GUN "bedding" the action?

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by jehan60188, Jan 12, 2009.

  1. jehan60188

    jehan60188 New Member

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    http://www.handloadersbench.com/forum34/3527.html

    Looking to get a .22lr for plinking, and you can't go wrong with remington, right?
    just in case I need to do this (not that I'm very accurate at this point in my fledgling shooting career), what is it?

    also, can anyone recommend for/against this vs a marlin 925?
    thanks!
     
  2. bigman7903

    bigman7903 OT Supporter

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    I'm going to go ahead and recommend a Ruger 10/22 for semi-auto as far as .22's, it's very customizable and easy to find pieces for

    for a bolt .22, check out Savage or CZ, those are probably the better entry level .22's available
     
  3. If you're just looking to plink with a .22, you really don't have any reason to bed the action.
     
  4. phrozenlikwid

    phrozenlikwid New Member

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    Yes and no. Plinking means different things to different people. I suppose your accuracy requirements and how you current setup places in regards to meeting them will determine whether or not you want to bed it.

    Myself, I try to minimize movement between the action and stock proper in nearly every rifle I own. I've bedded enough stuff that its no biggie, and I like taking that problem out of the equation.

    Some rifle/stock combos are better than others. If you notice some verticle stringing or strange fliers, grab some devcon steelbed and go to town.
     
  5. jehan60188

    jehan60188 New Member

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    I want a 22 since it'll be cheaper to shoot (don't mind paying extra for the actual gun, if that means it'll last 10+ years. but i want to shoot 22lr to save money)
    I want to be able to put a bipod on it, so i can shoot prone, sitting, whatever
    i want to shoot at the range, mostly, so i don't need anything too rugged (no real harsh conditions at the range)
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2009
  6. oakback

    oakback New Member

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    What exactly is "bedding" in this context?
     
  7. eric5678

    eric5678 striving for mediocrity OT Supporter

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  8. phrozenlikwid

    phrozenlikwid New Member

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    Maybe I'm missing something, but I really don't see where bedding has to do with any of the above.

    Bedding is a way to minimalize movement between the action, and the stock. Remember that accuracy is nothing more than repeatability; bedding controls the relationship between the stock and action, and the pressure(s) associated, nothing more.

    To do it yourself is cheap, to get someone else to do it ranges from $50-150. I don't really see how it will aid in "durability".

    Do you understand what bedding is, and what role it plays in making an accurate rifle?
     
  9. jehan60188

    jehan60188 New Member

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    no, that's why i asked about it
     
  10. phrozenlikwid

    phrozenlikwid New Member

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    It wasn't a slam. I was confused by your last post, hence the question.

    "bedding" generally just refers to using epoxy or similar to fill in the voids between the stock and the action. This distributes pressure equally (or provides pressure to certain areas if you want), can free float the barrel/action (no touching), and generally provides a nice stable "bed" for the action to rest in.

    When an action does not fit the stock very well, it can be prone to shifting during recoil, various atmospheric conditions, hold, trigger pull, etc. This disturbing and changing of the various pressures and placement of the action in the stock will fuck with the inherent (and practical) accuracy of the rifle.
     
  11. jehan60188

    jehan60188 New Member

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    ah, thanks!
     

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