anyone taking niacin?

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by bsr801, May 2, 2009.

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  1. bsr801

    bsr801 OT Supporter

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    ...if so can you tell me some bennefits and draw backs you have actualy noticed not just what the body nuilding forums say will happen. thanks guys
    :wavey:
     
  2. CPop

    CPop New Member

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    Benefits: Improved lipid profile.

    Drawbacks: Burn like a motherfucker.

    Some guys at work saw me taking niacin so they played high-stakes rock-paper-scissors to see who had to down 1g of niacin with an energy drink. My boss lost and spent the rest of the day looking like an oompa-loompa, then a crack addict in withdrawel when he started itching and couldn't stop scratching. It was seriously the most funny thing I've seen in a while.
     
  3. Blade

    Blade Time to swolercize

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    took it before, didnt notice anything. be sure to get the flush free.

    i think BDR has a good story about thinking niacin was melatonin or something like that.
     
  4. jmezz

    jmezz layin in bed stretchin my pumped quads for hours

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    Post your av.
     
  5. Merck

    Merck New Member

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  6. Primrose

    Primrose New Member

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    I take 1000mgs of the brand SloNiacin in the morning. Used to have an intense painful red flush all over but after a few months became used to it. Best way to get rid of a flush I've found is to drink a couple glasses of water.

    Here is a blog post about niacin uses from a cardiologist.

    http://heartscanblog.blogspot.com/

    Sunday, January 11, 2009

    Niacin scams

    In the Track Your Plaque program, we often resort to niacin (vitamin B3 or nicotinic acid) to:

    --Raise HDL cholesterol
    --Reduce the proportion of small LDL particles
    --Shift HDL towards the healthy larger fraction (HDL2b or "large")
    --Reduce lipoprotein(a), the most aggressive risk factor known


    But niacin comes with a crazy "hot flush," a warm, prickly feeling that usually envelops the upper chest, neck and face that is, without a doubt, annoying. Around 1 in 20 people simply cannot tolerate any amount of niacin >100 mg, while others have no problem even into the 3000 mg per day or more range. (Tolerance to niacin is genetically determined, governed by the rapidity of metabolism to the niacin metabolite, nicotinuric acid.)

    The niacin flush has spawned an entire panel of niacin-like scams, agents that sound like niacin or may even contain niacin, but exert no beneficial effect whatsoever:

    Flush-free niacin--I have previously posted on this useless but ubiquitous preparation that often costs several times more than conventional niacin. Flush-free niacin, or inositol hexaniacinate, does indeed contain niacin, but it is not released in the human body. You simply pass it out down the toilet, where this preparation belongs in the first place.

    Nicotinamide--Also called niacinamide. While the nicotinamide/niacinamide forms of vitamin B3 can be used to treat B3 deficiency ("pellagra"), they do not reproduce the lipid and lipoprotein effects of niacin. For our purposes, they are useless.

    Niacin-containing heart-healthy supplements--These are the multi-supplements that contain a little of everything that might be beneficial for the heart, but none at a dose that provides genuine benefit. Don't throw your money away.


    There's also a prescription niacin, Niaspan, that costs 20-fold more than the best over-the-counter preparation, Sloniacin. Niaspan has yielded hundreds of millions of dollars for the pharmaceutical industry. Your money, in my view, is far better spent on Sloniacin (around $12-14 per bottle of 100 tablets of 500 mg).

    For more on niacin, here's an article I wrote for the Life Extension Magazine people a while back: Using Niacin to Improve Cardiovascular Health.
     
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