Any storage admins?

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by Scoob_13, Feb 12, 2005.

  1. Scoob_13

    Scoob_13 Anything is possible, but the odds are astronomica

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2001
    Messages:
    73,791
    Likes Received:
    38
    Location:
    Fort Worth. Hooray cowgirls.
    I've been leaning more and more towards specializing in this since it's rather enjoyable to me. It could also help that I'm now in charge of disaster recovery, data management, and storage :o But without a raise :squint:

    Anyhow, what did you study, outside of a CS/MIS degree (seeing as I'm in the middle of my CS degree), to get to where you are? I'm just looking for some general information, really.
     
  2. crontab

    crontab (uid = 0)

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2000
    Messages:
    23,446
    Likes Received:
    12
    I graduated with an electrical engineering degree. Started as a UNIX admin, now UNIX admin/Storage Admin. Didn't learn a thing from college to help me become a storage admin or to get me where I am. Can't think of any course that can relate...
     
  3. IAMwhitey

    IAMwhitey New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2001
    Messages:
    1,010
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    what do you mean by storage? I am a backup admin... so i guess you could stay i store things..

    I went to school for Information Sciences.
     
  4. Scoob_13

    Scoob_13 Anything is possible, but the odds are astronomica

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2001
    Messages:
    73,791
    Likes Received:
    38
    Location:
    Fort Worth. Hooray cowgirls.
    Data warehousing, data control, dba's, backup, etc.
     
  5. IAMwhitey

    IAMwhitey New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2001
    Messages:
    1,010
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    ok, well i do backups using a Legato System. I started with the company as a Level 1 Tech in May and now I am a Backup Admin and Windows Admin.

    I got my degree in IS, but i got to where i am today by hard work.
     
  6. crontab

    crontab (uid = 0)

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2000
    Messages:
    23,446
    Likes Received:
    12
    A Storage Admin is one who admin large amounts of storage. DBA's are not considered storage admins. I have not seen one DBA that knows how to carve up lun(s) for their own DBA needs. They just want this and they don't care how. We're also not talking about simply setting up RAID sets or swapping out disks or partitioning or baby crap like that.

    A storage admin is in charge of either a tape/disk SAN or NAS or both, it's fibre fabric meshes, all the switches, all of the zoning, all appliances, all the HBA's on the hosts attached. Make sure everything plays nice, firmware, driver versions are up to date and supported by ALL vendors in play, a form of multi-pathing or transparent failover is in place, etc. Ensure that all hosts have optimal performance by tweaking the kernel depending on application running on hosts, tweaking the HBA drivers, tweaking software raid i/o parameters, that the presented volumes from the SAN or NAS is constructed optimally according to vendor specs for the applications and data type. That nothing is saturated and no resources idlely wasted. Ensure that there is always enough spare disks or space for failures. Ensure any and ALL type of SAN failure is invisible to the host. And a ton of other crap. A storage admin may or may not be in charge of designing or architecting the SAN infrastructure, but most certainly is involved.

    Now some Storage admins are unfortunately both a storage admin and backup admin. A backup admin ensures everything gets backed up. Ensure that the backup infrastructure can handle the exponential data growth in the static back up time frame. Audits backups to ensure the backup software package is doing its job. Ensure restores take 1 : (x backup streams per device) amount of time. Ideally 1:1 depending on the backup hardware. A very tedious pain staking task that is shunned by many people. I unfortunately have to do these two jobs and admin a few hundred unix machines to boot. Gets a bit exciting at times...
     
  7. Mikey D

    Mikey D New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2002
    Messages:
    6,666
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Royal Oak, MI

    You talk so geek :love: I hope you use TSM for your backups :mad:
     
  8. crontab

    crontab (uid = 0)

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2000
    Messages:
    23,446
    Likes Received:
    12
    Nope, we can't stand IBM Tivoli Storage Manager. Legato Networker 7.x with an STK SN6000.
     
  9. IAMwhitey

    IAMwhitey New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2001
    Messages:
    1,010
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Pittsburgh, PA
    got to love the Legato, unless you have to call them for support... I just started as Backup Admin two weeks ago so I am still learning the ropes. the guy before me was fired for looking at porn all day, and now i am going in kinda just feeling my way through the system. what fun.
     
  10. Mikey D

    Mikey D New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2002
    Messages:
    6,666
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Royal Oak, MI
    Legato!!!

    I've actually used both, Tivoli more so than Legato.

    Tivoli has a sharp learning curve but it's capable of so much. Legato works if you do that full/incremental routine.
     
  11. Scoob_13

    Scoob_13 Anything is possible, but the odds are astronomica

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2001
    Messages:
    73,791
    Likes Received:
    38
    Location:
    Fort Worth. Hooray cowgirls.
    Right now my company has problems justifying spending money on IT infrastructure that's required for this sort of thing. The only reason we picked up a SAN was because of our document imaging process.


    And now we're going to have to incorporate that SAN into whatever plans we come up with since we're estimating a growth of 6 to 8TB a year (due to the imaging alone).

    How we're going to back this data up (other than replicating out to an external site - which they still haven't approved) is still up in the air - my suggestion of decent disaster recovery methods is pretty much ignored because they cost A) money and B) time
     

Share This Page