3DMark is owned by Creative Labs? v. bullshit eula

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by Doc Brown, Dec 18, 2006.

  1. Doc Brown

    Doc Brown Don't make me make you my hobby

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    I cannot believe the eula that I just read when I was trying to install 3DMark06.
    The popup box that I got claims that it is Creative Labs which amazes me in light of the warnings.

    Creative does not warrant that the functions contained in the Software will meet your requirements or that the operation of the Software will be uninterrupted or error-free or free from malicious code. For purposes of this paragraph, "malicious code" means any program code designed to contaminate other computer programs or computer data, consume computer resources, modify, destroy, record, or transmit data, or in some other fashion usurp the normal operation of the computer, computer system, or computer network, including viruses, Trojan horses, droppers, worms, logic bombs, and the like.

    No you faggots, you are not in the clear on that.
    The feds passed a fucking law against spyware, so you are NOT EXEMPT FROM THAT! :rl:


    You have to state clearly which exploits you plan on fucking up my computer with. Cocksuckers.

    So I denied the install of the popup box and it disabled the program. :wtc:

    .
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2006
  2. 7960

    7960 New Member

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    So mail it back to them with a copy of your receipt demanding your money back.
     
  3. mdaniel

    mdaniel S is for Shiksa

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    Their lawyers put that in there so you can't sue them if they distribute a virus on their media as Apple and ECS (or some other shitty mobo maker) have done.
     
  4. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    They don't warrant that their own software is free from malicious code? What the hell kind of operation are they running?

    Good job reading the EULA. I never do; what the hell good can it do?

    Report them to the Better Business Bureau for the hell of it.
     
  5. Doc Brown

    Doc Brown Don't make me make you my hobby

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    Well I didn't have to pay for it. I downloaded the free version of it.

    From what I can tell from the different versions, there's nothing I'm interested in the pay versions that the free one doesn't have.

    Being free is probably the reason for spyware I guess.

    But it's still shitty.
    Funny thing is that I don't read all the eula's, but I just felt like reading this one.
     
  6. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

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    gezz don't be tards, it doesn't say they put in spyware for christ's sake, it's an indemnity clause incase someone slips something in they won't get sued by everyone on earth. It happens every once in a while. Apple had an incident not too long ago where a windows virus was slipped onto some of their iPods at the factory. They are just protecting their asses in case someone hacks their website and contaminate their download.
     
  7. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    All they have to do, in case there is spyware, is prove that they took reasonable measures to prevent it and that they had no intention or knowledge of it. They don't need a "we're rubber and you're glue" clause in their EULA.
     
  8. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

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    This is America, so no, that would not protect them. In the US it does not matter if they took reasonable precautions or not, they could still be sucessfully sued over it.
     
  9. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    That logic applies to physical products, like hot cups of McDonalds coffee. In case you haven't noticed, the courts tend to heavily favor the manufacturers/distributors of intellectual property in their rulings. Creative would be perfectly safe.
     
  10. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

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    Uh, no. It applies to software as well (which, technically, is a physical product). IP law does not apply in this case.
     

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