Acne, Stretch Marks, and Gyno

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by Red-Level, Aug 9, 2005.

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  1. Red-Level

    Red-Level New Member

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    I hope this information is useful!

    Acne

    What Causes Acne?


    One of the most important things you can learn about acne is this:
    It's not your fault. Contrary to popular belief, acne is not caused by anything you're doing — what you eat, how often you wash your face or work out — but by a combination of factors at work far beneath the surface of your skin.

    A blemish begins approximately 2–3 weeks before it appears on your skin's surface. It starts in your sebaceous hair follicles — the tiny holes commonly called pores. Deep within each follicle, your sebaceous glands are working to produce sebum, the oil that keeps your skin moist and pliable. As your skin renews itself, the old cells die, mix with your skin's natural oils, and are sloughed off. Under normal circumstances, these cells are shed gradually, making room for fresh new skin.

    But sloughing is different for everyone. Some people shed cells evenly; some don't. Uneven shedding causes dead cells to become sticky, clumping together to form a plug — much like a cork in a bottle. This plug, or comedo, traps oil and bacteria inside the follicle.

    Why Me?

    There is no one simple "cause" of acne — the condition is influenced by many factors, many which are out of your control. The regularity with which you shed skin cells can change throughout your life. The rate at which you produce sebum is affected by your hormone balance, which is often in flux — especially for women. Research has also shown that genetics play a big part in the development and persistence of acne, so your family history is a valuable prediction tool as well.

    What can I do?

    One of the best weapons in the fight against acne, however, is knowledge; if you know what causes it, it's easier to formulate a good plan of attack. There are five primary culprits contributing to this process. Each of these factors may vary dramatically between individuals. While you don't have control over these factors, understanding them can help you in your search for the proper treatment.

    What can I do? Fortunately, you have options! There are many kinds of acne treatment available today. But first, you should try to determine the type and severity of your condition. Acne, like a person, is highly individual — it can take many forms, and have a highly variable response to treatment. The more you know about your specific form of acne, the more likely you are to find a treatment that works for you. Learn more about the types of acne.

    Preventing Acne

    One of the most common misconceptions about acne is that it's caused by dirt. It's not! Acne is caused by a combination of factors you can't control, like your hormone balance and the natural pace of your skin's renewal system. Fortunately, there are a number of things you can control that may help you keep your acne in check. Begin by following these simple suggestions for healthy-skin hygiene.

    Don't over-wash Since dirt is not causing your acne, excessive scrubbing and washing won't make it go away. Try to limit yourself to two washings per day — anything more than that can leave your healthy skin dry, and your acne-prone areas irritated. Habitual over-washing may also stimulate extra oil production, which could result in more breakouts.

    Skip harsh scrubs. It's okay to exfoliate, but be sure to use a gentle formula with small, smooth grains. Avoid products with almond or apricot shell fragments; they can irritate or even tear your skin and further aggravate your acne.

    Say no to alcohol. If you use a toner, avoid products with high concentrations of isopropyl alcohol, or common rubbing alcohol. A strong astringent, alcohol strips the top layer of your skin, causing your sebaceous glands to produce more oil. The result? Dry, red skin — and possibly more blemishes.

    Don't squeeze or pick. Squeezing or picking your blemishes — with fingernails, pins or anything else — can force bacteria deeper into the skin, causing greater inflammation and infection. You'll also increase the damage to the surrounding skin, so the blemish is more likely to leave a permanent scar.

    Hands off! Propionibacterium acnes (the bacteria that causes breakouts) is a normal resident of your skin; it doesn't lead to acne until it gets trapped inside the hair follicle. Excessive touching of your face, including rubbing or even resting your chin in your hands, can drive bacteria into your pores — where it can begin its dirtywork.

    Work out, wash off. When you exercise, your movement generates heat; clothing and equipment cause friction. Until you shower off, heat and moisture are trapped against your skin, creating an ideal breeding ground for the spread of bacteria. So whenever you can, shower off immediately after exercising.

    Find a regimen and stick with it. Most cases of mild acne can be improved with "over-the-counter" products, or products that don't require a prescription from your doctor. There is a wide range of treatments available, and there’s a good chance one of them will work for you. If you start treatment before your acne gets severe, you’ll have a better chance of avoiding physical and emotional problems down the road. But if your acne gets worse or lasts more than a couple of weeks, see a dermatologist. Here's a quick listing of the most common products used to treat acne — click on the links that interest you for more information on that course of treatment.

    Exercise and Acne Prevention

    Make-up. When exercising, wear as little make-up as possible. Even oil-free and non-comedogenic (non-pore-clogging) cosmetics can clog pores if worn during heavy exercise. When you’re done working out, wash as soon as possible.

    Sunscreen. If your regimen takes you outdoors, always wear sunscreen. While acne may improve slightly after brief periods in the sun, studies show that prolonged exposure actually promotes comedones (clogged pores) and, of course, sun damage. Some kinds of acne medication make skin more sensitive to the sun, so sunscreen is even more important. When choosing a sunscreen, look for products that are oil-free and have a protection factor of at least SPF 15 for both UVA and UVB rays. Like make-up, sunscreen can travel across the skin’s surface and lodge in the pores — so wash immediately after working out.

    Clothing. If you’re prone to body acne, avoid garments made exclusively with lycra or nylon. Why? Some synthetic fabrics can trap the heat and moisture against your skin, creating a fertile breeding ground for the bacteria that contribute to acne. For moderate exercise, your best bet is lightweight, loose-fitting cotton, or a lycra-cotton blend. Natural fabrics allow the skin to breathe, and loose garments are less likely to cause friction. If you’re exercising vigorously and working up a good sweat, however, you may want to try some of the new fabrics designed to wick moisture away from your skin.

    Equipment. Some people are more likely to get acne or have their lesions aggravated in the areas affected by sports equipment. The best defense against friction-related breakouts is a good fit — make sure your helmet doesn’t slide around on your forehead, or your wetsuit isn’t too tight under the arms. You can also curb equipment-triggered breakouts by lining your helmet with a layer of soft, washable cotton fabric; it's a great use for those old t-shirts, too. And no matter what the sport, it’s always a good idea to keep your equipment clean and dry when not in use.

    Moisture. Mom was right: You should get out of those wet clothes! No matter how you get your exercise — treadmill, trail, tennis court, or whatever — don’t sit around in your sweaty clothes or wet bathing suit when you’re done. If you can, shower off immediately and change into dry clothes before driving home. If this isn’t possible, change into dry clothes and wipe down as well as you can. When toweling sweat off your face, always use a clean towel, and blot gently rather than wipe. Vigorous wiping can irritate your skin, driving make-up and sunscreen deeper into the pores.

    Showering. Again, it’s best to shower immediately after working out. You may want to use a medicated exfoliant cleanser, but always be gentle with your skin. Scrubbing harder isn’t going to make you any cleaner, or make your acne go away — and it may actually irritate existing lesions or promote the development of new ones. If you can't shower right away, you can still curb breakouts by wiping down with medicated pads; keep a few in your gym bag just in case.

    So keep up the good work! A healthy exercise program is an integral part of your overall health; and a healthy body is more likely to have healthy skin. Just keep an eye on the various factors that accompany your regimen, and try to remove the acne triggers — you’ll be on your way to breakout-free workouts.

    Acne Treatments

    Proactiv http://www.proactiv.com/index.php?acnt=ACPPF01H
    Retin-A https://ortho.harte-hanks.com/retin...gleadwords.html

    ABOVE INFORMATION WAS FOUND HERE: http://www.acne.com/index.php

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    Stretch Marks

    About Stretch Marks


    Stretch marks are a normal part of puberty for most girls and guys. When a person grows or gains weight really quickly (like during puberty), that person may get fine lines on the body called stretch marks. Stretch marks happen when the tissue under the skin is pulled by rapid growth or stretching. Although the skin is usually fairly elastic, when it's overstretched, the normal production of collagen (the major protein that makes up the connective tissue in your skin) is disrupted. As a result, scars called stretch marks may form.

    If you're noticing stretch marks on your body, you're not alone - most girls and women have stretch marks (in girls, they tend to show up on places like the breasts, thighs, hips, and butt, and many women get them during pregnancy). And although stretch marks are more common in girls, guys can get them, too.

    Bodybuilders are more prone to getting stretch marks because of the rapid body changes that bodybuilding can produce. People who are obese often have stretch marks. Stretch marks are also more likely to occur if a person uses steroid-containing creams or ointments (such as hydrocortisone) on their skin for more than a few weeks, or if a person has to take high doses of corticosteroids by mouth for months or longer.


    At first, stretch marks may show up as reddish or purplish lines that may appear indented and have a different texture from the surrounding skin. Fortunately, stretch marks often turn lighter (whitish or flesh-colored) and almost disappear over time. But the fact that stretch marks usually fade and become less noticeable over time can be little consolation if you plan to spend most of your summer in a bathing suit.

    There are some things that you can do to make stretch marks less noticeable.

    Some people find that sunless tanning treatments (both over-the-counter lotions and sprays and in-salon types of treatments) can help cover up stretch marks. This doesn't work for regular tanning or tanning beds, though, because stretch marks themselves are less likely to tan. (And as everyone knows, the sun and tanning beds do more harm than good when it comes to the long-term health of your skin). You can also buy body makeup that, when matched to the tone of your skin, makes stretch marks all but invisible. Although some manufacturers make these cover-up products water-resistant, makeup may not be the best solution if you'll be spending a lot of time in the water.

    Speaking of pool or beach time, the good news is that current fashion favors many styles of bathing suits that also just happen to hide stretch marks. "Boy short" style suits (popular with many athletes because they don't ride up when a person moves) work well for hiding stretch marks on the buttocks and upper thighs. And because many swimmers prefer high-neck bathing suits, which can hide stretch marks in the chest area, there are usually lots of styles to choose from.

    Although there are tons of creams and other skin products on the market that claim to eliminate stretch marks, the truth is that most of these products are ineffective and often costly. You can't make stretch marks go away entirely without the help of a dermatologist (a doctor who specializes in treating skin problems) or plastic surgeon. These doctors may use one of many types of treatments, from actual surgery to techniques such as microdermabrasion and laser treatment, that reduce the appearance of stretch marks. These techniques are expensive and are not usually recommended for people in their teen years because they are not finished growing and their stretch marks will probably diminish over time anyway.

    Reviewed by: Patrice Hyde, MD
    Date reviewed: April 2004

    ABOVE INFORMATION WAS FOUND HERE: http://kidshealth.org/teen/your_bod...etch_marks.html

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    Gynecomastia

    What is Gyno?


    The term comes from the Greek words gyne meaning "woman" and mastos meaning "breast." In practical terms, this means abnormally large breasts on men.
    The condition is relatively common in adolescent boys, and 90% of the time symptoms disappear in a matter of months, or, as adolescence wanes, a few years later. But the remaining 10% are burdened with a social handicap that causes a deep and complex shame, and puts one's relationship with one's body at risk.

    There are several potential causes:

    -puberty
    -steroid abuse (bitch tits)
    -obesity
    -marijuana use (this is in question)
    -tumors
    -genetic disorders
    -chronic liver disease
    -side effects of many medications
    -castration
    -Klinefelter Syndrome
    -Gilbert's Syndrome
    -aging

    The Remedy

    In cases of obesity, weight loss can alter the gynecomastic condition, but for many it will not eliminate it. For all other causes, surgery is the only known physical remedy. Once the physical encumbrance is lifted, psychological scars still need to be addressed. One must come to terms with one's body, accept it, and heal the wounds from the past.

    Psychological Issues

    Gynecomastia can be emotionally devastating. Feelings of shame, embarrassment and humiliation are common. One does not feel masculine in a society where masculinity is exalted. Self-hate threads itself through all aspects of the individual's life, creating an insidious web of powerlessness. A man or boy with gynecomastia struggles with anxiety over such simple acts as taking off his shirt at the beach.

    For many men, the best solution is surgery. That accomplishes step one of the healing. Step two is psychological redress. From childhood taunting to a lifetime of hating his chest, the hurt feelings will not go away with the fact of breast reduction alone.

    Men who have developed gynecomastia later in life from steroid abuse or some other cause may have little to no psychological distress. However, for some in this situation, it can leave them feeling out of control of their body or emasculated in some matter. Hopefully, corrective surgery will resolve these feelings, for some it will not and therapy will needed to relieve the distress.

    It is important to recognize the scars on the inside. This is difficult work because it means coming to terms with one's body and past. Acknowledging the pain, moving into a new relationship with one's body and changing how he thinks the world sees him is the key to healing and freedom.

    Men often have a very difficult time talking about their breasts to anyone, but it is the first step toward relief. Realizing that they are not alone is a powerful antidote for the shame and a beginning toward healing.

    ABOVE INFORMATION WAS FOUND HERE: http://www.gynecomastia.org/content...al/gynart.shtml

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    Last edited: Jan 18, 2007
  2. Neo95gt

    Neo95gt Guest

    good shit broly
     
  3. valvefloat

    valvefloat OT Supporter

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    nice post mang.
     
  4. zyg0te

    zyg0te I've made a huge mistake.

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    :cool: good read
     
  5. MiseryIndex

    MiseryIndex i never know why. i only know who. Moderator

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  6. xpinchx

    xpinchx hes got a nice cock, on the thin side but its stil

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    Top 3 reposts on F&N. Nice to see it all compiled in one place. Maybe we can make this a sticky.
     
  7. Maverik60

    Maverik60 New Member

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    ^^ ye..

    not top3. but acnes a bitch. specially whiteheads..
     
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