Article on oly lifts and complexes....

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by timberwolf, Jan 22, 2007.

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  1. timberwolf

    timberwolf New Member

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    It is commonly known that using variations of the two competitive weightlifting movements (snatch and clean & jerk) can have many positive effects on athlete performance. The variations used by the Bulls include:
    • power snatch
    • power clean
    • snatch and clean high pulls
    • push press
    • push (power) jerk





    The pulling movements are executed from various starting positions, including the floor.Our training of the Chicago Bulls and other pro, college, and high school
    athletes emphasizes these lifts as powerful tools for athletic development.
    In teaching these movements we particularly focus on safe execution
    and maximum sport benefit. Weightlifting variations are neither
    difficult nor dangerous to perform; however, since these are complex
    movements that involve high velocity, the athlete must be well prepared prior
    to applying a serious load. It is the responsibility of strength and conditioning
    coaches to ensure a proper level of preparation before increasing
    the weight. Much of the literature from the former Soviet Union confirms the use of general preparation exercises for young athletes, yet we cannot expect the Bulls to have previously been exposed to proper exercise technique. We utilize light weights or even a dowel to ensure proper technique is learned. After basic proficiency is
    achieved, loads are gradually increased to a more challenging intensity.

    We look for the presence of three precursors necessary before serious trainingwith weightlifting variations is applied. These criteria are mobility, stability, and basic strength. Until these are met athletes will not be able to perform the lifts efficiently and safely. Demonstration of these three criteria allows for safe and speedy progress.


    Mobility

    Mobility can be defined as the ability of a joint to move freely and without pain throughout its range of motion. Poor mobility may be a result of genetics, injury, and poor flexibility in the surrounding joint musculature. Good hip mobility is necessary toproperly perform any competitive weightlifting movement or its variation.


    We look for a player’s ability to exhibit a nice deep, flatfooted squat
    with a straight back as evidence of this mobility. Similarly, an athlete’s ability to achieve a good neutral spine position is of utmost importance. Without this
    an athlete will be unable to get into a good starting position for these exercises, except perhaps a power snatch or power clean from a high mid-thigh position. We have worked with athletes with so little hip mobility that
    they have a tough time maintaining a neutral spine, even with the bar at a
    mid-thigh position. Another critical area is the thoracic spine. An athlete must be able to display good, healthy extension through this region in order to achieve and
    maintain the safe neutral back needed for weightlifting movements. If the
    thoracic spine lacks extension and stability, a player’s posture may collapse
    when loaded in the hang position, which negatively effects barbell trajectory.
    Related to thoracic extension is shoulder mobility, necessary when the barbell
    is held overhead in a snatch or jerk position. Mobility in the wrists and elbows is critical so an athlete can safely and properly receive the bar at the top of a snatch or a clean.


    Stability



    Stability has certainly been a recent “buzz-word” in the strength and conditioning /personal training professions. We feel some trainers have


    over-emphasized the concept and this has become the primary focus of
    training. It is not uncommon, especially in the personal training field, to
    see an entire training program composed of specific, small muscle stability
    exercises. We agree basic stability is crucial not only to lifting performance,
    but also sport execution. However, in training the Bulls we emphasize once basic stability is demonstrated, an athlete needs to get on with more advanced and useful aspects of training. Most healthy young athletes can safely develop stability while the exercises are being learned. It is important to note, however, that any athlete with a pre-existing condition (especially in the back) must spend more time correcting this weakness before progressing. A coach must look for the ability to maintain postural stability under load. Most important in preparation for performing weightlifting variations is stabilityin the trunk, upper back, and shoulders. A great deal of information is available on trunk, or core stability, so I
    will not cover the topic in detail here.An athlete must have pre-requisite
    core stability to maintain spinal alignment during the high velocity spinal
    extension in the pull phases of snatch and clean variations. This is crucial
    because the spine must transfer force during extension. If one segment is
    unstable relative to another, the integrity of the whole unit will be
    compromised. Similarly, the athlete must be able to safely absorb the load
    when "catching" a snatch or clean, or pushing a bar overhead. Likewise, stability is needed in the shoulder and scapulae areas. Failure
    to exhibit adequate stability here may very well lead to pain and/or injury as
    loads are increased, particularly in any snatch variation.


    Basic Strength
    Prior to introducing loads in weightlifting movements a player must demonstrate adequate levels of basic strength. With the Bulls we look at a couple of different movements. We like to use Steve Javorek's (Johnson Country CommunityCollege, Overland Park, KS) barbell complex. We seek three sets of the complex with 40% of body weight before introducing serious loads for weightlifting variations. To clarify, the complex consists of:
    • High-pull
    • Muscle snatch
    • Good morning
    • Squat to press
    • Bent-over row


    Each movement is performed for 6 reps, moving continuously to the nextexercise. Other lifts we check for proficiency include the so-called Romanian dead lift (a flat back, slightly bent knee, stiff-legged deadlift), and the squat. A good level of basic strength in these movements allows our players to hold positions under high velocities, which leads to better technical proficiency. Once the proper levels of stability, mobility, and basic strength are achieved, we find it much easier to progress technically and achieve [FONT=Times New Roman][SIZE=3]long-term increases in intensity. We teach the actual pulling movements in reverse order, from the top down. The bar is only positioned as low as the athlete can technically and mechanically handle. Due to the average individual height of the Bulls, very few players actually perform the power snatch or the power clean from the
    floor. However, many have progressed to a starting position just below the knees. It is important to reiterate that we are big proponents of using variations of the snatch and clean and jerk in our training programs We feel these are one of the most important tools in an athlete’s training. Because of this, we also feel it is extremely important to confirm a player has a good base of physical preparation, exhibited through stability, mobility, and basic
    strength. This will ensure that the athlete can perform the movements safely
    and efficiently.[/SIZE][/FONT]




     
  2. Searcher

    Searcher New Member

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    Good read......

    Ninja Edit.....I tried an oly program for a few months till I hurt myself......Amazing how easy it is to do something wrong when you add minimal weight and you are off just the slightest bit.....
     
  3. siniquezu

    siniquezu New Member

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    Out of curiousity, where did this article come from?
     
  4. timberwolf

    timberwolf New Member

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    Magazine called Strength and Health in pdf format....from 2002
     
  5. C4

    C4 OT OG Aussie #1

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    :cool:

    "Weightlifting variations are neither difficult nor dangerous to perform; however, since these are complex movements that involve high velocity, the athlete must be well prepared prior to applying a serious load. It is the responsibility of strength and conditioning coaches to ensure a proper level of preparation before increasing the weight."

    There are many people i wish would read this.. relatives, friends, etc that feel it is their duty to inform me every god damn day that 'its dangerous!@#!@#' (Whilst sucking down a cigarette or other such stupid activities)
     
  6. timberwolf

    timberwolf New Member

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    A couple days ago I was working on full cleans (usually only do power ones) and I actually scrapped my adam's apple. Looked like a hicky. :o
     
  7. C4

    C4 OT OG Aussie #1

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    one of the guys yesterday was doing a jerk and the bar cracked his chin :rofl: almost knocked himself out :rofl:
     
  8. DatacomGuy

    DatacomGuy is moving to Canada

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    :rofl:

    I've not tried any of the oly lifts yet.
     
  9. ACLdestroyer

    ACLdestroyer OT Supporter

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    All the Olys Ive tried have worked their way into my mix. IS there a site with illustrations of all of them?
     
  10. GOGZILLA

    GOGZILLA Double-Uranium Member

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    theres really no point in doing them if you dont have someone knowledgeable there to coach you through it until youve got a pretty good grasp on it. theyre fairly technical and dont offer much benefit over regular less technical stuff you could do instead (squat variations, deadlift variations, overhead presses variations). id say its a way better idea to do those components of them than the entire lift for the average gym goer
     
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