Anyone work with C# extensively?

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by SPACECATAZ, Jul 16, 2009.

  1. SPACECATAZ

    SPACECATAZ New Member

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    I've had a heck of time finding the right programming niche for myself ever since I switched from being a Marketing Major to a Computer Science major. I've tried C++, Python, PHP, Java, etc. The only real ones that stuck to me really were PHP and Java. I dabbled in web design/development over the past month and I've found it was interesting at first, but it's not something I could see myself doing on a career basis. My initial passion was for game development and it still is, so I started looking around and found C# which has the best of both worlds from Java and C++ although it's platform dependent. And they also use it for game development over at Microsoft. Is this something that I should go further into as a language? What's the career opportunity like for C# Developers?

    I also looked at Perl, but haven't seen any major reasons for me to dabble further at the current time. I have to take a advanced data structures class in Java this upcoming semester in which I'm not worried about, but Java isn't where I want to go in the end. I believe C# could get me to my goal faster.
     
  2. ge0

    ge0 New Member

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    if you are serious about game development.. c++ .. switch back to marketing.
     
  3. SPACECATAZ

    SPACECATAZ New Member

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    :rofl:, C++ is cool.

    I just wanted to try a different language like C# for now. :dunno:
     
  4. critter783

    critter783 OT Supporter

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    Don't focus too much on language if you're still in school. Focus on the abstracted topics you're learning about, like data structures. They're the same in any language. Data structures and algorithms are your tools; having them in several languages is like having specialized tools -- they essentially do the same thing, but one may be more appropriate in a given situation.

    That being said, C# is pretty neat. If you're interested in game development, check out XNA, and do some of the online tutorials for it. I know a lot of people will argue that its not industrial-strength, but it is a quick way to get to a result you'll be pleased with, and that's what will really keep you interested and engaged.
     
  5. bowrofl

    bowrofl New Member

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    Students can download Microsoft XNA for free from Microsoft DreamSpark, as long with VS 2008 Pro, and a bunch of other shit.

    https://www.dreamspark.com

    XNA Game Studio allows you to write games in C# for Windows, X-Box 360 or even Zune. If you are interested in writing games for any of those platforms, checking out XNA & C# might be worth it.

    I'm also interested in game development although I'm not a CS Major (yet... may switch into computers from my BA :hs:)... I'll probably start with C++and then move onto C#. Baby steps :hs:
     
  6. Fase

    Fase Your Face, In A Pickle Jar.

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    I thought Microsoft was canceling XNA for C#.
     
  7. SLED

    SLED build an idiot proof device and someone else will

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    C# is now a widespread language with plenty of job opportunities whether you want to do game design or business/enterprise type apps (obv. adjusted to the current market conditions). C# developers are high in demand.

    I also agree with critter above that as long as you learn to write excellent software (patterns, data structures, algorithms wise), then language SHOULDN'T matter..... however, it doesn't hurt to walk down the path that will give you the best chance to find a job (i.e. java or c#). There are a lot of kick ass languages out there, but just not much employment support at the current time. Experience is everything. I won't hire anybody with less than 3yrs .net/c# experience regardless of how good of a developer they are
     
  8. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    If you are passionate about game development, then you should focus on C++ and C#. The top studios have RIGOROUS C++ interviews, and what they're really looking for is someone passionate about learning C++ deeply, that realizes that C++ is vast and that you don't know SHIT about it. Nobody does. Its vastly complex. The correct answer to 'how well do you know C++' in a game interview is 6-8. Be expected to back that up.

    My brother is a top gaming AI guy and codes in C++ and C#, so focus on those. But more importantly: focus on whatever area interests you: graphics, AI, whatever.

    My brother is a hardcore C++ guy, but loves to code in C# because he gets so much more done. This is common in gaming.

    Anyway, the more important thing is for you to take an idea and turn it into usable, useful software. The language you use is secondary to the ability to do that.
     
  9. SPACECATAZ

    SPACECATAZ New Member

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    Ok, that makes sense to me. I knew you had to focus on a interest, i.e. graphics, sound, tools, w/e. I guess I will pick back up my C++ book and have another go at it.
     
  10. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    Well, look... you're probably going to be able to build things faster in C#. So you don't have to stop if you don't want. The key is to build whole, usable things. That is the core ability that will take you far. You could go back to C++ later. C# is certainly an easier place to start.

    Just keep in mind that you need to know C++ well to do well in gaming.
     
  11. SPACECATAZ

    SPACECATAZ New Member

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    Alright, that's what I thought as well. I have a month until school starts again, lets see what good it does me :mamoru:.

    Hopefully I can cover all of the MSDN on C# in 2 weeks.
     
  12. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    Don't cover the MSDN. Pick something you want to build, then build it. Use the books/internet as a reference. Learn as you go is the most important skill you can develop.
     
  13. bowrofl

    bowrofl New Member

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    :werd:. If you want to program specifically for game development, try this article:
    http://www.gamedev.net/reference/design/features/makegames/

    It gives ideas for games to try to attempt programming and why learning how to program a game like Tetris or Breakout works will teach you a lot about how games work.
     
  14. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    .

    If you want to code games - code games. What you can build on your own time during university will be your resume when you apply for your first job. It will put you on TOP of the stack.
     

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