amp and woofer questions, im new to this, please help me out

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by robbinthehood, Mar 12, 2004.

  1. robbinthehood

    robbinthehood New Member

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    Right now I'm driving a 2000 subaru impreza 2.5 rs and its got the stock speakers in it but i put in an alpine CDA-9807 head unit. the speakers i have dont support much base and have that fuzzy crappy sound to them. ive been looking into getting a subwoofer or new speakers or something but im not sure what i should do first. should i just get a 2 channel amplifier and put half the power to a sub and half to the speakers that are already in the car? or should i invest in some new speakers before i go for the amp and sub? if i kept the speakers i have now and got a sub, would an amp make the speakers sound better and still produce good bass from the sub? any help and advice is welcomed, i dont really know a whole lot about car audio. thanks.
     
  2. 04

    04 Guest

    I would get the new speakers before the amp and sub. Speakers are almost always the weakest link - by far. However, note that by simply replacing the speakers you probably wont get much more bass, you'll really want a sub if you want decent levels of bass output.

    If you bought simply an amplifier and sub, you wouldnt get any better sound at low volumes, it would only get louder, which IS pretty important if you listen at high levels.
     
  3. robbinthehood

    robbinthehood New Member

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    alright thanks, i just talked with my dad and he has a powered sub and an amp at his house that isnt currently in use and he told me he'd send them to me so im set in that department. i think the speakers i have now will sound decent when the bass is taken away by the sub. when i turn the bass all the way down they sound decent and its got 2 tweeters too.
     
  4. BlackHBDX

    BlackHBDX The grey fixer

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    If you turn the bass all the way down on the head unit, it will make the sub sound like ass. Your best bet would be to just replace the speakers but if you insist on keeping the factory speakers, just install a passive, high-pass crossover (bass-blocker). Here is an example:
    http://www.crutchfield.com/S-kZNKox...0&c=11&g=761&I=127BB150A2&o=m&a=0&cc=01&avf=N
    or
    http://www.sounddomain.com/sku/LITBB4100

    I don't know how your speakers sound so I can't make a suggestion as to what frequency "bass-blocker" you should buy. 100Hz or 150Hz should be good. No higher than 300Hz though.
     
  5. 04

    04 Guest

    Those bass blockers are ineffective at protecting your speakers from low frequencies. In many cases they actually increase the bass that you are trying to remove. If you add a shunt inductor you CAN make an effective bass blocker. However, an inductor of this size is going to be very large and will cost over 10 dollars.
     
  6. robbinthehood

    robbinthehood New Member

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    i dont understand why turning the bass down on my speakers and using the sub for my bass would make the bass sound bad? my head unit has a separate option for bass and sub, so couldnt i just turn off the bass in my speakers and turn it up in the sub to make it sound fine?
     
  7. 04

    04 Guest

    The problem with that is you don't know the "shape" of the bass control on the headunit. It may be centered at 100hz, and have a very wide bandwidth affecting frequencies from as low as 20hz to as high as 300hz for example. The subwoofer on the other hand, will have its filter only majorly affecting frequencies above a given point, say 100hz. This would cause a problem in the tonal response of your system. Also, when you turn the bass down on your headunit, it will turn the bass down for your subwoofer as well.
     
  8. BlackHBDX

    BlackHBDX The grey fixer

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    An inductor (coil) would be used as a low-pass, passive crossover. You would use a capacitor as a high-pass, passive crossover. That's all a bass-blocker is, a cap.
     
  9. 04

    04 Guest

    Yes I know this. Thats why I said to put the Inductor in PARALLEL (shunt) with the woofer. The inductor provides damping, because without it, the capacitor is free to react with the inductance of the woofer's voice coil and create a resonance BELOW the simulated crossover frequency of the capacitor. If you choose a small enough capacitor, it would be more effective removing low frequencies, but if you do that, your speakers wont play anything but midrange, leaving a big hole between the subwoofer and speakers.

    Bottom line is, if your speaker was a resistor they would work great. However, it's not...
     

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