802.11 a b or g?

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by mace, Feb 3, 2005.

  1. mace

    mace i don't read

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    I'm thinking about getting a notebook from dell, cuz it's cheap there. I was wondering which one I probably won't need so I can save some money on the wireless card.
     
  2. cmsurfer

    cmsurfer ºllllllº

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    I'm not really sure what 802.11a is, but just to let you know, 802.11b transmits at 11 Mbps and 802.11g up to 54 Mbps.

    Just remember that if you get a wireless G card, and do not have wireless G harware on your network like a router, you will only get the speed of B. Wireless G is backwards compatible with B, but not the other way around.

    I'd go for the G card since you will able to keep the speed up where G is supported and can also use B.

    Unless someone can comment on what 802.11a is...
     
  3. Jkuao

    Jkuao New Member

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    G = different frequency. B works at the same freq as G so if there are a lot of signals around the connection gets slowed down. Also some G router setups are slowed by a single B connection. A is as fast as G but b/c it's on a diff frequency the two generally aren't compatible.
     
  4. Penguin Man

    Penguin Man Protect Your Digital Liberties

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    :werd: G is becoming more common, so you may as well have a G card.
     
  5. mace

    mace i don't read

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    So a is pretty much unused?
     
  6. babygodzilla

    babygodzilla I love rice

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  7. pookrat

    pookrat OT Supporter

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    802.11b - Also called Wi-Fi. Operates at 1, 2, 5.5, and 11 Mbps speeds in the 2.4 GHZ Industrial Scientific Medial (ISM) Frequency Range using Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum (DSSS) Modulation with QPSK and BPSK Coding. - Backwards compatible with 802.11

    802.11a - Operates at 6, 9, 12, 18, 24, 36, 48, and 54 Mbps speeds in the 5 Ghz Unlicensed National Information Infrastructure (UNII) Frequency Range using Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) modulation. - Only compatible with other 802.11a devices due to using the UNII band and OFDM modulation. Only really used in sensitive corporate organizations.

    802.11g - Operates at the combined speeds of B and A. Uses DSSS technologyy. It uses both OFDM (for high speeds) and QPSK Modulation (for 802.11b compatibility. Also operates at 2.4 Ghz. It switches between G and B modes on the fly, although this can cause more overhead and slow thing down. It is much more common as opposed to A which makes it more desirable. Main downside is that it uses the 2.4 Ghz band which is already crwded by Cell Phones, Blutooth devices, 2 way radios, even Microwaves which makes it more susceptible to interference.


    Bottom line... Just get the G card if you don't need A for compatibility. Gives you more options if ya need them.

    Damn I'm bored. Let me know if ya have other questions.
     
  8. Zourn

    Zourn 16-bit Ninja OT Supporter

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    what everyone here said is true, but i'll also add that A has a shorter range than b or g

    Go with G
     
  9. Goonigoogoo

    Goonigoogoo Active Member

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    The only advantage that A has over b/g is its frequency, most portable phones today work on 2.4 frequency and that's where b and g reside.
     
  10. Juvenall

    Juvenall What Would Juvie Do?

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    :werd:

    I set up a pre-n here a few days ago and I can't believe how fast my connection is. A few minor bugs, but I'm happy as hell in the end.
     
  11. Penguin Man

    Penguin Man Protect Your Digital Liberties

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    Detailios on what this is? :eek3:
     
  12. Jkuao

    Jkuao New Member

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    It's the latest protocol of the 802.11 spec...802.11N to be exact. Usually paired w/ MIMO(multiple antennae) to extend range and speed. The problem arises from it's not a complete standard yet. Should be rated at 200Mbps and backwards compatible w/ a/b/g setups as well when they finish the spec.

    Getting it now, you run the risk that your hardware won't work when they release the final specifications.
     
  13. pookrat

    pookrat OT Supporter

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    The way it is going 802.11n will not be compatible with 802.11a either. The reason being is that there are two groups working on the standard. TGn Sync wanted to use 40MHz channels in the 5GHz spectrum (which would mean incompatibility with b and g but much better SnR due to the less crowded frequency range). While the other group, WWiSE, proposes using 20MHz channels in the 2.4GHz range (which would mean they can still function with b and g using mixed mode architecture). The latter would be better as far as marketability and integration into current networks. But speeds will still be very fast due to the use of the Alamouti coding and MiMo. And with the WWiSE proposal, an AP in Mixed Mode does not slow the connection of N adapters down, even though the modulation has to change from Alamouti to OFDM to Barker.

    Pre-n is whatever the manufacturer wants to use since the standard is not even close to being ratified yet. The Pre-n you see in stores today is just a hodge podge of standards and modulation working the way they think it should. Hopefully if your lucky, the manufacturers will provide a Firmware upgrade when the standard is ratified.

    Either way... Good stuff on the horizon for Wireless. Hopefully 802.11n can be ratified and the battle between WiMax and 802.16 can end. Then we'd be hooked up like a mofo!!!
     
  14. Juvenall

    Juvenall What Would Juvie Do?

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    Considering how long it took for G to fall into place, I'm not really worried about my current equipment. I normally upgrade/replace every year or two anyhow.

    ..now if we can just get that whole gigabit FTTH thing going, I'll be one happy geek.
     
  15. Goonigoogoo

    Goonigoogoo Active Member

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    Your best best for a wireless standard today is definetly G, it will work under B also, so if you do go to a hotspot(internet cafe) odds are they are working on a b/g frequency.
     
  16. Penguin Man

    Penguin Man Protect Your Digital Liberties

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    :coold: If I actually needed my wireless to be any faster, I might look into that, but as it stands, my wireless is was faster than my internet connection, so I'm happy with G (hell, I'd even be happy with B).
     
  17. TV-MA

    TV-MA Guest

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