Alternative to Notebook Hardware Control for processor throttling?

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by Deevan, Mar 18, 2010.

  1. Deevan

    Deevan Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2005
    Messages:
    11,719
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Orlando, FL USA Posts: 4
    Doesn't seem to work on anything newer than a Core 2. Anyone use another utility? Preferably one that has been updated since 2007.
     
  2. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    19,712
    Likes Received:
    0
  3. Deevan

    Deevan Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2005
    Messages:
    11,719
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Orlando, FL USA Posts: 4
    Yes, I'm aware of SpeedStep and have tried several configurations in the BIOS for this, I'm still having heat issues on the laptop. Even when doing no tasks in Windows, themes service disabled and NIC turned off it isn't throttling down the frequency. The amount of power used doesn't change whether speedstep is on or off. (Played with DHA as well, the cores will throttle up higher, but not lower.)

    Up to date BIOS and chip set drivers... I suppose it could be an OS issue.
     
  4. ldaggerl

    ldaggerl New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2009
    Messages:
    924
    Likes Received:
    0
    What kind of heat issue are you having?
     
  5. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    19,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    Even with no foreground tasks running, there's still upwards of 50 services running on a stock Windows Vista install. They're ALWAYS doing something these days.

    Is the Indexing service off? Does the hard drive ever spin down? If the hard drive is spinning constantly, it'll generate about as much heat as the CPU, but you don't notice as much because it's spread over a larger surface area. Does your screen have an LED or CCF backlight? CCF backlights are much less efficient than LEDs, but they're cheaper so LEDs are usually only used in higher-end laptops. What kind of video card do you have? Is it configured to reduce power when it's not being used? Are you running any sort of monitoring programs that show realtime readouts on-screen? That can also prevent the computer from reducing power, because it's running the monitoring program constantly.

    All of this assumes your laptop's motherboard supports all of the low-power features Intel offers, too. Was it labeled as a Centrino machine? If not, then the power-reducing functions may not work because the hardware isn't all paying attention to the CPU when the CPU says it's time to relax.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2010

Share This Page