Anyone here go to Georgia Tech?

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by YodaHart, Aug 23, 2006.

  1. YodaHart

    YodaHart New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2006
    Messages:
    605
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm thinking of applying there for grad school within the next year or 2 to get my MSCS. I got my BS in Comp Sci at UCF in Orlando. I taking a trip to Atlanta next month to check out the area and any job possibilities.

    What do you think of the school and if you're in the MSCS program, what do you think of it? It looks like a full time program with classes, teaching and research, so I'm not sure how much time I'll have to work.
     
  2. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    19,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    Have you considered a software engineering program? It offers a wider variety of work, and greater creative control over the products you make. There's less coding to be done as an SE, but considering that coders can work for months or years on the same goddamn thing every single day, that's not a bad thing. It's good to have skills that can't be bought for 1/4 the cost in India.
     
  3. YodaHart

    YodaHart New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2006
    Messages:
    605
    Likes Received:
    0
    But I love coding. I think its good to have a mix of SE and the ability to code and problem solve.
     
  4. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    19,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    You can't become a software engineer without knowing how to code. You can become a coder without knowing how to draw up a design before you start coding, though.

    I'm working on a project at work right now to set up a long-term development strategy for a piece of digital mapping software the Navy is developing. It's infuriating -- the same two guys who came up with the idea have been writing the software for the past seven years, adding features to the version of the software being used by people online, without testing them first (because they know how they're supposed to work, right?), and with no overarching plan besides trying to get the software to where it's good enough for the Navy to use reliably. God help them.

    So we got hired to take the "fun" and the "art" out of their jobs (I hear that a lot, actually) and reduce them to doing what they're good at: writing functions that perform tasks, while the engineers (that's us) make sure the functions will all fit together into the design framework we've come up with.

    Coding is fun, but not when you're stripped of all creative control. You should seriously consider picking up some design-and-requirements, documentation, and customer-interaction courses at the very least.
     
  5. Jkuao

    Jkuao New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2004
    Messages:
    513
    Likes Received:
    0
    Graduated BS in Computer Science from GT. Undergrad program is all about weeding out the majority of the class. Grad program seems decent and the courses I took in the grad program were pretty rigorous and interesting. One of my coworkers is working on his masters there and working full time...he hates life these days.

    Software Engineering can be interesting assuming your customer isn't exponentially larger than your own company. Then it turns into death marches of development. Trying to fit 1200hrs of scoped development work into 5 weeks isn't nearly as fun when working in a team of 4.
     
  6. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    19,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    Heh. The Navy is definitely exponentially larger than my company. We've got about 200 people -- five people in my satellite office -- and my boss and myself are the only people working on the design. That said, the design is the only thing we're going to do. We've got a configuration manager working on-base in Hawaii supervising the implementation. It's the third long-term project on my plate. I like it; it gives me a chance to peel myself away from developing AutoCAD tools and writing user manuals.

    Jesus. I still can't believe two guys spent seven years writing that web app. It's mind-boggling. I mean, it's a nice web app, or at least it will be once its functionalities work predictably and reliably, but I can't believe they made it to version 3.0 -- mostly implemented, no less -- before their boss decided it would be a good idea if the design were on paper instead of in their heads. Not that the design is in their heads, though; they just sorta made it up as they went along.
     
  7. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Messages:
    14,017
    Likes Received:
    0
    You're back on this Software Engineering as seperate thing bullshit again.

    A masters in CS from Georgia Tech will impart the kind of skills one requires to be a good software engineer. Plus a decade's experience. There is no seperate SE path. This is not fucking community college.
     
  8. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2002
    Messages:
    14,017
    Likes Received:
    0
  9. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    19,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    See below:

    I don't know how you interpreted that, but what it says is that SE builds on CS because you can't design something if you don't know how it's built. That said, you damn well can build something without knowing how it's supposed to be put together. Except it won't come out right. Which is what I've seen happen time and time again with coders that have no design support.

    The designers, coders, and testers cannot be the same people, because the same people cannot be reliably expected to do what amounts to building a program twice and then pretend to be stupid about how the program works. I would much rather be on the creative end of the process (design) than stuck in a cubicle banging out function after function according to someone else's master plan. And if I want to play at being an artiste, I can write my own programs on my own time when I don't have to answer to someone else about it.

    Coded functions are like crankshafts; let the people with the industrial economies build them for a living, until they get skilled enough to move on to better things. I'm sorry if you don't like that idea, but that's how the wind's blowing these days.
     
  10. YodaHart

    YodaHart New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2006
    Messages:
    605
    Likes Received:
    0

Share This Page