Being Prepared...the ultimate thread.

Discussion in 'OT Driven' started by Boudreaux, Aug 3, 2005.

  1. Boudreaux

    Boudreaux Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2002
    Messages:
    63,081
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    DFW, Texas
    I've been wanting to make this thread for a while now. It sounded like a good idea in my head, but its 3 am here, so it is intirely likely that it will not come out as good as I was planning.

    I have been riding off and on for 7 years now (mostly off) and have ridden everything from an old honda 125, suzuki 250 enduro, bmw '03 kt1200R, to an '03 R6. Most of the time my buddy lets me diddy around on his r6, but I have yet to save up enough money for a bike that will be mine to keep. I have been saving hardcore for about 1.5 years now, accrued a little under 2500, so i got a ways to go. But this has been with having only ~40 bucks a week in extra spending money to divide between activites and the bike, tough times.

    I have my heart set on an f4i, 01-03. It was the first bike i ever wanted when i promised myself to have one by the time i turned 21 (which isnt going to happen BTW).

    Anyway, enough chit chat, to the point, shall we?

    I have been reading and re-reading my Texas DOT motorcycle handbook over the years, and have memorized damn near everything in the book, it has been virtually my bible. I have even taken the MSF online quiz and motorcycle situation training "games", all in efforts to be the best and smartest rider I can be.

    But, alas, as we all know, you can never be too prepared, I am waiting to take the MSF course until I have well over enough money to buy my f4i and plenty of proper gear just so i don't have a lot of down time in between the course and lots of riding.

    So, I come to you, my well ridden comrades and ask you to tell me, and talk to me and others about things they don't teach you in the book, and don't teach you at MSF, and things that would possibly be counter-intuitive to a "new" rider.

    Things like what to do when someone stops in front of you during a sharp turn, obstacle avoidance in the same situation, to emergency breaking, from A to Z, all there it to know.

    I know that the goal is to have no situation be a panick or be unprepared for, so thats what this thread is for. Lets here it guys. :bigthumb:
     
  2. mk3

    mk3 77 PPTA

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2004
    Messages:
    13,153
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    BXNYC
    grab front brake and grab clutch lever
     
  3. Boudreaux

    Boudreaux Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2002
    Messages:
    63,081
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    DFW, Texas
    ...holy vague batman!...
     
  4. Peter Gibbons

    Peter Gibbons OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2003
    Messages:
    7,865
    Likes Received:
    9
    Take the MSF, they cover all the shit you'd make up on your own. Seriously.
     
  5. fknfast

    fknfast Coming to a QB near you

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2004
    Messages:
    7,034
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Kennesaw, GA
    The MSF is really a great course. They teach you exactly what your asking, how to be prepared. My best piece of advice is dont grab to much throttle unless you know its safe to do so. People are unpredictable so dont "think" that, that person wouldnt back out into the street cause before you know it you will be on your ass. Always be ready to react, going around corners and intersections for example. Always assume there will be something there around that corner.
     
  6. Clingman

    Clingman Clingman runs Bartertown.

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2004
    Messages:
    2,731
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Thunderdome
    Ride dirtbikes at least a little. You will learn how to control the bike when one or both wheels are locked up. This is a skill that you won't ever touch during your course of daily riding until you get into deep shit and need to use it.
     
  7. Tom93R1

    Tom93R1 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2004
    Messages:
    411
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Tempe, AZ
    Things like that are why you dont ride at your limits on the streets, keep that for the track. If you keep it to 85% of your limits on the streets then you have that 15% room to react and go wide or come in tighter to avoid the obstacle.
     
  8. Jerm

    Jerm I

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Messages:
    61,188
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    West Coast, sporting Dodger Blue
  9. Alt+F4

    Alt+F4 official OT hockey stud

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2001
    Messages:
    3,790
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Manchester, NH
    Always expect to be cut off, merged into, rear-ended, sideswiped, etc. Always expect that someone will run a red light, a stop sign, and a red turn arrow. Ride like you're invisible, because to some fuckheads, you are. Don't trust anyone else to "do the right thing" on the road - often times they do the wrong thing and you need to be in a position to protect yourself. Keep it in first gear at stoplights until someone stops behind you. Always use both brakes. Riding on the highway can be a more fun and economical way of getting to work, but resist the urge to speed too much as it can be expensive. Check your mirrors often, and always leave yourself an "out". Don't feel bad when people squint when your headlight is in their mirrors - that means they see you. Ride your own ride when in a group - if you have to try hard to keep up, you're going too fast. Do a track day. Wear your gear, even when it's hot out. Buy riding boots. Keep your chain clean, and join a webforum of local riders, but only if they're not squids. Always wave to other riders - even cruisers. Always remember that you alone represent the image of the sportbiker when you ride - if you ride to endanger yourself and others, that image might be stereotyped onto the rest of us. Your safety is your responsibility.

    The ride is the reason. The destination is the excuse.
     
  10. machine81

    machine81 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2004
    Messages:
    903
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Edmonds, WA

    Very well put
     
  11. Jerm

    Jerm I

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Messages:
    61,188
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    West Coast, sporting Dodger Blue
    BTW, the majority of motorcycle accidents aren't caused by cagers, most are by going to fast into a corner and swinging wide. Only like 7% are by some cage making a left hand turn in front of you.
     
  12. Ivy Mike

    Ivy Mike New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2002
    Messages:
    119,226
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Las Vegas, NV
    Locking them up on the street or in the dirt is completely different. If you have to lock them up on the street, you are stepping to hard on the back brake and didn't plan on what was in front of you.

    Street and dirt are completely different animals. Dirt will teach you a little about control and how to use the controls, but the dynamics of both are different.
     
  13. Tom93R1

    Tom93R1 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2004
    Messages:
    411
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Tempe, AZ
    One more thing to add, when on the freeway in town I stick to the left most lane and keep my speed just above the flow of traffic. This way I only have to worry about idiots on one side of me and if I am overtaking most people I dont have so much to worry about sneaking up behind. I dont worry much about getting a ticket, I figure the few bucks it may cost me if I get pulled over is worth it for my safety. I have yet to be pulled over for doing that, and when I do I will explain it to the officer. Maybe it will get me out of it maybe not, same goes for the judge and DA.
     
  14. Boudreaux

    Boudreaux Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2002
    Messages:
    63,081
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    DFW, Texas
    very well put good sir, i thank you for all your information...

    in light of stickyfingaz thread about his accident, i found it hard to talk myself into getting a bike, but then, i go over to a local forum, and the blood starts surging through me again :sad2:
     
  15. luvmylegend

    luvmylegend Wut?

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2001
    Messages:
    16,706
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Somewhere near Charlotte
    Here's my input.

    When coming over the crest of a hill where you can't see over, slow down and prepare to stop. I lost a friend about 10 years ago to an accident like this. He crested a hill while accellerating and a truck had pulled out of his driveway and he slammed his bike into the side of the truck bed. He died instantly. I ALWAYS slow down before I hit the top of the hill.

    When you're in a scary situation where a crash could happen, DO NOT FOCUS ON WHAT YOU'RE TRYING TO AVOID. It's called target fixation and it's so hard to overcome. It actually happened to me on Wednesday night while entering the highway. It hasn't happened for a long time, but it scared the shit out of me.
     
  16. Boudreaux

    Boudreaux Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2002
    Messages:
    63,081
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    DFW, Texas
    Im assuming this is like where you are traveling behind a truck, and a crate falls out and you focus on teh crate...you want to avoid doing that, correct?

    Any tips on helping avoid target fixation?
     
  17. luvmylegend

    luvmylegend Wut?

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2001
    Messages:
    16,706
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Somewhere near Charlotte
    You MUST look where you want to go. What happened to me the other night is I was getting onto the highway, which has some construction, and it was down to one lane. I was trying to beat out an 18 wheeler so I didn't get stuck behind him, and there were cones lined up on my right side. I came close to the cones and I looked at them, which made me go even closer. I was less than 6 inches away from the cones, when I made myself look to my left (where I wanted to go) and sure enough, I made it out OK. I haven't done it for a long time (probably 5-6 years), but one time is enough to kill you.

    This is a perfect example of target fixation: http://www.uponone.com/videos.php?id=171

    also, a perfect example of what NOT to do on a bike: http://www.uponone.com/videos.php?id=1862
     
  18. Clingman

    Clingman Clingman runs Bartertown.

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2004
    Messages:
    2,731
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Thunderdome
    Not the same, not completely different. Encountering a locked wheel for the first time while trying to miss a car is not a good thing.

    Shit happens.
     
  19. luvmylegend

    luvmylegend Wut?

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2001
    Messages:
    16,706
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Somewhere near Charlotte
    Everyone should at the minimum spend at least 4 hours riding around a big empty parking lot. You should practice slow turns, backing up, hard stops with both the front brake, the rear brake, and a mix of both.

    I always use a mix of both. I first apply the rear brake to slow it, then apply the front brake while staying on the rear.
     
  20. Alt+F4

    Alt+F4 official OT hockey stud

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2001
    Messages:
    3,790
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Manchester, NH
    I disagree with you. You shouldn't put yourself in a position to have to slam on the brakes hard (it's called defensive riding), and even when faced with an emergency situation, you should have practiced enough that you can come to a controlled, immediate stop without locking up the brakes. No street rider should HAVE to learn how to ride a locked wheel.
     
  21. Clingman

    Clingman Clingman runs Bartertown.

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2004
    Messages:
    2,731
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Thunderdome
    You don't have to tell me what defensive riding is.

    Well that's great, but here on earth, riders die every day because cars pull out in front of them, not leaving enough space for the motorcycle to stop, controlled or uncontrolled. I know guys who saved their own skin by steering with the rear end, and I've witnessed an accident where the bike's locked up tire left a black mark straight as an arrow into the door of a car. Rider and passenger were dead on the concrete.

    Not to mention all the sand that's on the roads around here for 6 months following the one puny snowstorm we get every year. Hit a little tiny bit of that and tell me it's not important to know how to ride a sliding bike :o
     
  22. Boudreaux

    Boudreaux Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2002
    Messages:
    63,081
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    DFW, Texas
    wow, 4 hours, thats some advice you never hear!
     
  23. s2k

    s2k OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2002
    Messages:
    46,932
    Likes Received:
    18
    Location:
    corn field, iowa
    taking the MSF course is probably one of the best thing i've done to prepare for street riding, i can tell you that much (only been riding for about 2 weeks)

    they prepare you well for both knowledge and skill....i find myself using the knowledge i learned in that class a lot when i ride....

    its also hell of a lot easier (and safer) to learn on a small bike, like the honda/suzuki 250 they use in the course, than starting with a, lets say, 600 cc bike...i'm sure youve have experience riding your friend's 600 but i started out not having any experience at all

    after the class i bought a ninja zzr600 right away and started riding that, i'm used to the bike now, but i know if i hadnt learned on the 250, id have a hard time with the 600
     
  24. Alt+F4

    Alt+F4 official OT hockey stud

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2001
    Messages:
    3,790
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Manchester, NH
    Exactly proving my point - locking the brakes means you don't stop fast enough, and you might die. Imagine if they used both brakes just at the threshold of lockout, they might have stopped completely or at least reduced the impact speed.

    I agree that having as much skill as possible can't hurt, and dirtbike riding is beneficial, but I see no reason to have to "learn" riding out a skid. At least I would never tell a newbie he would have to learn that.
     
  25. Clingman

    Clingman Clingman runs Bartertown.

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2004
    Messages:
    2,731
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Thunderdome
    Not quite. You should know that at the limit of braking on a bike, the rear end is doing only a tiny amount of the work. For this guy, who had maybe 30 feet to stop from 45mph, having the rear locked or unlocked while going straight didn't matter. Had he gone behind the car by steering with the rear end, he could have had a chance.

    Sooner or later, everyone slides at least a little and either makes it or eats pavement. There is too much gravel, sand, dust, dirt, loose asphalt, etc. out there to think that it's possible to ride without ever losing traction.
     

Share This Page