Are there any items of hard ware *Wireless info*

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by rumperpumper, Jun 14, 2006.

  1. rumperpumper

    rumperpumper New Member

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    That would enable me to to connect to my network using my laptop whilst in the shed? Im just out of range from my home wireless but would really like to see if there is any thing that could act as a medium to make this so...

    Cheers:bigthumb:
     
  2. mdaniel

    mdaniel S is for Shiksa

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    Assuming your wireless access point is inside the house and not already close to the shed, you could add a repeater to get the wifi as close to the shed as possible. There's also directional antennas you can buy for most access points.

    Does the house's electricity extend out there? If so, you could use a pair of ethernet to powerline bridges. I actually did that today for someone with a detached garage couldn't get wifi from the house.
     
  3. o2

    o2 Witty Title Here OT Supporter

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    Get a repeater, or a larger antenna for the router itself.
     
  4. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Another solution would be to run a piece of plastic pipe under your yard out to the shed and push a long ethernet cable through it. I guarantee it'll be cheaper than buying heavy-duty wireless equipment, and more reliable too.
     
  5. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    not really. the cost of PVC, sealant, and Cat5e would easily approach $100. A repeater can be had for less.
     
  6. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Depends how far away the guy's shed is. It has to be pretty far away if his home wireless doesn't reach out there, and whereas the cost of a hardwire increases linearly with respect to distance, the cost of wireless (due to increased power demands) increases as the square of the distance. And either way, a hardwire would still be more reliable, and faster to boot.
     
  7. Doc Brown

    Doc Brown Don't make me make you my hobby

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    I'm not a network guy by any stretch, but PVC pipe, sealant and cat5 is
    pretty cheap stuff.
    :hsughno:
     
  8. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    You guys are forgetting something that my CCNA cert is telling me... Do not EVER run Cat5 (copper cable) between two buildings. The potential (pun intended) for voltage differential between each end can be VERY dangerous.

    Wireless and Fibre are among the only safe options.

    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  9. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    You have to use special Cat5 that is encased in jelly and shit to avoid this problem, yeah?
     
  10. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    no. There is no way to avoid this with copper cable. The voltage differential is introduced at one end, and it's effects are felt at the other. This is the inherent problem with conductivity.

    The only solution is non-conductive cabling, which is primarily fibre. Wireless also solves this problem at a lesser cost than traditional fibre.
     
  11. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    Well, they make special Cat5 for this purpose though, yeah? I only mention it because I learned this when we had to route data through a backup cable that had literally been set on top of some gravel between two casino buildings. Suffice it to say, most data was lost after six months of people driving and walking over the cable. And at the time, dude told us about the ground Cat5.
     
  12. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

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    So am I the only person...

    1. wondering if he even HAS power in his shed
    2. noticed we are talking about a LAPTOP
    3. wondering what his shed is sheathed in (and if that might cause issue with the wireless)
     
  13. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    *NO*


    How many f*ing times do I have do say it? If it's conductive, it will NOT work.
     
  14. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    Last edited: Jun 15, 2006
  15. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    that URL is filled with people saying its a BAD idea. Two that I found especially to-the-point:

     
  16. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    Absolutely. There is also a gem about how to do it safely, if for some reason you insist on doing it.
     
  17. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    yes, which mentions expensive equipment that acts as an industrial-strength "surge" protection circuit. Basically your wire gets fried and you must re-lay cable, but your computer stays okay. Not worth the trouble -- or cost.

    (Fibre || WiFi) > Conductive_Cable
     
  18. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    Absolutely.
     
  19. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    The article assumes that the buildings are large enough to have separate power supplies. This is not likely, considering one of the two buildings in this case is a shed.

    Ground voltage differential is only a problem if the shed is powered off a separate circuit. It's very likely that the shed is powered off one of the house's circuits, and the simple way to fix that is to connect the router to the same circuit that the shed is on. On the off chance that the shed is powered by the house, yet has its own separate ground, the way to fix that is to run a simple wire through the same ditch that the Cat5's pipe runs through (but not inside the pipe), and solder one end of the wire to the house's ground and the other end to the shed's ground. That way any voltage differential would be equalized much, much faster than even rain-soaked dirt could accomplish, and any voltage differential would be far too low to begin with to create enough EMF to interfere with the Cat5's data stream.

    This all assumes the shed even HAS power to begin with.
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2006
  20. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    It's not an article, it's a text book.

    In order for the shed to HAVE power, it would have to meet building code. And building code says that each building, even if sharing MAINS power, *must* have it's own ground. Detached garages, for example, although they have power run from the house, will have their own ground.

    It is this differential of potential between grounds that is such a safety hazard.
     
  21. Doc Brown

    Doc Brown Don't make me make you my hobby

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    Man you would think that people never heard of a surge protector.

    BTW, the lightning strike part almost made me laugh.
    A direct hit with lighting is going to take out your gear no matter
    what it's plugged into.
     
  22. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    incorrect. It has been demonstrated that an energized underground cable can attract lightning strikes. Anything connected to this circuit will get fried.

    if lightning were to strike the ground in a similar location, but without a cable, computers in nearby homes would likely be fine.
     
  23. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    I agree that ground voltage differentials are a problem. I described how to neutralize the problem without use of a special Cat5 cable.
     
  24. Doc Brown

    Doc Brown Don't make me make you my hobby

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    What part of direct hit didn't you get?
    I didn't say anything about nearby homes.
    I said direct hit.
    The guy is wanting to run a wire into his shed.
    If he gets a direct hit, it's all toast no matter what.
    If it's only nearby, he's fine with a surge protector.
    Period.
     
  25. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Actually the guy wanted wireless. I suggested the wired connection as an alternative.
     

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