AMD Athlon 64 X2 6400+ Overheating

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by Kuwi, May 14, 2009.

  1. Kuwi

    Kuwi Active Member

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    it idles around 55C, on a full load it will go as high as 80C which it will then blue screen, i've tried reapplying thermal paste but that didn't work, I put house fan by it, it only lowered by a few degrees, and the motherboard is a Gigabyte GA-M61P-S3.
     
  2. Doc Brown

    Doc Brown Don't make me make you my hobby

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    Stock fan?
     
  3. Kuwi

    Kuwi Active Member

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    Yeah.
     
  4. Doc Brown

    Doc Brown Don't make me make you my hobby

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    Well I would think your stock temps would have been better than what you're getting. But still, an aftermarket cooler might do wonders.

    You can either go with one of the big tower coolers, or you could go with a low profile style like Zalman sells.
    The CNPS8700 is a heat pipe design, and cools within a couple of degrees of the better coolers.
    I like them because they're out of your way if you have to reach into the case. And being so low to the motherboard, it has the interesting effect of cooling the surrounding cpu socket area.
    And they're fairly quiet, as well.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835118030


    http://www.xbitlabs.com/articles/coolers/display/zalman-cnps8700led-ttv1.html
     
  5. Kuwi

    Kuwi Active Member

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    What about something like this? http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835103050
     
  6. Doc Brown

    Doc Brown Don't make me make you my hobby

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    You could try to google it to see if there's any decent review of it. It might do ok, but my guess is it won't be any better than the stock cooler.

    There's plenty of good coolers that are more affordable than the Zalman is.
     
  7. Doc Brown

    Doc Brown Don't make me make you my hobby

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  8. barfdogg

    barfdogg OT Supporter

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    Make sure you get rid of ALL of the old thermal paste, on both the CPU and HS.

    What type of paste are you applying? Not all are created equal... If it is chunky/old or shit brand throw away.

    MORE IS NOT BETTER! Make sure you only apply enough thermal paste to thinly coat the surface... Adding too much not only makes a mess, but can make heat transfer less efficient by pushing the heat sink farther away from the CPU. Also some pastes are conductive and damage components if it squirts out the side onto something.

    How smooth is the surface of your heatsink? You may consider lapping the surface, if warranted. (probably fine, but thought id add, it can only help)

    Is the fan blowing the correct direction? is it spinning at manufacturer specifed range?

    While cooler is always better, and an aftermarket heatsink will lower the temperature, the OEM fan IS sufficiant for a normal non gamer/overclock enviornment... "so if all you want is for the PC to just work" than spending money on equipment that isnt neccassary may not be what you are looking to do. AMD would not ship a HS that could not keep the CPU at a reasonably safe tempurature.
     
  9. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    The stock heatsink is definitely a problem, and mixing old/new thermal goop is a problem too because it can introduce microscopic bubbles between the CPU and the heatsink, but the thickness of the goop isn't as big of a deal as it used to be -- the springs that hold heatsinks in place nowadays have more than enough force to squeeze out any excess thermal goop so it doesn't insulate the CPU from the heatsink.

    That being said, you don't want to waste the stuff, so applying just enough to cover the top of the CPU is still a good idea. I'm a fan of spreading the stuff out with my pinky finger first, instead of just putting a blob in the center of the CPU, because that way I know the goop will cover every last square millimeter of the CPU surface -- there is no such guarantee if you let the heatsink squish the goop around for you.

    Lapping (flattening and polishing) the heatsink can help if its really cheap, but any heatsink worth its price tag nowadays will already be lapped. Manufacturers don't just ignore things like this that can help them score more sales than their competitors.
     
  10. SeeVinceRun

    SeeVinceRun Currently In Prison OT Supporter

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    Doesn't the 6400+ have the copper heat pipe cooler? Same one as the new phenoms, I thought.

    If a house fan wasn't cooling it down, it sounds like its mounted improperly and not just a shitty heatsink.

    I had that motherboard with a 4100+ then a 8750 triple core, both with stock coolers, both idled around 27c, got up to 45c under load.
     
  11. JadedFlower

    JadedFlower New Member

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    Ive got one of those (CPU) and when i bought it i noticed that it tends to overheat too. I picked up a nice heatsink/fan combo and loaded my case up with about 6 fans now and its fine now.
     
  12. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    If it does have a heatpipe, then the mounting angle could be a factor as well. In the case of looped heatpipes, it doesn't matter so much, but for non-looped heatpipes, the end of the pipe closest to the fan needs to be higher than the end of the pipe closest to the CPU. Heatpipes work through steam convection, so if it isn't oriented so steam can drift up to the fan and cool water can drip back down to the CPU, it will do nothing useful.
     

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