anyone have a pic of the anatomy of the knee?

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by njftw, Dec 19, 2008.

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  1. njftw

    njftw New Member

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    I've been lookin online but I can't find anything good.

    Didn't hurt it doing anything specific, but when I was getting out of the car after the gym last night I felt it kind of tweak (not a leg day). And now if I put pressure on it in a certain way it gives me a really sharp pain, feels like it is coming from the dead middle of my knee. Under the bone, sharp pain... :wtc:

    I can walk fine, and I can do a squatting motion, but in certain spots if I put pressure on my right leg, I feel the shooting pain in my knee.

    I also have osgood-slaughters in my right knee, but this is a total different pain...
     
  2. evolude

    evolude OT Supporter

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    "dead middle of your knee... under the bone" is where your ACL/PCL is naturally connecting the femur to your tibia.


    Go to a doc ASAP.
     
  3. njftw

    njftw New Member

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    [​IMG]
     
  4. erok81

    erok81 All your canyons are belong to me!!

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  5. njftw

    njftw New Member

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    its just weird because I didn't feel any sort of pop or tear on my last leg day and when I'm not in the gym I am pretty non-active besides walking around...

    I can still walk/stand/sit fine.... maybe it's a small tear in the pcl? Or maybe i just strained it... idk, if it doesn't go away soon I'll see the doc
     
  6. Ribbie

    Ribbie OT Supporter

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    Bad Knee crew holla.

    Sounds like a loose body (piece of cartilage) floating around. It's part of your meniscus that breaks down naturally over time. Some people (me) have had problems with a big chunk floating around and not breaking down. I had arthroscopic surgery to correct my knee issue and they took out a huge ass chunk. Now I have arthritis in that knee and limited mobility. :wtc:

    Go see your doctor, but it sounds like you've got the same thing I had happening. Good luck.
     
  7. njftw

    njftw New Member

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    :squint:

    I hope not. Sorry you have to go through that shicakka
     
  8. evolude

    evolude OT Supporter

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  9. njftw

    njftw New Member

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    on the first diagram, the pain comes from slightly lower than the patella, but it's hard to tell because thats where I have a HUGE bump from osgood-slaughters so when I try and feel around it gets confusing... but it seems like its coming from about 1/4-1/2" below my patella, inside the knee :dunno:
     
  10. njftw

    njftw New Member

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    my just be old osgood actin up... I hope anyway
     
  11. evolude

    evolude OT Supporter

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    that doesn't sound like the ligaments but I would still get it checked.
     
  12. njftw

    njftw New Member

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    Thanks for the advice, I probably still will.

    What causes Osgood Schlatters disease?

    The patella tendon inserts at the tibial tuberosity and through overuse can tug away at the bone causing inflammation. It is seen more often in children involved with running and jumping activities which put a much greater strain on the patella tendon. With repeated trauma New bone grows back during the healing which causes a bony lump which is often felt at the tibial tuberosity. It mainly affects boys aged 10 to 16 years old and will clear up when they stop growing and the tendons become stronger, however, it can rarely persist into adulthood.












    For the fucking lose
     
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