A&P Aquarium Photography

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by anjego, Aug 11, 2004.

  1. anjego

    anjego Invading your economy!

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    is so fawking hard.

    and i mean, commercial aquariums, not small, personal tanks. like the big tanks, with sharks & stuff.

    poor lighting, reflective glass, etc.

    does anybody have suggestions as to how to take better photos at aquariums?
     
  2. Pottzor

    Pottzor Open your eyes and you will see

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    No idea what camera you are using so its a bit tough, but the flash has to go at an angle, whether you bounce it or just compose at an angle through the glass.
     
  3. anjego

    anjego Invading your economy!

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    using a canon A80... no external flash.
     
  4. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    Step one. Turn off all exterior lighting as much as practical.

    Step two. Position camera so that lens is flush against glass to cut down on reflections.

    Step three. Mount external flash or other external light so that light is directed down into the tank from above. Do not try and shoot with flash on camera or next to camera. Lighting will be flat and reflections may obscure fish. Using florescence light is usually preferred because it is soft and even. You will have to color correct for the light in photoshop or by using a florescence filter on your camera.
     
  5. BLKDVLGSX

    BLKDVLGSX OT Supporter

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    you looking to get something like this?
    [​IMG]
    this was a HUGE tank
     
  6. anjego

    anjego Invading your economy!

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    that's great advice, but it doesn't help much for shooting in a large-scale commercial aquarium (ie, the Shedd Aquarium in Chicago, or the Tennesee Aquarium in Chattanooga).

    BLKDVLGSX: yes, something like that. let me grab my photos and show what i meant by being unhappy with how they turned out
     
  7. anjego

    anjego Invading your economy!

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    this is actually the one that turned out best.. but notice the ghosting on the left fish cuz it was moving during the exposure

    [​IMG]

    but then see this one. that's me standing in the tank :uh:

    [​IMG]

    but then, this one, with the flash, and at an angle, the fish don't look natural at all

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    The principal is the same. Use the exsisting light, keep your lens as close to the tank as possible and use fast film. If you have a seperate flash, you can place it higher than the lens point it down and diffuse the light by bouncing it off a white card or placing a white cloth (hankerchief) over the flash head. The key is to not have any reflections from the glass and keep your light above the lens for a more natural look.
     

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