GUN Can anyone explain to me different calibers?

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by Gundam, Aug 28, 2004.

  1. Gundam

    Gundam Tell Drama he's on my to do list, right after inse

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2000
    Messages:
    32,299
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Sacramento, CA
    For example .45, 9mm, 7.62X39 etc. What do these numbers designate?
     
  2. Platinum_Thunder

    Platinum_Thunder Reliability for life and liberty

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2001
    Messages:
    108,826
    Likes Received:
    194
    1st number is diameter of the round... .45 is 45/100 of and inch...9mm etc is the same, just metric....second number is the length
     
  3. ShackleMeNot

    ShackleMeNot MINDSET

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2003
    Messages:
    1,925
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    MINDSET
    Measurements for diameter and length.

    9mm is 9 millimeters in diameter. When most people say 9mm they mean 9 x 19. There are also other 9mm calibers such as 9 x 18, 9 x 21 and 9 x 25.
    .45 is 45 caliber. Calibers are fraction of inches. .45 is .05 less than half an inch.
    .45 also comes in different length. You can have .45 ACP or the new .45 GAP or older cartridges such as .45-70 which is a rifle cartridge.

    Make sense?
     
  4. 7

    7 First comes smiles, then lies. Last is gunfire.

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2002
    Messages:
    25,055
    Likes Received:
    0
    You shouldnt say that because then he might think thats true with every cartridge :o
     
  5. Platinum_Thunder

    Platinum_Thunder Reliability for life and liberty

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2001
    Messages:
    108,826
    Likes Received:
    194
    Well,, if it's somelike like 7.62x39 is it
     
  6. Jago

    Jago It helps if you hit it.

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2000
    Messages:
    27,965
    Likes Received:
    0
    Handgun Calibers:

    [​IMG]

    .22 rimfire (.22 Long Rifle)
    This .22 inch caliber round is one of the few rimfire cartridges to retain its popularity to the present day (rimfire differing from centerfire by having the primer, which is struck to ignite the gun powder, around the edge of the rim). The 22 rimfire is mostly used for plinking and varminting but its small size makes it ideal for concealable revolvers and pistols. Its report is quiet, its recoil almost nonexistent, and its wounding power generally underestimated. The standard .22 rimfire launches a 36 grain projectile at 1090 feet per second (332 m/s).


    .32 Auto (.32 ACP, 7.65 Auto)
    The diminuitive .32 Auto was introduced at the turn of the century in 1899. Many consider it the smallest caliber pistol round adequate for self-defense. While lacking in power, its small size (.308 inches) makes it ideal for compact pistols. Typical .32 Autos fire a 71 grain bullet at 905 feet per second (276 m/s).


    .380 Auto (9mm Short, 9x17mm, 9mm Kurz, 380 ACP)
    Light and handy, the .380 Auto is a very popular caliber for concealed autoloaders. It packs more of a punch than the .32 Auto, but is still thought of as less than a full-power round. Its .355 inch 90 grain bullet travels at around 1000 feet per second (305 m/s).

    9mm Auto (9mm Luger, 9x19mm Parabellum)
    Introduced in 1902, the 9mm has grown to become one of the most popular handgun cartridges in the world. It is thought of as one the smallest rounds considered a "full-size" cartridge. The 9mm's thin profile (.355 in) allows high capacity in automatics chambered for it. The standard 9mm round fires a 124 grain bullet at 1155 feet per second (352 m/s).


    .38 Special (.38 S&W Special)
    Once very widely used, the .38 Special does not have quite the popularity it had in the middle of the 20th century. This cartridge went public in 1902 and became the standard police caliber for decades. In terms of power it is overshadowed by its big brother the .357, but still considered a respectable manstopper. Average .38 Specials fire a 140 grain bullet at 900 fps (274 m/s).


    .357 Magnum
    When developed in 1935 by Smith & Wesson, the .357 Magnum was the most powerful handgun cartridge in the world. It has since grown to become probably the most popular high-velocity round in America. This is a flat-shooting, hard-hitting cartridge that is commonly used in hunting as well as self-defense and combat. The standard bullet in this caliber weighs 165 grains and travels at 1290 feet per second (393 m/s).

    .40 Auto (.40 S&W)
    The .40 Auto was introduced by Smith & Wesson in 1989. The idea was to provide a cartridge similar to the 10mm, but with reduced power in a shorter case. It hits nearly as hard as the .45 ACP, but recoils only slightly more than the 9mm. The typical .40 Auto launches a 155 grain projectile at 1200 fps (365 m/s).


    10mm Auto
    This powerhouse cartridge is a real kicker, one of the reasons for its general lack of popularity. It was shortly adopted by the FBI after its introduction in 1983, but in a reduced load. It is similar to the .40 Auto in all ways but length and power. On average, the 10mm bullet weighs 180 grains and speeds at 1180 feet per second (360 m/s).


    .44 Magnum (.44 Remington Magnum)
    For years, this round held the title as the world's most powerful handgun cartridge after unseating the .357 Magnum. The .44 Magnum has very high penetration, but has equally high recoil. Though not a very common self-defense/combat caliber, it is popular in handgun hunting and target shooting because of its rather flat trajectory. The standard .44 Magnum launches a 240 grain bullet at 1375 feet per second (419 m/s).


    .45 Auto (.45 ACP)
    The .45 Auto is more popular than ever, over 90 years since its introduction in 1905. This caliber is proof that those things done well endure. The .45 is celebrated for the stopping power caused by its relatively wide cross-section and slow, heavy bullet, as well as its match-level accuracy. Recoil can be rough on the novice shooter however. Typically, the .45 Auto shoots a 230 grain slug at 880 feet per second (268 m/s).


    .454 Magnum (.454 Casull)
    The .454 stole the .44 Magnum's thunder as the world's most powerful handgun cartridge in 1959. It has proven to be an effective large-game hunting round, with its incredible penetration. It's also used in long distance target shooting, because of the flat trajectory of its high velocity bullet: a 300 grain bullet moving at 1625 fps (495 m/s).


    .475 Magnum (.475 Linebaugh)
    Reigning king of the handgun is the .475 Magnum round. Announced in 1988, it is intended primarily for hunting big, dangerous game animals. Its fearsome recoil really precludes it as a combat round, though its extreme power could cut through nearly any body armor available. The 370 grain slug of the .454 Magnum travels at a speed of 1500 feet per second (457 m/s).


    .50 Magnum (.50 Action Express)
    In the realm of the automatic pistol, no caliber tops the .50 Magnum. It kicks like a mule at both ends, but is considered a highly accurate round, for target, hunting, or combat. Standard .50 Magnums accelerate a 325 grain bullet to 1400 fps (427 m/s).



    Rifle Calibers:

    [​IMG]

    4.73mm Caseless

    The dream of caseless ammunition was made reality with the advent of solid-form propellants that could withstand higher chamber temperatures without spontaneously igniting. In the early 1980's, the 4.73mm Caseless round was introduced as one of the first viable caseless rounds. The lack of a casing to eject allows for higher firing rates as well as simpler, more reliable internal operation. The 4.73mm Caseless fires a 52 grain slug at 3200 feet per second (976 m/s).


    5.56mm Military (5.56mm NATO, 5.56x45mm, .223 Remington)
    First appearing in an experimental role in 1957, the 5.56mm eventually became the official caliber of the United States and NATO military forces, replacing the 7.62mm Mil. It met extensive field testing during the conflict in Viet Nam and the rest of the cold war. The typical 5.56mm round is 64 grains, travelling at 3020 fps (920 m/s).


    .270 Rifle (.270 Winchester)

    The .270 has become one of the most popular American hunting calibers since its introduction in 1925. Though light, its high velocity gives it a flat trajectory, and the round's accuracy is well respected. A standard .270 launches a 130 grain bullet at 3060 fps (932 m/s).


    .30-30 Rifle (30-30 WCF, .30 Winchester, 7.62x51Rmm)
    The .30-30 derives its name from its caliber (.30 inch) and the amount of powder the original blackpowder cartridge used (30 grains). From 1895 on, the .30-30 has gathered a reputation as the standard American deer cartridge. Standard .30-30 rounds fire a 150 grain bullet at 2390 fps (728 m/s).


    7mm Magnum (7mm Remington Magnum)
    This is a well regarded long-range, big game hunting round. Introduced in 1962, it is capable of taking any North America and many African game animals. The 175 grain bullet of the 7mm Magnum speeds along at a rate of 2860 feet per second (871 m/s).


    7.62mm Soviet (7.62x39mm Soviet)
    The 7.62mm Soviet became the standard military round for the Soviet forces in 1943 and served as such until 1974. As new and used Soviet-style rifles became available outside of the Iron Curtain, the 7.62mm Soviet become a popular sporting round in the United States. Its mild recoil makes it controllable in automatic fire, launching 125 grain projectiles at 2350 fps (716 m/s).


    7.62mm Military (7.62x51mm, 7.62mm NATO, .308 Winchester)
    Militaries all over the world have made use of the hard-hitting power of the 7.62mm Mil. Even though replaced (supplemented, really) by the 5.56mm as the official NATO round in the 1960's, it is still in continuous use by police and armed forces as the premiere sniper cartridge. Adequate for most all North American game, it is also a favorite of target shooters because of its excellent accuracy. The standard 7.62mm Mil fires a 180 grain slug at 2625 fps (800 m/s).


    .300 Magnum (.300 Winchester Magnum)
    Another popular hunting cartridge, the .300 Magnum also occasionally found chambered in police and military sniper rifles as well. It was introduced in 1963 and been used as a long-range big game hunting caliber ever since. A typical bullet of this caliber weighs 200 grains and travels at 2825 feet per second (861 m/s).


    .416 Magnum (.416 Remington Magnum)
    The big-bore .416 Magnum was designed to take down the most dangerous of African game animals. It was announced in 1988, and can be found with a 410 grain round nosed bullet launched at a speed of 2370 fps (722 m/s).


    .50 Military (.50 Browning Machine Gun, .50 BMG)
    This monster of a personal caliber was adopted into the American military service in 1918 for the heavy machinegun. Beyond its role as a machinegun round for decades, it is also commonly used in sniper rifles because of its amazingly long range. Some confirmed kills have been taken to almost two miles away, and its effective range in automatic fire is even further. Long distance target shooting also makes use of the .50 Military round chambered in very heavy single shot or semi-automatic rifles. The typical .50 Military fires a huge 720 grain slug at 2810 fps (856 m/s).
     
  7. 7

    7 First comes smiles, then lies. Last is gunfire.

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2002
    Messages:
    25,055
    Likes Received:
    0
    30-06 got the 06 because it was designed in 1906, 25-06 gets its 06 because it uses a necked-down 30-06 case, 45-70 originally used 70 grains of black powder, .22-250 gets the 250 from using a case from a .250-3000 Savage which gets 3000 because it drove a .25 bullet at 3000fps, and the list goes on.
     
  8. Gundam

    Gundam Tell Drama he's on my to do list, right after inse

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2000
    Messages:
    32,299
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Sacramento, CA
    Very :cool: guys. The explanation was easier then I thought. :)
     

Share This Page