GUN Calling your shots, blinking, and other things

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by Soybomb, Mar 3, 2008.

  1. Soybomb

    Soybomb New Member

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    I feel like one of my biggest problems to becoming a better shooter is that I still can't reliably call my shots. I try to follow my front sight during recoil but I can't break the blinking. I've tried double plugging and that doesn't seem to really help much. What do the competition shooters here suggest? Is it just a matter of being a higher volume shooter? Even dry firing I find it almost impossible to not blink.

    Next do you have any genearl tips for how to shoot a gun with a heavier trigger like a DA/SA on the first shot slightly better? I shoot from the reset and don't find the transition from one to the other to bother me but I find it really hard to not disrupt my sight picture when it breaks after that heavy pull. A DA revolver is much different because it feels like there's stacking and the trigger can be prepped and broken much easier. A DA auto feels more like trying to control your hands after you stretch a rubber band to its breaking point to me.

    Finally, and here's where I sound like a crack pot, is there anything like too lazy to be dominant eyes? :big grin: My right eye is my dominant eye by all measures but if I'm shooting with both eyes open I notice something it seems like it "clicks over" to my left eye. I go from having this nice sight picture focused on the front sight down the channel to seeing the front sight to the left of the rear, essentially what I would be seeing with my right eye closed. A quick blink of the left eye bring it back then a second or two later it shifts again. its quite maddening :big grin:
     
  2. hsmith

    hsmith OT Supporter

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    My biggest problem is I anticipate the shot and blink BEFORE i pull the trigger occasionally, this throws me off the most while shooting
     
  3. AB13

    AB13 New Member

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    Rather than recreate the wheel, here's a post from one of my mentors that'll help.

    Brian Enos

     
  4. GlobeGuy

    GlobeGuy New Member

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    Calling your shot, does that mean knowing where your round went without seeing the hole in the target? If yes, I can't do that. I shoot with both eyes open and I do not blink when I fire. I have about 2200 rounds under my belt and I believe I was able to not blink when firing at around 1500 round mark. So I do not believe it's a high volume thing.

    I experience similiar thing after each shot and focus ahead to check the target:
    1. I pull the trigger
    2. Gun's front sight no longer in focus, the gun is blurry and to the LEFT of the sight like you mentioned (Because the picture of the gun has move the left, I know when the slide has locked back visually) and the target is in focus.
    3. I see the new hole being punched in the target
    4. Front sight comes back to my original POA and front sight is in focus again and the target is blurry.

    But I do not have to blink to get the sight picture back in focus.
     
  5. sprite

    sprite Active Member

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    Yeah, Brian Enos' book "Practical Shooting: Beyond Fundamentals" and his forum addresses these types of issues to a "T" and I'd definitely recommend his book for people looking to address the "mental" aspects of shooting.

    With regard to blinking specifically (this tip came from Enos too) one of the few things that really helped me was starting off practice sessions just dropping a mag or two into the berm... don't aim at anything, and don't focus on the sights... just be "aware" of the gun. I have no idea why but this works. I still struggle with it though, and usually will find myself blinking again before the end of a practice or match, but this technique definitely helps and I'm hoping that in time I'll need to do it less often.
     
  6. AB13

    AB13 New Member

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    Eye dominance is dictated by my target, distance. For the most part, all of my work from 10 yards in is "BEO" which has helped with my splits. For longer shots, I will switch over to my dominant eye, which is my left.

    Pick a spot on the target, then find your sights and then depress the trigger.

    As for fighting the flinches. That's just more and more dry fire/live fire practice. If you are still flinching from dry firing, you have a little ways. As it appears you are bringing over that bad habit from live fire practice.

    To be perfectly honest, I don't know exactly how I got over it. It's been some time. Just practice your fundamentals and it will one day "click". Everything looks "slo mo" to me now. It's not until I watch my videos do I realize how fast I'm really moving.

    It's just repetition of "target picture" is all. My gun to me, is just like an extension of myself. Like a long arm and fist. It's sort of hard to explain. I can adjust my next shot judging off feedback from my first. When I'm point shooting, I do this subconsiously.
     
  7. sprite

    sprite Active Member

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    I never experienced the "dominance shifting" you seem to be describing, but I did used to have lots of problems with double-vision as I transitioned from target focus to sight focus & vice-versa.

    I used the "tape on the weak-eye lens" of my shooting glasses trick for a few weeks during dry fire and it pretty much eliminated that problem altogether... don't know if it would have a similar effect in your situation or not.
     
  8. AB13

    AB13 New Member

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    That's actually excellent advise I've done with great success. Maybe you should not be so "target focused" (as stupid as it sounds in regards to target shooting). Get in groove with the gun, how it recoils, and everything else.

    How about, next time out, don't set up a target. Rather, shoot your gun, and pay attention to your gun, and how it's recoiling.
     
  9. AB13

    AB13 New Member

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    Let me guess by saying you are missing low and left on your first shot? Do you change grip pressure through out the trigger break sequence? Because you shouldn't. I think of my grip, and my trigger finger different entities entirely.

    Most people that have issues "anticipating" will change their grip pressure to extremely tight grip just before they depress the trigger, preparing for the recoil and will sometimes push the gun forward to compensate, which drops their barrel low.

    The pressure you should keep on your grip was explained to me as "like holding a greased egg. Strong enough to hold it, but not too much that you crack the egg."

    penny on the barrel trick.

    Balance a penny on the barrel, and learn to break the shot without disrupting the penny. :)

    For live fire, have a friend place a snap cap in the mag somewhere and load it for you.

    When you break the shot, it's good that it sometimes "surprises you". But you have to learn not to "compensate" for it.
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2008
  10. GlobeGuy

    GlobeGuy New Member

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    I agree with the "click". It's alot like a golf swing. You take your lessons and try to make that sound swing and things are out of sync...for a long time. And in one practice session everything clicks and you make that ideal swing. Your body has now _experienced_ THE swing. It is now better equipped to reproduce that swing because it has experienced it at least once.

    I remember when I had that "click" at the range. I was afraid of that "click" going away on my next shot, not allowing me to experience it over and over again, but it stayed with me for the duration of that session, and I was able to ingrain that feeling into my body.
     

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