99 R6 vs 03 SV650s

Discussion in 'OT Driven' started by CasualSex, Jul 20, 2006.

  1. CasualSex

    CasualSex Stan Smith

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    (CLIFFS AT THE BOTTOM)

    Hello all.

    I'm looking for a first bike, and I realize that 600SS arent generally recommended for beginners, but I have a question. First off, I'm signed up for the MSF in early August (Im very excited, but a little nervous :) ). So assuming that I pass and I feel very comfortable on the 250 in the class (By all means, after taking the class, I may end up getting a Ninja 250). But if I do feel very comfortable, I was thinking about picking up an 03 Suzuki SV650s, which although being more than 600cc, pretty newb friendly. I'm pretty sure that the 03+ SV's are fuel injected.

    A friend will be upgrading from his 99 Yamaha R6 (which I believe is carb'd). And its my understanding that FI is faster than carb'd. So a new FI r6 (03+ I think) would be significantly faster than the older carb'd R6?

    My question is, will an older carb'd R6 be that much faster than a new FI SV650s?

    The R6 is a beauty, and I can get a very good deal on it but I'm very reluctant to get in over my head with something too jumpy and powerful.


    Thanks, and sorry for the long read

    CLIFFS:

    Will an older carb'd R6 be a lot faster than a new FI SV650s?
    Too much for a fresh msf graduate/newbie?
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2006
  2. Luffy

    Luffy | Anime Crew | Gear Second |

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    you want something faster already? :hsugh:
     
  3. CasualSex

    CasualSex Stan Smith

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    I have nothing right now. I meant the 250cc bike they use for the class, I dont own one.
     
  4. Boudreaux

    Boudreaux Active Member

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    Get the sv650s, no joke, don't think, just do it...
     
  5. chakup

    chakup Guest

    who cares which is "faster" it depends on the rider. get the SV hands down. I love my R6, but the SV is an awesome all around bike and more than fast enough.
     
  6. machine81

    machine81 New Member

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    Will the R6 be faster? YES

    FI injection will make a bike faster, but only when you're comparing apples to apples. You're comparing a V-Twin Universal Japanese Motorcycle (UJM) to a I-4 sportbike. They're hardly in the same category. Assuming similar rider ability, the R6 will ALWAYS be faster (That's right OT, I'm taking a stand. Flame me if you want).

    Now, carburetion has it's disadvantages, but it's not like it's ancient technology. Some bikes are still sold with it. I think you're over analyzing some of the details.


    Too much for a noob? Maybe

    I started out on a 550cc (3 years ago) and am currently riding a 2004 SV650. Some people start out on 1000cc bikes. It's a matter of control mixed with a little luck. If you're deadset on getting one of these two bikes I'd probably steer you towards the SV.
     
  7. Buck-O

    Buck-O Guest

    Will the R6 be faster, absolutely...its a SuperSport, thats its role in life. Be fast.

    Would you have the most fun on that bike? Well, that of course is wide open for debate, but my feeling, and im sure others, will feel teh answer is no.

    For sheer fun factor, and ease of use, and enjoyment, the SV650 would offer a rider, new or old, a sence of fullfilment that a SuperSport simply couldent. The snappy torque od the V-Twin, and the solid chassis ergos would give you a very solid compitent bike, that you could enjoy for a very long time.

    Is it the bike for you? Well, thats ultimately your call. But i think starting off you will find the SV offers alot more, for alot less in every catagory. Especially insurence.
     
  8. CasualSex

    CasualSex Stan Smith

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    Thanks for all the responses. To those who asked, I was wondering how much faster the R6 was because Im hesitant of getting something way too fast/powerful/over my head.


    I will see if I can work out a deal if I can test drive my friends R6 (Im sure hell be hesitant, but probably with a deposite or something) to see how it feels. But who knows, if the 250's in the class seem just right I might end up getting a ninja 250
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2006
  9. BeachBoy

    BeachBoy New Member

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    The difference in speed between a FI and a Carb'ed for the same bike (i.e. 2002 R6 vs 2003 R6) will NEVER be seen, because it's so small that driver will make the diference.

    Only place where FI is leaps ahead is when you're in high altitude or changing altitude.. My R6 lost 15hp when moving to 5000+ ft in Reno.. Compared to sea level. The FI looses also power, but once the PCIII is set, the FI adjusts for when you move between the peaks at 10 000ft to sea level (0ft) while the Carb has a lot more trouble making power at all altitudes
     
  10. aus-juiced

    aus-juiced New Member

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    I started out on a Ninja 250. It is excellent to learn how to corner properly, chuck the bike around, etc. It has a pipe and tune and is quick without being scary, about 13.9 quarter mile ET.

    Good learner "sports" bike. :)
     
  11. Buck-O

    Buck-O Guest

    I still think one of the best beginer bikes out there, if your looking for somthing of reasonable size, is the Kawi Ninja 650R. Great all around bike. I may even get one myself.
     
  12. machine81

    machine81 New Member

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    The Ninja 650R is slightly less powerful than the SV650 and has a good torque curve as well. It would definitely be a good choice! Plus it has some wind protection to it. I prefer the riding position of my naked SV650 to the SV650S, but the lack of wind protection gets a little cumbersome at times. Definitely take a look at the Kawi.
     
  13. monkeymunzey

    monkeymunzey Guest

    weren't you going to get some sort of cruiser??
     
  14. Coddle

    Coddle New Member

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    How about a Suzuki GS500R?
     
  15. toezter

    toezter New Member

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    just to throw in my $.02, i took the MSF class in march 06. i've rode a scooter for 2 years prior.

    i really wanted both of those bikes, but settled with a good deal on a 99 katana. then few months later a driver ran into me, totaling the bike (and my knee). i kinda wished that i had spent less on a bike, but on the other hand i didn't spend an extra 2k on a R6.

    if its your first bike, i don't recommend something you like. get experienced with the road and drivers with your motorcycle.

    Cheers.
     
  16. Buck-O

    Buck-O Guest

    CRUISER?!

    Now, more tword Sport Touring, preferably a VFR, but i doubt ill be able to get the one i want. Guy has a 2002 in New Mexico for $4000. But the shipping cost makes it not worth it. Some friends of mine where going to be moving back up to WA from NM last month, and i was going to have them snag it on the way up here. But unfortunately his contract got extended, so they are staying. Any my friend who just moved to Pheonix said he might be able to pick it up, on his way back to pick up some of his shit he left behind. But he found a plane ticket for cheaper then the truck rental, so hes flying up now, and driving back. So no VFR for me.

    I like the 650R though. Very comfortable, reasonably sporty, styling is good, and a very noob friendly motor. And cheap. The downside is that i would need all new suspension. Well i would with anybike, becuase i have a very heavy frame (the lightest ive ever been, and that was with a recorded 7% body fat, was 215, now im pushing 300), but in the case of the 650, AFAIK, the only shock that fits it, is a race spec Penske. And the stock shock is fully sealed, and non-rebuildable. And Psnskes dont come cheap.

    Ive also considered the Kawi Z750S, but it felt like it weighed a ton, and the seating posision was making my pants crush my balls. The suspension was HELLA soft front and rear. But fortuantely, it has slightly more adjustable suspension, and a new rear shock doesnt cost an arm and a leg either, and the stocker is rebuildable. But the initial cost is higher.

    And of course there is ALWAYS the SV. But i cant get an S, becuase the damn tank kills my rib cage...no, its not my fat, its straight bone on metal contact. Very painful. So id have to go full naked if i where to get an SV.



    Anyway, sorry to ramble...no cruisers for me please.
     
  17. CasualSex

    CasualSex Stan Smith

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    Thanks for all the responses everyone :)

    I'm going to see if any friends have friends with a Ninja 250 to go check those out.

    I do have a follow up question about the 99 R6. Is it able to run smoothly in the lower RPMs? And I assume most of the power kicks in at the higher RPM? So if I kept the bike under 8k, It wouldnt be too jumpy?

    And its my understanding that the SV650s delivers the power more evenly and has a little more torque but doesnt fly at the high RPMs?
     
  18. machine81

    machine81 New Member

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    I've never riden an I-4, but I've riden 3 V-twins and a parallel twin. A V-twin has a very broad torque curve and power comes on in a very predictable manner. The only thing that I don't like about V-twins is the engine braking. If you let off the throttle the bike decelerates very quickly. I find this problematic when I'm in 1st gear and going over train tracks or rough pavement. You have to keep your wrist very steady. If you don't, you get a very jerky ride for a few seconds.
     
  19. Jerm

    Jerm I

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    SV, a real enjoyable bike to ride and great around town.
     
  20. rider

    rider New Member

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    As mentioned above, engine displacement does not tell the whole story. Twins usually require more displacement compared to an I4 to develop the same amount of hp (i.e. the SV develops 70hp from 645cc v. 120hp from the 599cc R6). However, the extra HP tends to come at much higher rpms for the R6, giving it a top-end rush as with other I4's. In contrast, similar to other twins, the SV will have a smaller hp amount, but is blessed with a broader torque curve that is lower in the rpm range. This makes it ideal for commuting through traffic and easier to use as you are not fishing for the correct gear and dealing with the twitchy nature of the I4 in higher rpms.

    The top-end rush characteristic of an I-4 can be somewhat eased with re-gearing. However, the rider still has to deal with the higher output of the I-4, which is something you prudently stated you wanted to avoid.

    In terms of carbed v. FI, the FI is generally more user friendly as the CPU will automatically deal with various altitudes the bike may encounter. Carbed bikes can be run in all altitudes as well, they just need to be rejetted to deal with conditions.

    One thing I didn't see mentioned is ergonomics. Ergos play an important role when it comes down to what you want to use the bike for. The SV will have a more upright position, making it more comfortable for commuting.

    In summary, the SV will be a more comfortable bike to learn on. But it's wrong to think you will be slower on the SV than the R6, even in the long run. Even though R6 offers more on paper, you may be able to utilize much more of the performance envelope on SV as opposed to the R6. It only takes a trip to the local track to see that the SV is a very capable machine in the right hands.

    I own an R6 btw.
     

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