Jim Lee is was born in Seoul, Korea, but grew up in America. He went to Princeton and got a degree in psychology and intended to pursue a medical career. However, the idea of comic art was sparked during school, and after his degree, he pursued art before medical.

    Lee got a few inking jobs at Marvel to start. Then, he did a few filler issues as a penciller for Uncanny X-Men in Marc Silvestri's stead. In 1990, Lee became the regular penciller and quickly developed fame. There he also collaborated with Scott Williams, who is now a long-time associate of Lee's and his inker of choice.

    Soon after, he and writer Chris Claremont launched X-Men #1 with its famous wraparound cover. In the series, they created Gambit and Omega Red. Lee also redesigned many of the costumes into what would become most familiar with most of the characters, most notably the purple ninja Psylocke.

    In 1992, Lee participated in creating Image Comics. This imprint ignored completely the Comics Code of Authority and thus displayed a higher graphic nature which was typically unseen in comics. Lee led the branch imprint of Wildstorm which produced most notably Gen13 and Wild C.A.T.S.

    Although Lee did return to Marvel for a short while, he did not stay long; he decided to focus on his Wildstorm titles. He then published The Authority, and Planetary, to try to offset the image of their line as a flashy, risque type of comic imprint.

    DC bought Wildstorm in 1998 and all rights with it. With this event, Jim Lee was freed up to do more artwork and less publishing. In 2003, Jim Lee worked with Jeph Loeb on the critically acclaimed series of 12 issues titled "Hush" on the ongoing title, Batman. Shortly after, Lee took a shot at the other flagship of DC, Superman. He worked with Brian Azzarello, and although the series did not see as much success as Hush, it still drew praise.

    Currently, Lee is working with Frank Miller on All Star Batman and Robin: The Boy Wonder and is in the process of re-launching his pet Wild C.A.T.S.

    And now, the art:

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    Last edited: Sep 2, 2006
  8. DOHChi

    DOHChi New Member

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    :bowdown: :bowdown:

    my favorite artist!! we were born in same city :wiggle:
     
  9. Bobbot

    Bobbot Safer than a Doombot!

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    Okay, now that we have 2 artists under our belt, we can focus a little attention to the less glorified job in the industry: Coloring. One thing to not is that most comics are computer-colored. The few rare ones that aren't are typically painted, like Alex Ross does.

    First off, I'll lead the colorists with Richard Isanove. This man can sell books on his good name alone. Some of his recent accomplishments include Marvel's 1602. But this man's accomplishments are more easily recognized in his cover works.

    Richard Isanove began humbly in France as a newborn child. In France, he attended an art high school, and then went on to a fine art college where he decided he didn't want to teach. After that, he went and studied art and animation for 4 years, then went to the California Institute of the Arts, the animation school created by Walt Disney. After that, he remained in the US to find a job.

    He remained in America to search for a job. He got an in from one of his friends from school at Homage studies who operates with Top Cow. They liked his paintings mostly, but he had little experience with computer coloring.

    He got to sit in and watch everyone do stuff on Photoshop until he became comfortable with it. After the art director of the coloring department left to work with Todd McFarlane on Spawn, he was offered his job. He did a lot of supervising the works of others on coloring projects.

    Most of his current works are cover pieces; mostly on Marvel titles.

    After working a little too hard as an Art Director, Isanove decided to take a different path and do a little coloring himself. He now freelances for everyone and works out of the home and receives most of his work via e-mail, ftp sites, or snail mail.

    Some of the equipment Isanove uses are a computer with a good deal of RAM, a 21-inch viewsonic, and arguably by him, his most important tool, his Wacom graphic tablet (I want one). He exclusively works with Photoshop to achieve his designs.

    And here's a few samples of his colored pieces, just to give you a grasp of his style. The first 2 are an uncolored image and then the colored image to give you a sense of the depth and texture a colorist adds:

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  10. Trungtastic

    Trungtastic OT Supporter

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    :bowdown: great thread
     
  11. DevPool

    DevPool So you like to play games, huh!?

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    I haven't read this yet, but I just wanted to say I appreciate all the threads Bobbot.

    Makes for good reading.
     
  12. Bobbot

    Bobbot Safer than a Doombot!

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    ty and yw :big grin:
     
  13. Bobbot

    Bobbot Safer than a Doombot!

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    :rofl: It seems that half of us are Korean! I think we've got enough to make a gang.
     
  14. J_Jammer

    J_Jammer New Member

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    I love that X-men cover. I have that one.
     
  15. Bobbot

    Bobbot Safer than a Doombot!

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    Guys, feel free if you want to post something informative about anyone you want, or techniques used, etc. If someone could please teach us how a Wacom tablet works, that would be awesome, because I'm too busy to wiki it...as I do this :rofl:

    Anyways, here's the next guy. It's easier to do artists, so I'll do another. Once I get the hang of this, I'll graduate to writers.

    One of the newest artists in the comic industry gathering critical praises is Gabrielle Dell'Otto. All I can find on the guy is that he's an Italian painter (which is why Secret War took so long, and the rescripting too) who does a lot of European Marvel stuff. One of his most painted subjects overseas is Wolverine. His first huge North American debut was on the project of Secret War. After that, he has been working on covers for various comics with Marvel and is currently producing the covers to Annihilation. Dell'Otto is one of the rarer breeds in the industry that does his all of the art from start to finish. Dell'Otto's style lies in the realm of realism, much like the other established comic painter, Alex Ross. However, where Ross's art makes the character fit into our perception of the world, Dell'Otto's art instead makes the our perception of the world fit the character. He accomplishes this by giving the characters very realistic yet heroic physiques while he employs an expertise in lighting and postures. These, combined with his vibrant colors, make the image stand out amongst other conventional comic art and add a different sense of fantasy to the whole notion of escapism associated with comic books. The following are samples of his art works:

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