Bimmer Crew: what years were the v8's nikasil blocks?

Discussion in 'OT Driven' started by Dr. Fuckface, Jan 30, 2007.

  1. Dr. Fuckface

    Dr. Fuckface Wheelguns: when it absolutely, positively has to g

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    and how do I go about verifying the block has been replaced? BMW NA or some such?
     
  2. ZCP M3

    ZCP M3 Active Member

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    IIRC, all of the 4.4L V8's were nikasil. I know the M62 in my 2000 540i was. Any BMW dealership should be able to look up the history of your car from your VIN# and tell you all the warranty work that has been completed.
     
  3. MP525i

    MP525i New Member

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    94-97 i think. not 100% positive on this though.

    the e34 530's, 540's and e32 740, e38 740's had this problem. i think they went to the alusil blocks in 98.

    can someone verify this?
     
  4. ZCP M3

    ZCP M3 Active Member

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    Heres your answer:
    most of the M60's (used from 92-95) had nikasil linings.

    BMW used Nikasil, an aluminium, nickel, and silicon alloy, to line the cylinders of the M60 engines. The cross-hatched Nikasil linings react with the high sulfur content found in lower-quality gasoline, such as that used in parts of the United States. This reaction causes damage to the very top of the cylinder bore, where there is the most contact of the burning mixture and the cylinder lining. The damage prevents a good seal from forming between the piston and the cylinder wall, causing a loss of compression in the combustion chamber. This "leak down" will cause M60s with worn linings to exhibit a rough idle, and if the problem continues unchecked, the engine will not start.

    The only permanent fix for this problem is the replacement of the short block with the equivalent block using Alusil linings, which do not exhibit this corrosion problem. After the problem was found, BMW issued an extended six-year, 100,000-mile (160,000 km) warranty to cover these engines at no cost to the owner.

    The composition of the engine can be found by checking the serial number stamped into the engine block:

    M60B30:

    1 725 970 - Nikasil
    1 741 212 - Nikasil
    1 745 871 - Alusil
    M60B40:

    1 725 963 - Nikasil
    1 742 998 - Nikasil
    1 745 872 - Alusil

    The successor to the M60, the M62 has an Alusil block.
     
  5. Necromancer

    Necromancer Guest

    Ah, so this is why I've been told to stay away from the m60 v8. Very cool, thank you for the information.
     
  6. ZCP M3

    ZCP M3 Active Member

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    Noobs can provide useful information every once in a while! :hsd:
     
  7. riot

    riot Guest

    I have known people that have never had the block replaced and have never had a problem. Then again I've heard horror stories too. Rule of thumb is don't buy it unless they have proof that it was replaced by the dealer. Unless you wanna use the fact that they dont have it documented as leverage for bargaining.
     

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