A&P Best way to take a photo of artwork?

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by dry3210, Apr 2, 2008.

  1. dry3210

    dry3210 New Member

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    I draw, just sketches and what not in a typical 8.5" x 11" book

    When I take a picture of the drawing it almost NEVER looks like it does IRL.

    I just have a regular point in shoot camera...I find the best way is to find a window with some sun coming through to take the picture

    You guys have any suggestions? I'm not looking to go out and buy a bunch of crap, but any improvements would be nice

    Thanks
     
  2. tetsuo

    tetsuo And shepherds we shall be...

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    i know you said you don't want to buy a bunch of crap, but i would invest in a decent scanner. thats going to be the easiest and cheapest route.
     
  3. dry3210

    dry3210 New Member

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    Any suggustions on one? I have one but its absolute dirt (was given to me). I do occasionally use it so an upgrade wouldn't hurt in the future.
     
  4. Trlstyle

    Trlstyle New Member

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    x2 on the scanner if they are no larger than 8.5" X 11"

    What is your budget?
     
  5. tetsuo

    tetsuo And shepherds we shall be...

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    i don't have enough experience with them to know. only one i've used much is in one of those all-in-one hp things.
     
  6. dry3210

    dry3210 New Member

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    Some are larger then 8.5"x11" but not much. 11"x14"

    I'm not looking to spend $500 but a decent one under $200?
     
  7. mojito

    mojito New Member

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    the best way is to ditch the p&s :hs:

    hang it flat in a spot you can get the camera parallel to
    use a tripod and remote
    use a macro lens, regardless of how far way it is. This is because macro lenses have a flat DOF instead of curved
    use 2 lights, one on each side. Set them up independently, so that the hot spot is in the center, then feather it to the opposite side. This ensure even lighting nd will show the depth and texture of the art the best.
     
  8. knut77

    knut77 New Member

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    When you photograph a work on paper with an automatic camera, the exposure will usually be wrong because the metering 'assumes' an average scene. A drawing will likely be something like 75% white paper/25% dark drawing. You need to try a manual exposure setting a couple stops lighter than what the auto setting gives you. In the dark ages (pre-digital) of photography we would often set exposure by metering a standard grey card, available at any camera shop. Then remove the grey card and use the same exposure to shoot anything under the same lighting conditions. It worked amazingly well. A scanner works in a similar way, always using the same exposure.
     

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