buying a laptop: reasons to consider apple? else, which pc manufacturer?

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by 01000101, Dec 21, 2004.

  1. 01000101

    01000101 New Member

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    I already have a desktop pc thats all modded, so im fine with windows, but i was considering trying out mac if there were enough reasons that appealed to me. i also want to learn linux, but having never used it before, i dont know if it works on both mac and pc hardware achitecture. i plan to just use it for school and to keep myself entertained at work.

    if you dont think i should get a mac, let me know why and suggest a manufacturer of laptop pcs based on your experience with dependabilty, costumer service, etc.


    thanks so much!
     
  2. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    I am going to order a 12" PowerBook soon (gotta fight the urge to order now, and wait until MacWorld and they announce new models).

    Go to a CompUSA or similar store and mess around with a PowerBook. If you like it, get it. If you don't, then don't.

    Linux runs on pretty much all hardware (mac and PC alike). However, if you buy a mac, I'd stick with OSX. It's based on BSD.

    If you go with a PC, do not get Dell/IBM/Toshiba/Fujitsu/HP/Compaq/other. They're all pretty much junk. Despite seemingly-popular belief, I like the Gateway notebooks. I also think the ASUS notebooks are a great value.
     
  3. Apothis

    Apothis New Member

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    First off, I should mention that there are VERSIONS of linux that run on both pc and mac, but the same one won't run on both. It comes down to the different types of cpu they use (pc=x86, mac=ppc). But yes, there are both x86 and ppc distros of linux available.

    Now from personal experience, I like my ibook a lot. It was my first laptop and I got it several months ago. I've worked with laptops a good bit between my current and previous jobs. As far as I'm concerned, every wintel laptop I've used/worked on sucked. I mean, I guess they'd do in a pinch, but I'd never want to invest in one myself.

    I have moderate experience with linux, but I really really wanted to become aquainted with OS X. So I went and got a 12" ibook. All I really wanted was the OS, couldn't care less about the hardware. Though I must admit, I do have a growing appreciation for how nice the hardware is, especially compared to the wintel stuff I work with. A 1Ghz ibook might not sound like much, but it's more than competetive vs junky 3Ghz dells at work. It's definitely true that you can't directly compare the numbers/ghz/ect. I'd also say the performance is a lot more consistent than pc.

    OS X is where it's really at though. No matter how nice the hardware might be, the os is really something else. It has tons of neat tricks you can do that windows lacks, or are otherwise being lifted for Longhorn. Being familar with linux, I do see a lot of unix similarities. This is, of course, a good thing. It's been said that Apple did the impossible: made a gui for the unix kernel that was actually user-friendly. And it's true apparently. Linux is great and all, I have trendous admiration for it. But it's just not "there" yet, in terms of being a desktop replacement for the average user. OS X, however, is I would say. You can tell they've bent over backwards to create this killer os. This is definitely the kind of thing linux should aspire to. Also, something that both linux and os x have going for them is a journaled file system. Simply put: this rocks. Much greater fault tolrance in case of a crash (or power-outage), and it's basially self-maintaining. Unlike windohs, it automatically keeps all its ducks in a row ..so to speak.

    I'm gonna have to second jollyogre about going to a compusa and trying it out. It's always a good idea to get a little hands-on with something before taking the plunge. I plan to get a new mac of some sort after Tiger comes out
     
  4. MrMan

    MrMan New Member

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    I'm surprised IBM made that list, I thought they were one of the best, durable laptops. One reason not to get the Mac is software availability is limited. Yea, they have those software that emulates a PC and allows you to run some PC software, but they are not perfect. Apple still wants a closed proprietary system.
     
  5. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    I haven't had an issue with mac not supporting what I need. Even the gaming community is growing for the mac.

    what do you like to run that the mac doesn't allow?

    As for IBM, yes, I consider it unacceptable. I have a family member that works for IBM, and he's forced to use IBM hardware... Definitely does not live up to the "durable" name that they have.
     
  6. Penguin Man

    Penguin Man Protect Your Digital Liberties

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    Yes and no. While they're not exactly the same, most of the popular distributions (SuSE, Ubuntu, etc) offer both PPC and x86 versions, so you're getting exactly the same thing for either system, they're just compiled for different systems.

    As for the thread itself, I pretty much agree with jollyogre here :)noes: ). IMO, Apple is the only way to go for a notebook, the PowerBooks are awesome, and even the cheap iBooks are very high quality and look purty. I've never had a problem with software compatibility (other than mainstream games, although they're becoming more available) on Linux or OSX, it really hasn't been a problem in years. However, I would recommend IBM if you don't want a Mac, they're really quite good in my experience.
     
  7. Apothis

    Apothis New Member

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    For that, I only meant you can't take a single version (say x86), and have it "work" on both x86 and ppc. At that point, there had been no mention really of the difference in cpus, and it had been implied that "Linux runs on pretty much all hardware (mac and PC alike)" ...which I felt needed some clarification.
     
  8. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    but linux does run on pretty much all hardware... the same that can be said where "java runs on pretty much all hardware".

    That says nothing of needing a different JRE for each platform. Simply that it can, and has been done.

    Considering that you cannot insert a Windows CD into a mac and install it, and you cannot insert an OSX CD into a PC and install it (without emulators, on either end) then I figure it's pretty obvious that you may need a different build of linux per-platform.

    hey, why won't my telephone line plug into the power outlet?
     
  9. Apothis

    Apothis New Member

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    Of course it'll run on anything it was made to run on. But the point is, for someone not really familiar with linux or mac, there is a very good chance they wouldn't even be aware of the different types of cpus or their importance. It would have just been a shame for him to, say, download all 4 disks of FDC3-x86 only to find out it wont natively run on his new apple. It's the sort of thing that would be best understood beforehand, and it just "sounded" like you were saying any linux will run on any hardware, which would be misleading for teh technoobs. Now I don't know what exactly the OP already knew, but you know what they say about assumptions...
    :hsd:
     
  10. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    yes yes...

    Although I'm also a firm believer of starting a spark, but then having the person go find out the rest. I think if you're seriously interested in running linux, you should at least go to various distro's sites and read up as much as you can...

    But, alas, this rarely happens.
     

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