SRS A question for those who got out of their addition

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by kag, Jul 25, 2005.

  1. kag

    kag Jedi Master

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    I've never been addicted to anything, so this might sound like a silly question.

    When you are, for example, alcoholic and after many years of drinking, you decide it's time to quit, is it like controlling your "need for alcohol" or are you actually able to "throw it out of your life" completely?

    The reason I'm asking this, is because you often hear people saying that they have been sober for XX years. It always sounds to me like they still have the addiction inside them, but they are strong enough mentally to overcome their envy. After a few years, do you feel like it was another person back then because you don't think about it anymore or is it a daily task to keep yourself on the right track?

    I know my grandpa was a huge smoker, 2-3 packs a day, and he quit smoking a long time ago. But I remember him saying that everytime he smells a cigarette, he thinks it smells so good, but he has to resist.

    It's hard to write it down the way it's in my mind, I hope you will understand what I'm trying to say.
     
  2. nukegoat

    nukegoat New Member

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    The goal of recovery isn't learning to moderate but rather being able to abstain and deal with life on life's terms. I'm not sure what else you're asking though :hs:
     
  3. eligh

    eligh Go To A Meeting

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    The desire to drink remains for a certain period of time, depending on the person. Personally, I've lost my desire to drink, and it's very rare that I get urges to use drugs or drink anymore. This is the beauty of 12-step recovery, most people in the program lose the obsession to use or drink. People who never really lose this desire are constantly fighting the obsession, and that can be referred to as "white knuckling it."

    The only daily task is to continue to practice the principles in the 12-steps in our lives. Basically we try not to cause any more wreckage (while clean) in our lives and be conscious of our own behavior towards ourselves and others. However, we are never able to moderate alcohol or drugs again, we remain abstinent. If we stay on top of our program, usually our desire to use is not there.

    Smoking is a different issue. From what I've heard, a cigarette always smells good even after 10+ years of not smoking. I could say that a joint oftentimes smells good as well, but it doesn't give me as strong of an urge as a cigarette would if I was quitting.
    That's the best I can do, hope I was able to answer your questions.
     
  4. johnny

    johnny shit, baby

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    I don't really ever crave cigarettes, but I'm sure I could very, very easily jump right back into 2-3 packs a day with little effort.
     
  5. Woodman

    Woodman New Member

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    I have "X yrs" clean. My disease will forever be "inside" me. Not sure I understand your "envy" comment. For me it isn't envy. For me it is gratefulness (to the program itself, the people along the way that have helped and ultimately - my HP). 12 Step recovery works. Before I got here, nothing worked.

    I was definitly "another person" back then. Another X years from now, I hope to be another person than I am today. :)

    It's a daily task to not revert back. But (thankfully) not a difficult task.
    Learning to apply & live the 12 steps (as best I can on any given day) is all it takes.

    Hope this has helped answer your questions.
     

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