A&P CompactFlash Cards

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by chizzle, Dec 6, 2004.

  1. chizzle

    chizzle New Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2003
    Messages:
    11,152
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    NYC
    Does it matter if I'm using high speed or normal on the nikon 5700? What's the difference?
     
  2. reinvent4

    reinvent4 Guest

    :dunno: canon>
     
  3. Easton

    Easton New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2004
    Messages:
    112
    Likes Received:
    0
    On the Nikon 5700? I seriously doubt it.

    I don't know much about P&S'ers, but the only performance affected by the speed of the card is movie writing and continuous shooting mode.

    With continuous shooting mode, the camera has it's own inbuilt RAM that collects the RAW images as they're being shot, simultaneously it processes the images and saves them as JPEG's before writing to disk (unless you specify to save as TIFF/Raw).

    So I think usually, the camera's continuous high speed shooting mode will remain the same no matter what CF card you're using (since it's just writing to the buffer).

    The difference is when the buffer is reached, because then it relies on the images to be written to the card very quickly, the faster it will write the sooner the buffer will free up more room to take more shots.

    For example, the 1DMKII has a buffer of 512MB (which for a digital camera is a bloody lot), the camera shoots raw images and writes to the 512mb buffer continuously until the buffer gets full. So it can usually store at least 44 pictures before the buffer fills up. But during this time the buffer is writing to the card, until the buffer is full.

    So basically.. with a 1DMKII, if you hold the shooting button down indefinately. It'll shoot at maximum speed (no matter what card you are using) till it fills up it's buffer... after which it'll slow down dramatically, and the speed will vary depending on the size of the images shot... and the speed of the memory card! Only then does it make a difference.

    Of course, this is only for the higher end cameras, they are all different so obviously the Nikon 5700 would have alot less internal memory to play with. It might be possible that the ram is so small that it's only large enough to fit one or two images before it has to write onto the card.... in such cases the speed of the compact flash card matters a WHOLE lot more :)

    Oh yeah.. and the other useful thing about having a fast card is that you can scroll through and preview your pictures much faster this way. And download/upload pictures onto them quicker when hooked up to your PC.

    Generally I buy reliable CF cards... I don't go for speed... but it just so happens to be that the faster cards happen to be the reliable ones as well. Usually a fast card is a good one!

    Again - this is all just MHO :)
     
  4. jTranz

    jTranz Lost in Translation

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2000
    Messages:
    23,079
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    The Ranch
    I've had horrible luck with Kingston brand cards. I personally would advise you to stay away from them.

    SanDisk and Lexar forever. :)

    Speed on the cards matter, depending on the type of shooting you do as well as your cameras ability to take advantage of the cards speed by being able to write at those speeds.
     
  5. reinvent4

    reinvent4 Guest

    the lexar 80x proseries are the bomb
     

Share This Page