A good "home" router?

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by 04, Dec 24, 2002.

  1. 04

    04 Guest

    I need to get a new router for the following reasons:

    1. I only have 3 static public IP's from my internet service provider
    2. I have 6 computers, soon 7.
    3. I suppose a firewall would be nice
    4. DHCP is easy :fawk:

    So, I was thinking about a unit like this http://www.dlink.com/products/broadband/di604/pdfs/DI604_DS.pdf

    It says it only supports 4 computers, however. I was thinking that it only supported 4 computers because of 4 physical rj-45 jacks. But I looked at their more expensive, 90 dollar router, and it has 7 physical jacks, but says it can support 253 connections.

    I need something that can be expanded in the future. If that little router can't support more than 4 computers, its worthless to me.

    Also, 2 of the machines (my brother's) will still be getting their static ips like normally. I would just interface my network with theirs so that I could get internet access and browse their files.

    Another option I suppose would be to configure a machine as a firewall/router/dhcp/domain server using linux. That would be ok, I suppose, but would I get too much of a performance hit? I also don't want to spend weeks setting the thing up.

    Suggestions? :wiggle:
     
  2. Kabuko

    Kabuko Guest

    Pretty sure the DI-604 should be able to handle more than 4 computers, if you look at the wording, it usually says "directly" connect 4 computers. You should be able to hook up a switch/hub to it and get more computers working just fine. If you're unsure, you could always search more on the D-Link site or at worst, email them and ask.
     
  3. Rob

    Rob OT Supporter

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    It will support more than 4. Like you said, just 4 directly connected.

    When you get it you can stop paying for all those IP's from your ISP too. :bigthumb"
     
  4. 04

    04 Guest

    I don't pay for the IP's from my isp. I get 3 free ones. Which is the reason I would keep my two brother's computers on their own segment of the network.

    Thanks again guys, and merry christmas!
     
  5. Rob

    Rob OT Supporter

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    If you do that keep in mind that your brothers will have to be on the other side of the router probably hooked into a different hub/switch.
     
  6. 04

    04 Guest

    Yeah I know :)
     
  7. Rob

    Rob OT Supporter

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    :bigthumb:
     
  8. Balzz

    Balzz Guest

    Get a PIX 501. You can still have only one internet-facing interface and configure the outside interface to NAT using all your real IPs, and perform stateful inspection as well.
     
  9. Balzz

    Balzz Guest

    Not if he gets a real router. :big grin:
     
  10. WannaZO6

    WannaZO6 There are 10 types of people in the world, the one

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  11. Rob

    Rob OT Supporter

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    True. True.
     
  12. reverse

    reverse hooooooooo

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    The other one says it can support 250+ connections because chances are, its a wireless access point as well.
     
  13. Dommi

    Dommi Guest

    yup
     
  14. Balzz

    Balzz Guest

    Would you put 250+ nodes on a shared ethernet segment?

    Mar-ket-ing

    *hug*

    :big grin:
     
  15. DatacomGuy

    DatacomGuy is moving to Canada

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    Stick with a major brand. Netgear, Linksys, etc.

    I've always been AGAINST Dlink/Signamax/AESP. They manufacter these lines in China in a warehouse full of people. Terrible quality. I send one return to DLink and Signamax a month. Usually a complete pallet of stuff - last month had 132 items on it.

    DLink = Not a good brand.
     
  16. 04

    04 Guest

    :( I am not surprised. What about their wireless stuff? It's supposed to support 22mbits instead of the normal 11 for its 802.11b products. Is that true, or just more marketing BS?
     
  17. 04

    04 Guest

    :(

    1. How much money?
    2. Do I have to learn Cisco's protocols, or is it more user friendly? (like browser based configuration)
     
  18. Balzz

    Balzz Guest

    Surprisingly cheap (relatively speaking); probably around $250 USD. There's a java-based GUI but it's still kinda clunky. Command-line interface is far more effective, and once you configure it once, you'll likely never have to touch it again.
     
  19. Balzz

    Balzz Guest

    It sounds good in theory but I've never used it so I can't comment. My understanding is that it uses 2 of the 3 non-overlapping channels instead of just 1. I'm not sure if it uses one channel for tx and another for rx, or if it aggregates the channels.
     
  20. Leb_CRX

    Leb_CRX OT's resident terrorist

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    if yuo have a old school pc put 2 nic cards and run XP...share the inet and make it run like a nat box...

    fuck spending money on a router man...but if you must, all you need is 1 real ip...say inet on e0, than e1 network/...cause the ones on e1 is a private network therefore use a class C 192.168.0.0 and ya...

    hope that makes sense, very tired

    |eb_CRX
     
  21. Dommi

    Dommi Guest

    the problem that I see with using seperate channels on RF for rx and tx is that you might have more latency on one channel then on the other. causing drops in the connection...
     
  22. Kabuko

    Kabuko Guest

    I've had far more problems with Linksys than DLink. Not even close in fact. People have their preferences. Go look at reviews and consumer reports if you can find them to get a better view than what any one person tells you.
     
  23. DatacomGuy

    DatacomGuy is moving to Canada

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    Could be true, but I do not put much faith in their products all together.

    Also, as Dommi mentioned, I too would be worried about latency problems.

    "Whenever it sounds too good to be true, it probably is." ;)
     
  24. Kabuko

    Kabuko Guest

    The 22Mbits is real, but in general only works with products from the same manufacturer. If you get a wireless NIC from another company it probably won't work at 22, but should work at 11 fine.

    The multiple channels is pretty standard I believe. Could be wrong though.

    Oh, and I've had no latency problems using D-Link products, just for the record. Usually a 3ms ping to the router (small network, about 5 computers usually on). I don't have the 22Mbps feature though. Just plain old 802.11b.
     
  25. Dommi

    Dommi Guest

    there are some access ponits that do have slots for two wifi cards, but those ap's are not soho and are very very expensive. Off the top of my head I remember spec'ing one of them but I do not remember the name...
    :(
     

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