Anyone here used MS Operations Manager before?

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by deusexaethera, Nov 19, 2009.

  1. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    It looks like it's used to centrally-manage other servers and workstations/laptops so IT doesn't have to dick around with manually installing software on each user's machine. Anyone have any experience using it? Is it worth using? Does it work well?
     
  2. BlazinBlazer Guy

    BlazinBlazer Guy Witness to The De-Evolution of Mankind.

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    MOM is oldballs by now.... System Center (Operations Manager/Configuration Manager/Virtual Machine Manager/etc.) is the new hotness. It does work well though in Active Directory environments.
     
  3. 5Gen_Prelude

    5Gen_Prelude There might not be an "I" in the word "Team", but

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    You can install software on machines without it though - as long as it's in MSI format, it's easily distributed via group policies. SC does more than that though - we're just too cheap to use it :p
     
  4. BlazinBlazer Guy

    BlazinBlazer Guy Witness to The De-Evolution of Mankind.

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    Oh yeah, without a doubt. Just depends how big of an organization you're trying to support, SC makes managing massive deployments much easier than manually creating GPOs.
     
  5. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    My server environment is heavily virtualized (i.e. remote desktop is the only way to touch them) and my workstation environment is distributed all over the country. Something that could let me indirectly trickle updates to users wherever they happen to be would make my job a lot easier.

    I found a program to disable automatic reboots after Windows Update does its thing, so I can configure laptops to download and install updates when users are likely to be online, which helps, but something that can push updates would be even better.
     
  6. BlazinBlazer Guy

    BlazinBlazer Guy Witness to The De-Evolution of Mankind.

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    You want a WSUS server, then. Set it up to push the specific updates you want it to do, disable auto reboots, then make a GPO that tells all your workstations/laptops to look to your WSUS box for downloading updates instead of going straight to MS. Easy as hell to set up.
     
  7. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Do I need to get software to do this, or is it built into Windows Server 2003?

    Also, it would be nice if I could push updates for non-Microsoft software as well.
     
  8. 5Gen_Prelude

    5Gen_Prelude There might not be an "I" in the word "Team", but

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    WSUS is a component of Windows 2003+, you can download it from MS for free. It will show you which workstations need updating, and you can centrally manage the approval of updates from it. It's pretty slick (albeit somewhat a bloated web app IMHO).

    Updates for other software - again depends on the format. For example, I pus out updates for Adobe products because they release their updates in MSI format, but not every company does this. You can wrestle with an MSI creator, or use ZAP files for non-MSI compliant software. This can all be done within W2K3 via group policies (Software Configuration). At the end of the day, it depends on what you want to update. MSSC is nice, just costs money, the alternatives make you work a little more but still get the job done, although the lack of reporting makes it difficult to know if every workstation did upgrade properly (with non-MS updates).
     

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