SRS Bi-Polar Disorder

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by essense, Sep 20, 2005.

  1. essense

    essense New Member

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    Am I crazy for not being on medication and trying to deal with this disorder? I have just been so afriad of meds since i saw my older sister go through a year and half of hell trying to find the right medication for her when she came out of rehab. I took depakote for a very limited period of time, but threw the bottle away after taking about 12 of them in a drunken stupor and then feeling brain dead for the next 2 days.

    I've just become really unable to manage my life the past 6 months and the suicidal thoughts are incessant, much worse when I drink... but always there regardless. I just can't get my life stable for any period of time longer than 3-4 months.

    Is there anyplace for free help or guidance for mental health?
     
  2. UnOriginal

    UnOriginal Corki Bucheck

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    start back on your medication. It's not fun to be someone who is bi-polar and off meds, and not fun to live with a bi-polar person who is off of their meds..
     
  3. RUchaps

    RUchaps Active Member

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    Study: Routine Eases Bipolar Disorder
    Study Finds Maintaining a Daily Routine Helps Bipolar Sufferers Avoid Relapses
    By JENNIFER C. YATES Associated Press Writer
    The Associated Press

    Sep. 8, 2005 - Patients suffering from bipolar disorder who underwent therapy to help them maintain a regular daily routine and cope with stress were able to avoid relapses over a two-year period, a study has found.

    The study, published in September's Archives of General Psychiatry, examined a therapy developed by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

    Using what researchers dubbed interpersonal and social rhythm therapy, patients were taught how to keep to normal sleeping, eating and other daily routines. They also were shown how to anticipate and cope with stress just as a diabetic who would be taught, for example, how to cook and eat differently.

    "This is really a disorder characterized by massive disturbances in the body's clock and in all the things the body's clock controls," said Dr. Ellen Frank, lead author of the study. "Their clocks need to be very carefully protected and we need to do everything we can to shore up and protect that fragile clock."

    Bipolar disorder, also commonly referred to as manic depression, is a brain disorder in which sufferers experience cycles of mania, depression or mixed states. Treatment for the disorder varies by patient, but often involves some type of medication combined with therapy.

    Frank, a professor of psychiatry and psychology at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, said doctors for years have counseled bipolar sufferers about managing their lives but no one had ever systematically put that information together. She said social rhythm therapy does that, and also teaches patients to identify the triggers in their relationships with other people that can cause relapses.

    In the study, 175 patients suffering from the most severe form of bipolar disorder were divided into several groups. All the patients were given medication for the disorder, but only some received interpersonal and social rhythm therapy.

    The researchers found those who received the therapy were more likely to not have relapses of their illness during a two-year maintenance phase.

    Dr. Gail Edelsohn, an associate professor of psychiatry at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia, said sleep, especially, has a huge effect on those with mood disorders.

    "This is a very important study because what's happened is that since we have a variety of medications which are extremely useful, I think the psychosocial interventions were prematurely cast aside," Edelsohn said.

    Dr. Suzanne Vogel-Scibilia, president of the National Alliance on Mental Illness, said it's most important that bipolar sufferers have access to care, something that doesn't always happen because of the high costs of health care.


    On the Net:

    http://www.upmc.edu
     
  4. essense

    essense New Member

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    Routine does help a tremendous amount. I've always had trouble holding a routine for any extended period of time (3 more months), though. I picture myself as a gyrcscope when thinking of how bi-polar affects me. When I'm balanced, in a routine, i've got my center and I'm powerful. Unfortunatly the smallest budge, drinking mainly, but any form of self destructing behavior, can really reak havoc on all aspects of my life and knock me outta balance and crashing into things with a lot of power. Hardest part of the disorder is how out of whack my body/brain reacts to things that have a small/nominal affect on a normal brain. Very painful and difficult to see myself go through the cycle over and over.

    To be honest i've just whittled myself and personal finances down to such a state where getting back on meds and seeing somebody looks out of reach right now unless I can shore up my life for the next month and a half... (overdrawn bank account, car insurance up, oweing people money...)

    Point about how hard it is to live with a bi-polar person is taken... and I'm seriously looking at going on meds which is something I haven't considered for sometime.

    Edit: Thanks for posting that article.
     
  5. civicmon

    civicmon got all my game from the streets of california.

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    i was fine for close to a year and stopped taking meds a month ago and I feel fine.

    They say the avg bp sufferer has 8 episodes in a lifetime... so the one I went through this time last year was just one of them...
     

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