802.11b and 802.11g cards on the same computer?

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by MUDFISH, Sep 13, 2004.

  1. MUDFISH

    MUDFISH New Member

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    OK, here is the situation: At home I have an 812.11b wireless router and wireless card setup to my laptop, and my wifes Axim palm pilot also using the same router. I have no problems here, but at work, they use a 802.22g network.

    NOW, for the question. I would like to be able to use my laptop at work, but I do not want to get a new router at home, since my wife uses it for her Axim. So, can I just get a g wireless card and install that to use at school and run then put ib the b card when I go home? I don't know if having the software for both on the computer would cause problems or not.

    I know I could just try it, but I dont want to spend the money on the g card to find it won't work.

    Any input or ideas would be appreciated.
     
  2. Penguin Man

    Penguin Man Protect Your Digital Liberties

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    Most G wireless cards are backwards compatible and can connect to a B network if I'm not mistaken.
     
  3. MUDFISH

    MUDFISH New Member

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    OK, thanks I will try that then.
     
  4. Rob

    Rob OT Supporter

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    I think they all are.
     
  5. Keyzs

    Keyzs OT Supporter

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    Yep, the standard states G is backwards campatible with B.
     
  6. Penguin Man

    Penguin Man Protect Your Digital Liberties

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    That's what I figured, but I wasn't entirely sure :)
     
  7. pookrat

    pookrat OT Supporter

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    But B support may need to be enabled in the AP or the Client software. Some are set to A G only. Also some G AP's will only work with newer B cards unless switched to B only. Just a thought.
     
  8. Keyzs

    Keyzs OT Supporter

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    Do you know this from experience? Which WAP/Router are you using? What NIC are you using?

    VERY few in any access points actually use A & G only, I could not find any. Its a foolish and expensive way to have wireless network. 802.11A uses the 5GHz band and 802.11B&G use 2.4GHz Dual Band WAP/Routers are advertised as A & G which is correct since B is part of the G standard. If the router/wap is using standards it WILL work new or old. 802.11G is 100% fully backwards capatable to 802.11B...
     
  9. cmsurfer

    cmsurfer ºllllllº

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    Just to add, I have a Belkin wireless access point at work and in the router settings, you can set the speed to 54G - Auto (G and B), 54G - ONLY (only G), and 54G - LRS (not sure what that is).

    There should not be any settings on the client regarding speed unless you had a G card and wanted to slow it down to B for some reason.
     
  10. DatacomGuy

    DatacomGuy is moving to Canada

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    Linksys and Netgear each have A+G WAP's.. Linksys WAP54GA; and I don't remember Netgear's p/n off the top of my head.
     
  11. DatacomGuy

    DatacomGuy is moving to Canada

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    And this is correct. In theory, all G WAPs and Cards are backwards compatible to B, unless it was specifically made for A+G.
     
  12. Keyzs

    Keyzs OT Supporter

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    I assume your talking the WAP55AG which is a Dual-Band Wireless A+G access point.

    From WAP55AG's online documentation:
    By default of the standard 802.11g is backwards compatible with 802.11b. 802.11 is a trademark (not sure if thats the correct term) of IEEE and to be labeled 802.11[x] it needs to follow these standards.

    So basically all G's are also B's, not all B's are G's and no G's or B's are actually A's but G and B play will with A.

    What was the original question???
     
  13. DatacomGuy

    DatacomGuy is moving to Canada

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    Yes, my mistake on the P/N.
     
  14. pookrat

    pookrat OT Supporter

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    A & G WAP's can be considered two WAP's because they would contain both an A and G radio. A is a completely different animal.

    Sorry. Let me clarify. Saying a standard is 100% backwards compatible with another standard is foolish. There will always be exceptions. Though the IEEE is there to create and ratify standards, companies are not boud to include every facet of that standard in with their equipment as long as it performes as they say it will. Yes, both 802.11g and 802.11b are using the 2.4 Ghz ISM band rahter than the 5 Ghz UNII band of 802.11a. The problem you can sometimes runinto with G is that it uses Orthogonal Frequency Division Modulation when communicating with G devices or when set to G only. It will try to switch to the Quadrature Phase Shift Keying modulation which 802.11b uses when 802.11b devices are in the mix. Every G WAP swithces to QPSK in a different way and depending on the driver and radio of the B client it may have issues with the translation. Likewise a G client may have issues with the CTS/RTS mode of the G WAP when in mixed mode. We don't even want to get into the area of G WAP's in mixed mode switching Spreading Code from Barker to CCK when dealing with B clients and the overhead that causes on top of CTS/RTS.

    Hence my suggestion.

    Sorry my job is making me get deep in to Wireless Standard and Secirity development lately. I need more coffee, my head hurts.
     
  15. Keyzs

    Keyzs OT Supporter

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    Glad you typed all that, a little worried that I understood it all. (Oh and agree!!)
     

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