A&P creative photography with filters

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by Ballast, Oct 21, 2003.

  1. Ballast

    Ballast Cold Heartless Bastard

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    has anyone here ever used a cokin filter? they have a lot of them at my local camera store, and some look like they give great effects. my brother harps on and on about them, but he's as new to photography as i am. any recommendations?
     
  2. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    Personally I think most of the effect filters tend to look cheesy, but beauty is in the eye of the beholder. I use a graduated ND filter in a lot of my video work, a sunset grad filter and some light fog filters from time to time. A star filter is a good addition to your camera bag but I would leave the other effects filters alone.
     
  3. LancerV

    LancerV Something Happened OT Supporter

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    I love cokin filters, mainly because they save you ALOT of money and you can take them on and off alot easier than a thread mount. Get them if they carry them instock
     
  4. Valence

    Valence Gustav Refugee

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    Conkin, never tried em, (edit ) but further investigation seems that they ARE what I have been looking for.


    For macro, you can't go without a close up filter. These can magnify 1x, 2x, 3x, 4x, 5x and 10x. It's like adding a magnifying glass to your camera.

    Polarized filter, removes glare from non mettalic objects, like water, glass, deepens the color blue that the sky has, a must for me, when I can afford it.

    UV, good to have on , removes sky haze and haze in general, good to have just to protect the lens.

    These are the filters I would use most often, however when I get back into portroits and the like, these are a must for indoors photography.

    Fluorescent Glass Filter used when you wish to correct for the greenish tone that appears when shooting daylight film under general purpose fluorescent lighting

    Black Diffusion FX Filters filters are soft focus filters. They are made with an irregular black pattern which softens smaller details, like wrinkles and skin blemishes, while leaving larger details such as the eyes sharp.

    diffusion, similar to the diffusion lens, makes everything sort of glow

    All those are good for portroits.
     
  5. I'm no pro at photography but an idea popped into my head last night while I was high. Using filters while taking pictures of the setting sun. Are there orange and darkening (like a light black) filters. What kind of effect do you think that would have? If any.
     
  6. Joe

    Joe 2015 :x: OT Supporter

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    meh, i carry a polarizer and some ND filters but i don't really use any of the gradients, colors, stars, rainbows, warming, softening, etc that cokin has...

    there was an article in pop photo last month about using various ND filters, taped on at certian angles which alot of us already do, but if you haven't tried it, you might want to take a look
     
  7. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    What you're describing is a graduated neutral density filter. These filters are quite common in cinematography use. The filters are square or retangular with one side dark fading to clear about halfway down the filter. The filters are mounted in a matte box in front of the lens. The filters can be adjusted up and down or rotated. The idea is to darken the sky while leaving the foreground normal. Since the sky is usually several stops brighter than the foreground, using a ND grad filter can improve the scene, making it appear "normal" or, by using a heavy grad filter, the sky can appear quite dramatic. There are also filters called "sunset grads" that have a bit of orange tint to the neutral density part. These filter can make a normal sky appear as a sunset, or a sunset appear really dramatic. ND grad filters come in varying strengths, usually from 1 stop all the way to 9 stops gradiant. I own three grad filters that get a lot of use in my video work.
     

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