Calf....Searing....Pain....

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by Zoomba, Feb 24, 2005.

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  1. Zoomba

    Zoomba New Member

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    Somewhere in the middle of the night, my left foot snapped up and my calf suddenly caused me absolute searing pain.

    This is nothing new, it's happened before, but not to this magnitude or length. It must have been about 3 mins before the pain even started to subside.

    I reached down to give it a bit of a massage to see if that would help it, and I felt a golf ball sized knot in my calf muscle. This freaked me out a bit. As per normal after it happens, I can't walk pain-free all the time, just depends on how I walk, and if my calf gets stretched at all.

    Any idea what could be causing these?
     
  2. blink 17

    blink 17 New Member

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    charlie horse
     
  3. D

    D A guiltless state of self awareness.. The process

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    Oh, I hope someone has some good info for this.
    I've been waking up w/serious calf cramps/charlie horses, lately. I drink lots of water, & take potassium. It really is painful, especially when that's what wakes you up.
     
  4. Ilyusha

    Ilyusha Guest

  5. Z PYRATE

    Z PYRATE Guest

    woah, I figured they were just cramps...

    thats happened to me a few times, not in the past 6 months or so though
     
  6. Ceaze

    Ceaze https://hearthis.at/DoYouEvenUplift Moderator

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    Provided there are no neurological or neurodegenerative causes, extra calcium is usually the solution for muscle spasms or muscle cramps in many nocturnal cases. The extra requirements for calcium may be a result of high protein or phosphate levels (kidney disease, poor diet), hormonal diseases or imbalances, nutritional imbalances (high Mg/Ca ratio, low pantothenic acid), celiac disease or other intestinal conditions that interfere with calcium absorption, prescribed medications that promote calcium loss, random self-supplementation of the wrong vitamins and minerals, and others.

    When high calcium is suspected but no resources are available to measure cellular calcium levels (serum calcium cannot be used for that purpose), an acidifying approach may be tried such as taking a very large amount of Vitamin C for a few days. If the muscle spasms or cramps get worse, then at least one can assume that calcium was likely on the low side, and one needs to increase its dietary intake, and/or use calcium supplementation. If on the other hand the muscle cramps or spasms improve, then calcium is likely too high and requires co-factors to make it more bioavailable by supplementing either magnesium, or a phosphorus source such as lecithin, a higher daily intake of Vitamin C, or one could increase one's protein intake as
    another option.

    One-sided leg cramps or spasms can help with the decision of what to supplement, whereby the left side is usually indicative of calcium, while the right side is generally an indication of magnesium being needed, although some individuals require a calcium / magnesium combination for relief as a result of both being low.
     
  7. D

    D A guiltless state of self awareness.. The process

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    Thankyou folks for all the info. Hmm, I wonder if my untreated hiatal hernia could be related to this?
    Next month I'll be treating that. In the meantime maybe I'll have to pick up some calcium citrate w/ magnesium.
     
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