A&P Can someone explain the aperture settings to me?

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by vibrantglow, Jul 27, 2002.

  1. vibrantglow

    vibrantglow Guest

    :confused: Thanks in advance...

    For example f/3.2

    What exactly does that mean/do as compared to...f/5.0
     
  2. fade

    fade tie your shoe bitch

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    lets in more light at f/3.2
     
  3. jinushaun

    jinushaun New Member

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    Reference: Aperture

    An aperture is essentially a hole or an opening. In a camera, however, an aperture is an opening in the lens' diaphragm. By varying the diameter of the aperture, you control the amount of light passing through the lens into the camera to expose the film. The size of the aperture (opening) is represented by numerically-identified ƒ-stops. Basic ƒ-stop numbers are 1, 1.4, 2, 2.8, 4, 5.6, 8, 11, 16, 22, 32, 45, 64 and 90.

    It seems contradictory but is important for you to remember that a larger ƒ-stop number designates a smaller lens opening, and vice-versa. For example, an aperture of ƒ/22 is a very small lens opening, whereas an aperture of ƒ/1.4 is a relatively huge opening, and will let a great deal more light pass through the lens.

    ƒ-stop numbers are based on a standard geometric scale. Each ƒ-stop is precisely engineered to let in twice as much light as the next smaller ƒ-stop, and half as much light as the next larger one.

    Go here for more info: http://www.photographytips.com/. Don't be fooled by its cute and cartoony appearence, it's actually very informative and in depth.
     
  4. jinushaun

    jinushaun New Member

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    A corollary to aperture and f-stops is depth of field.

    A large aperture (wide opening, small f-stop) will yield a "shallow" depth of field. This means that a very narrow range is in focus. You've probably seen those pictures where one object is in focus and the background and foreground are extremely blurry. The opposite works when the aperture is small (small opening, large f-stop); the depth of field is "deep". This means that everything is in focus.
     
  5. fade

    fade tie your shoe bitch

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    hence, compared to f/5.0, it lets more light in :fawk:



    but i admit, your response was much better.
     
  6. and has a longer depth of field :)
     
  7. fade

    fade tie your shoe bitch

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    werd:o

    also, longer depth of field can be accomplished by using telephoto lenses.
     

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