best hard drive for RAID+5?

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by HardTech, Apr 11, 2006.

  1. HardTech

    HardTech hungry

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    My media hard drive crashed, taking with it years and years of compiled files. It was a valuable collection too, but not worth the $500+ it will take to repair it.

    Anyway, I've decided I no longer want to deal with the hassle of losing everything related to my media. I'm going to build a media/file server with a lot of storage. I plan to watch movies from this hard drive, so I'd like something decently quick. This would probably be more of a network bandwidth issue.

    The hard drive that crashed was a Seagate EIDE 7200.8. I plan to stay the hell away from these drives, but I'm not opposed to getting a Seagate 7200.9. What SATA drives are most reliable?
     
  2. Mikey D

    Mikey D New Member

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    Honestly my first recommendation would be Seagate

    Drives fail it's a fact of life and you'll get conflicting answers on which drives are better. It's brand loyalty more or less.
     
  3. mdaniel

    mdaniel S is for Shiksa

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    There's no such thing as the most reliable drive. At least not that we'd know about until the entire run has been sold and statistics collected. That's the point of RAID. It assumes that a drive is going to die and is desiged to survive it. If your data is really that important, don't rely on RAID either. Although it can protect you against physical disk failure, it won't do a thing about viruses, accidental deletion, file system corruption, etc. The easiest solution would be to get three drives: Mirror two of them internally and connect the 3rd through a Firewire or USB2.0 box and back up to that periodically.
     
  4. crontab

    crontab (uid = 0)

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    An "investment" or a focus for a reliable raid controller would be more worthwhile. The point of RAID is for the simple fact of the unreliablity of hard drives. Theoretically, if you have the most reliable hard drive, why would you need a RAID setup?

    With that being said, I have no recommendation, since don't follow the pc market anymore. I'm sure some home pc geek will able to fill in this void.
     
  5. borborygmus

    borborygmus Guest

    I just bought a pair of 250gb SATA 7200.8s :noes:
     
  6. MrMan

    MrMan New Member

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    Well, one suggestion is to not buy hard drives from the same lot, since there is a chance that these drives may fail close to the same time.
     
  7. HardTech

    HardTech hungry

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    wouldn't RAID help protect against file system corruption?

    anyway, this box will just sit on the network until I get my own house, where I'll set up a layered firewall and have this box only accessible by computers in the house. Viruses and accidental deletion are probably at the least of my concerns
     
  8. Harry Caray

    Harry Caray Fine purveyor of x.264, h.264 & TS HD-Video !!! HD

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    I'll 2nd. Seagate drives...

    EMC, StorageTek, and NetApp use them in their big SAN's....

    I've used them for years in all my personal and clients PC's without a hitch. (5year warr. too!)

    Friends, fam, etc I know use WD, Maxtor and they all have died. The Seagates just seem to run.. :dunno:

    but the 5 year warr sounds good huh?;)
     
  9. crontab

    crontab (uid = 0)

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    Absolutely not. File systems can become corrupt due to a power outage or a hard crash of your pc, etc. The volume that's on your raid5 set should be fine, but when you boot back up, some files may have been corrupted if it was being written to at the time and the file system didn't have a chance to completely write it or buffering it out, etc.

    A network share doesn't guaruntee virus protection. An offline backup of your critical stuff would be safest. But if this is a media server like you say, movies, music, etc. I don't think anyone would care if that goes away...
     
  10. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    RAID only protects against hardware failure. The RAID controller knows nothing about what the data format is supposed to be, so it can't (and doesn't try to) stop the computer from putting garbage on the disk if that what it wants to do.

    All RAID does is make sure the data on the disks at any given time still looks like it did when the data was first put there, and it fixes it it the data (or bugs you to install a replacement disk) if the data is corrupted.
     

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