anyone have studies on squats... ?

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by Leo95SE, Apr 1, 2006.

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  1. Leo95SE

    Leo95SE The OMINOUS one

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    im wondering, anyone know if studies have been done on the stress placed on the knees and ligaments for both full and parallel squats?
    i know everyone preaches that there is less knee stress with a full squat, but any electro-kinetic or something like that?
     
  2. hootpie

    hootpie New Member

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    I'm interested too.
     
  3. Grouch

    Grouch Guest

  4. Leo95SE

    Leo95SE The OMINOUS one

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    :love:

    One study used an instrument to measure anterior/posterior displace-
    ment of the tibia relative to the femur. Subjects performed varying depths of squats over an eight-
    week period. Additional data were collected on groups of weightlifters, powerlifters, and age-
    matched controls. Over the eight-week period, there was no increased instability created relative to
    depth of the squat. Thus, squats do not negatively affect knee stability.
    Using the same instrument, another group of researchers determined that acute bouts of exercise
    using a variety of activities (including squats) decreased stability of the knee joint, possibly due to
    muscle fatigue or elevated body temperature. Therefore, knee instability is not necessarily due to
    one specific exercise movement such as the squat. However, many exercises can cause acute
    instability due to other factors.
    Various forms of exercise have been shown to increase ligament strength. In animal studies, endur-
    ance exercise has been shown to increase the strength of the ligament-bone attachment, as well
    as increasing the diameter and collagen content of ligaments. When bone-ligament preparations are
    tested at high speeds, they fail at a higher maximum load. In athletes rehabilitating injured knees,
    closed-chain exercises such as the squat are currently used because in the squat, the hamstrings
    co-contract with other leg muscles to increase the stability of the knee, thus putting less stress on
    the anterior cruciate ligament

    and it gets better!

    thx man :)
     
  5. Sims.0

    Sims.0 New Member

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    squats build test.
    /thread
     
  6. Leo95SE

    Leo95SE The OMINOUS one

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    high quality input right there.
     
  7. AaronOC

    AaronOC Guest

    :ugh:
     
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