Book Review (not my review)

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by size18boarder, Oct 29, 2007.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. size18boarder

    size18boarder rhetorical OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2003
    Messages:
    4,543
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    baltimore, md
    Title: Muscles, Speed, and Lies: What the Sport Supplement Industry Does Not Want Athletes or Consumers to Know, 1st Edition

    Author: Lightsey, David

    Reviewed By: Karen Kritsch, PhD, RD
    Excerpt from October Journal of American College of Sports Medicine

    Description: This book will enlighten readers about the murky world of the sports supplement industry. Readers will be surprised at the steps that the $16 Billion dollar supplement industry takes to sell their products. According to the author, this involves misrepresenting research, the addition of banned substances, inaccurate marketing, incorrect product labeling, lobbying congress for protective legislation, and misleading consumers and athletes.
    Purpose: The author's purpose is threefold: first, to expose the sport supplement industry's history of deciet and greed; second, to educate athlete consumers on the science behind vitamins, carbohydrates, protein, antioxidants, and other supplements; and finally to give athlete-consumers ways to apply the information to their lives.
    Audience: This book is essential reading for the interested athlete or coach. Particularly, it should be required reading for those studying in the field of clinical sports science (grads, undergrads), allied health professionals (ATCs, personal trainers, dietitians), and primary care sports medicine physicians.
    Features: Tihs book reflects the author's view that the sports supplement industry is a large business that is nont necessarily cocncerned about health, safety, truth, or honesty. The book systematically presents the complex muths and realities about vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, protein, and carbohydrates. The author ends with recommendations. The list of resources, references, and index are extensive.
    Assessment: This well-written book discusses eloquently the science of nutrition and the myths revolving around the supplement industry. The author accomplishes the difficult task of addressing two different groups with the book: the athlete and the educated sports science/sports medicine student.
     
  2. size18boarder

    size18boarder rhetorical OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2003
    Messages:
    4,543
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    baltimore, md
    Looks interesting, thought I would type up the review for you guys. If anyone has read it please give a review.
     
  3. MaineSucks

    MaineSucks OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2005
    Messages:
    39,645
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    954
    I'll bet it comes down to:

    - 95% of people don't need the supplements that are marketed towards them.
    - If it can't be injected, it sucks (or if it isn't related to something being injected, it sucks)
    - A list of recommended supplements that went to the highest bidder
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page