Are there any modern classics?

Discussion in 'Entertainment' started by backslide, Feb 17, 2004.

  1. backslide

    backslide This space for rent. Inquire inside.

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    Say, on the level of Fahrenheit 451, Brave New World or 1984?

    I'm sure there are plenty of books out now that are social commentaries wrapped in science fiction, but does anyone know of any books that might be bound for greatness - books that will be required reading for kids in school in the future.
     
  2. Joe_Cool

    Joe_Cool Never trust a woman or a government. Moderator

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    I guess it depends on the cutoff point for a book to be considered modern. Science Fiction is a pretty new genre, after all, so what we'd consider a "classic" (example: The Time Machine by H.G. Wells) is so new that any snooty Lit student worth his beret would snort and call you a peasant for reading it.

    Most of Asimov's best work was in the 50s. Most of the great SF writers were alive and writing within the last decade or two.
     
  3. smell my finger

    smell my finger strive nonetheless towards beauty and truth,

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    i was going to say asimov as well.. I Robot and the Foundation series are definitally all time greats.

    it's tough to say who will be remebered 50 years from now. but i would bet Lary Niven's Ringworld will.
     
  4. WERUreo

    WERUreo Imua!

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    I agree, Asimov's work is definitely going to be remembered. I thought for sure that Joe_Cool would have said Heinlein, at least for the social commentary...

    I would also be inclined to include Arthur C. Clarke in this list of modern classics...
     
  5. Joe_Cool

    Joe_Cool Never trust a woman or a government. Moderator

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    Heinlein is definitely what I'd call classic, but I'm actually more interested in figuring out how to separate "modern classic" vs "classic" in sci-fi, since it's so damn young. :)

    Like I said, even the oldest sci fi is barely 100 years old!
     
  6. Joe_Cool

    Joe_Cool Never trust a woman or a government. Moderator

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    I guess for really modern, I'd have to say William Gibson's Neuromancer. That was 1984, and it started up a whole subgenre (Cyberpunk). He's a good author, even if his screenplays aren't widely acclaimed.

    [If you guys can keep a secret, I actually liked Johnny Mnemonic - both the short story and the movie :o ]
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2004
  7. smell my finger

    smell my finger strive nonetheless towards beauty and truth,

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    Stranger in a Strange Land.. definately :cool:
     
  8. Joe_Cool

    Joe_Cool Never trust a woman or a government. Moderator

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    ACK :barf:

    Have I mentioned that I hate that book?
     
  9. Pro Street

    Pro Street New Member

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    Hyperion.

    there are references to it everywhere in more modern literature and movies, even thought the series is still relatively young.
     
  10. Pro Street

    Pro Street New Member

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  11. anjego

    anjego Invading your economy!

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    hyperion, definitley.

    i'd also humbly suggest Snow Crash, Cryptonomicon, and Ender's Game
     
  12. Acesn8s

    Acesn8s The Deadman's Hand

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    I agree, Gibson tackles some interresting theories with his Cyberpunk novels.

    I actually liked Johnny Mnemonic too, simply because it was based off of Gibson's work. It's amazing that they developed that movie from a short story. A very small short story at that.
     
  13. Recolas

    Recolas Bring me back to fallen town Where someone is stil

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    hmm... modern classic, im gonna have to go with enders game by orson scott card
     
  14. Joe_Cool

    Joe_Cool Never trust a woman or a government. Moderator

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    The thing I thought was interesting about Johnny Mnemonic after reading the short story is that the girl in the movie (Jane, played by a very hot Dina Meyer :naughty: ) was originally Molly, the same assassin in Neuromancer (Case's bodyguard).

    I wish Gibson had kept the screenplay closer to the short story, so that someday when they make a Neuromancer film, it would be obvious that they're part of the same continuity. :dunno:

    And yeah, the Ender series is AWESOME. I'd definitely call them modern classics. :bigthumb:
     
  15. baboymo

    baboymo Have you been circumcised?

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    Who? Who's seen I, Robot?
     
  16. WERUreo

    WERUreo Imua!

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    I've seen it. I actually liked it. I don't remember the book very well, it's been so long since I read it. But, standing on its own, the movie was, IMO, one of the best this summer.
     
  17. zxvasdf

    zxvasdf New Member

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    not surprising it d be orson scott card' s 'ender s game' (topics: military lifestyle, and the prudence of heaping stress onto a soldier) and his next book 'the speaker of the dead' (social commentary, how two cultures interact. i particularly liked card s descriptions of varelese and raman to describe 'aliens') and because it appeals to children and adults, and it is a relatively clean read.

    i would so love to see heinlein's 'time enough for love' become required reading for high school or college level students. when a dude goes back in time to pork his mum while his daddy was out working and his younger self was in the next room, thats bound to be a controversional discussion topic.
     
  18. Acesn8s

    Acesn8s The Deadman's Hand

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    I second anjego's suggestion of Neal Stephenson's Snow Crash.

    I think as time goes by and the interweb evolves, more and more "cyberpunk" novels might jump to classics. These are novels that predict or maybe even shape what the internet might end up becoming.

    Oh, what about Herbert's Dune? I definately think Dune is a classic.
     
  19. zxvasdf

    zxvasdf New Member

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    the dark tower by stephen king, starting with 'the gunslinger'
     
  20. Joe_Cool

    Joe_Cool Never trust a woman or a government. Moderator

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    Dune is definitely a classic. And I agree on the Dark Tower series too.
     
  21. zxvasdf

    zxvasdf New Member

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    dan simmons' hyperion books, and his new ilium/olympos novels. those are a must read if you are a hard sf fan
     
  22. zxvasdf

    zxvasdf New Member

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    childhood's end by arthur c clarke. mindblowing.
    the stars my destination by alfred bester
     
  23. sjambler

    sjambler New Member

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    The City and the Stars by Arthur C. Clarke
    The World Inside and Downward to the Earth by Robert Silverberg
    A Maze of Death and Ubik by Philip K. Dick
    The Forge of God by Greg Bear
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2005
  24. zxvasdf

    zxvasdf New Member

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    i ve just discovered theodore sturgeon, and he has to be one of the greatest writers alive.

    godbody theodore sturgeon
    more than human theodore sturgeon
    brainwave by poul anderson
     
  25. JonDaAzn

    JonDaAzn New Member

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    Microserfs also seems to be a very influential novel, although i haven't read it. The Martian Chronicles is another good Bradbury book
     

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