business detailers, how are you removing swirls? your exterior detail steps?

Discussion in 'That'll Buff Right Out' started by quamen, Nov 15, 2003.

  1. quamen

    quamen New Member

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    I just joined here, and have ben detailing for a few years now, and im planning
    on opening a mobile detailing business in the summer. I had one before,but also had a good job at the same time, so i didnt detail everyday. When i detailed it seemed like i always did the worked by machine and all to heat up that paint and save time.

    How do u guys go about doing your jobs? it really is almost impossible to remove
    swirls without a buffer since no heat is involved, so they will not be removed but rather hidden by products. Yeah the finish may look great, but they will return.

    So say u have a job what are ur exterior detail steps?

    I like to do the obvious which is: Prep wash car, see what im dealing with
    on the paint, mask and dress trim, dress tires and wheel wells, rejuvenate paint, by high speed for swirls using a rotary, then a da for polishing and a wax using by hand. then do my other surfaces. wheels, chrome, windows and then my final inspection
     
  2. Jackhole

    Jackhole New Member

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    That's not true. I have removed swirls (not just covered them up) from vehicles with no buffer, many times on a few different cars. It can be done, in fact it's done all the time by most of the people who post here.

    For a thread on swirl removal, check here:
    http://forums.offtopic.com/showthread.php?t=782150
     
  3. gandhibrokemyskates

    gandhibrokemyskates slangin beer

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    I've done it by hand..and the swirls were gone!
     
  4. quamen

    quamen New Member

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    yeah but that process takes so much longer and more work on yourself
     
  5. gandhibrokemyskates

    gandhibrokemyskates slangin beer

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    meh, people i know like the thought of doing everything by hand instead of with machine
     
  6. Scottwax

    Scottwax Making detailing great again! Moderator

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    True, but I've had my mobile detailing business for about 11 years (full time for almost 10) and I've always worked by hand. After all this time, it is pretty easy for me, but if I had to start now, I'd use a PC and a rotary. Probably going to get a PC because newer paints are so much harder than in the early 90's when I started off. My first high end customer (whose cars I started detailing in January of '94 and still do his cars) told me he never wanted to see a buffer near his cars (too many bad experiences with dealers), so I learned how to remove swirls by hand, and believe me, I can generate some heat when buffing by hand with terry cloth towels...good upper body workout too! No masking off trim either.

    I'd recommend that anyone who is going into detailing full time at least get a PC. If you regularly work with rough paint (like used car lot and auction cars) then a rotary is probably necessary also. For the average weekend detailer who takes care of cars that are well maintained and have few surface defects, you can probably get by doing cars by hand.

    When I detail cars, I start with the interior-vacuum and clean the carpets, seats, vinyl, etc, then I wash the car, clay if needed, use the necessary polishing/glazing steps, wax, clean the windows inside and out, dress the interior, then the wheels and wheel wells.
     

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