2003 Econosport Sedans Comparison Test

Discussion in 'OT Driven' started by TriShield, Aug 27, 2003.

  1. TriShield

    TriShield Super Moderator® Super Moderator

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    With their affordable sticker prices, unique styling and surprising performance, these four sedans will make you smile in more ways than one.

    By Ed Hellwig
    Date Posted 08-18-2003

    Cheap cars that go fast. That's the premise behind every car in this test. It seems simple enough, but despite the fact that such a concept spawned the entire muscle car era of the 1960s, automakers are just now "rediscovering" the idea and once again building affordable cars that deliver serious performance.

    Unlike their ancestors, these modern-day hot rods sport half the cylinders, a third less weight and sophisticated computers to keep everything in check. Based on inexpensive economy cars, they're small in stature, but big on fun.

    Just last year we conducted this test with all the major players at the time and came away impressed with just how much performance you can get for around $20,000. Nissan's Sentra SE-R Spec V took first place for its blend of sizzling performance and a rock-bottom price. Barely a year later, competition in the segment has heated up thanks to the in-house tuning divisions of Dodge, Ford and Mazda.

    Dodge's Performance Vehicle Operations (PVO) took the Neon and transformed it into a turbocharged terror renamed the SRT-4. Ford's Special Vehicle Team (SVT) added two doors to its already hot Focus coupe to create the four-door SVT Focus. And finally, Mazda's Mazdaspeed division created the Mazdaspeed Protegé complete with a turbo engine and an equally powerful sound system.

    We pitted all four against each other in a classic sport sedan showdown. Their performance aspirations demanded more than just a few runs to the grocery store, so we took them out to the Streets of Willow road course in the high desert of California for some serious flogging. Hot summer temperatures kept the cars from turning record times, but they still proved themselves worthy of their performance car status.

    In the end, one car stood out among the four as the clear-cut winner, but considering that each of the cars cost just $20,000, even the second, third and last-place finisher represents a performance bargain.

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    Fourth Place - 2003 Nissan Sentra SE-R Spec V

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    First to worst in barely a year? Is it possible? In our last econosport sedans comparison test, the SE-R took home first place with its combination of athleticism on the track, quickness off the line and a rock-bottom price. We didn't love everything about it, but compared to the other cars in the test, the SE-R put together the best combination of performance and price in a four-door sedan.

    This time around, the SE-R was still the same quick, agile and cheap sedan, yet it brought up the rear in last place. What went wrong?

    Like the Focus, there's nothing wrong with the Sentra (well, the shifter's still wrong), but faced with quicker, more refined cars that cost only slightly more, the Spec V couldn't maintain the advantage it held barely a year and a half ago. It's still a smoking deal, and its manners around the racetrack are nothing to be ashamed of, but whereas before we could excuse its minor shortcomings, there's now no room for error.

    Originally offered in the early '90s, the Sentra SE-R has undergone a few transformations before arriving in its current state. The Spec V represents its highest state of tune with exclusive features like a standard six-speed transmission, 17-inch wheels and an aggressively tuned sport suspension. The interior also gets a splash of graphics and trim, while the exterior is fitted with a deep front air dam and a rear spoiler.

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    In terms of numbers, the Sentra and the Protegé ran neck and neck in virtually every category. With 175 horsepower and 180 pound-feet of torque, the Sentra boasts impressive output from its non-turbocharged 2.5-liter four-cylinder, but the power is history after 6,000 rpm so there's lots of shifting to be done. The standard six-speed manual makes the most out of the short power band, but the shifter has a hollow, imprecise feel that makes the constant gear swapping more of a chore than it should be.

    Launching the Spec V is a no-brainer, as there's a heap of low-end torque and a standard limited-slip differential to help distribute the power. It scampered off the line to an 8-second 0-to-60 time and a quarter-mile of 16.2 seconds — a few tenths slower than the Protegé to 60, but nearly identical at the end of the quarter-mile. Wide-open acceleration runs don't do the Sentra's engine justice, however, as it's more impressive ripping around town where its ample torque and short gearing make it feel faster than it really is.

    Even the relatively tight turns of the Streets of Willow road course were too wide open, as the Sentra always felt as though it was ready for another gear no matter how fast it was going. The limited slip that helps so much off the line also works wonders blasting out of turns at speed. Unlike the SRT-4 that spins its tires uselessly out of every corner, the Sentra hooks up and takes off — at least until it needs to be shifted again.

    All SE-Rs get retuned shocks, a strut tower brace and thicker sway bars front and rear, but the Spec V steps it up a notch with even more aggressive spring and shock tuning to go along with the high-performance 17-inch tires. The stiff setup makes it a point-and-shoot proposition at the track, as there's little body roll and less tendency to plow through corners than the Focus. With no antilock brakes (they're optional), we expected lockup heading into fast corners, but it never materialized thanks to an easily modulated pedal. Minor torque steer demands a good grip on the wheel and the weighting could use some improvement, but overall it's an easy car to drive hard.

    On the street, the Spec V retains it playful feel with plenty of on-demand power and quick reflexes. The tight suspension that keeps it so well planted at the track makes for a bumpy ride at times, but it's no worse than the SRT and better than the Protegé. The sport seats are light on side bolstering but heavy on long-range comfort, so the Spec V is a legitimate daily driver.

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    With gray-accented interior trim, our SE-R's cabin did seem like it was trying as hard to look cool, compared to the bright red accents of our previous test model, but the interior still can't match the Protegé's for refinement. Materials quality is average and the controls are where you would expect them to be, but compared to the Protegé, it's a step down. Rear-seat room is negligible, and the optional Rockford Fosgate sound system adds a subwoofer that takes up half of the pass-through, so don't expect to squeeze much in the trunk, either.

    These minor annoyances aside, the SE-R is still a car worth considering if you're looking for maximum bang for the buck. Quicker around town than the Focus and more user-friendly than the Protegé, the SE-R's performance is easy to enjoy on an everyday basis. It may not have all the speed and refinement of its competition, but with a base price under $18K, it has a good excuse.

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    Ups: Rocket off the line, goes right where you point it, low sticker price.

    Downs: Clunky shifter, short gears require constant shifts, useless rear seat.

    The Bottom Line: Great low-end power and a well-tuned suspension make it a blast to drive, but faster and more refined competitors make it feel old.

    MSRP of Test Vehicle: $19,066 (including destination charge)

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    Second Opinions:

    Editor in Chief Karl Brauer says:
    As the Spec V won last year's econosport sedans comparison test, the pressure was on Nissan to maintain its position. And as we all know, one year can be an eternity in the performance car marketplace. Last time around the Sentra won with a combination of rapid acceleration, prodigious torque and effective power management (read: an available limited-slip differential). We marked off for a balky shifter, questionable interior design and no ABS (though it's available as an option).

    This time around the Sentra was exactly the same vehicle, but the competition has gotten better. The SRT-4 effectively erases the Sentra's one-time horsepower and torque advantage, and it does so with a shifter that doesn't make you grind your teeth as you swap gears. The SVT Focus (now available as a five-door) offers superior interior materials and a better design (and shifter), and the all-new Protegé power plant provides nearly identical acceleration times with far more refinement (and the Mazda's shifter is better, too). The Sentra still trumped every other competitor by including a limited-slip differential that allowed drivers to jump on the throttle earlier while exiting corners at the track. Unfortunately, the advantage of applying power earlier was largely erased by its lack of ABS, which meant braking had to begin earlier, too. If our test vehicle had included ABS, it might have pulled away from the Ford and Mazda at the track.

    As it stands, the Sentra suffers from a lack of refinement in multiple areas. The shifter, though adequate in every way, feels clunky and uncooperative. And because the car uses such short gearing you're forced to deal with it more often than in the competitors. The interior is lined with hard plastic, and even the engine — as powerful and willing as it is — doesn't have the smooth confidence displayed by every other car in the test. All the Sentra can really offer is a factory limited-slip differential and a torque-monster motor. That just isn't enough anymore.

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    Third Place - 2003 Ford SVT Focus

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    When the SVT Focus debuted a little over a year ago, it redefined how good a $20,000 performance car could be. With its dialed-in suspension, track-ready brakes and stout four-cylinder motor, it offered exceptional all-around performance while maintaining the everyday drivability of a typical economy car.

    The introduction of a four-door version this year promised all the performance and even greater functionality. With identical dimensions and minimal weight gain, there's no performance penalty, and the additional access provided by the full-size rear doors makes it easier to get the most out of its surprisingly spacious interior.

    With all that going for it, how did the SVT still only manage a third-place finish? Consider it a nod to the competition more so than a slight to the SVT. While the SVT's performance and practicality are still impressive, both the Dodge and the Mazda deliver that little extra something that makes them stand out from the crowd. There's nothing inherently wrong with the Focus, but in a category that emphasizes personality as much as performance, it's a bit of a wallflower in this group.

    Nowhere was this more apparent than at the track, where the Focus struggled to keep up with its turbocharged rivals. Its 0-to-60 time of nine seconds flat put it a full second behind the next fastest car and nearly three seconds slower than the SRT-4. A 17-second quarter-mile time was also well off the pace, but the margins were smaller toward the end so it was catching up on the high side.

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    With 170 horsepower from its 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine, the Focus has as much power as the Protegé (170 hp), and nearly as much as the Sentra (175 hp), but with only 145 pound-feet of torque, it can't match the Protegé (160 lb-ft) or the Sentra (180 lb-ft) in the twist department. This makes for slow getaways from a stop and a few more gear changes along the way, but as with most small engines, once you get used to where the power is, it becomes second nature to keep it wound up.

    The standard six-speed gearbox makes managing the power that much easier, but the shifter itself received middling marks for its ability to find gates easily. Most often cited as "rubbery" and "vague in the gates," the SVT's shifter lacks the notchy feel that makes the Protegé and Neon so confident through the gears. The rubber-ringed handle was considered better than most and the pedal placement is nearly perfect for heel-and-toe downshifting, but numerous laps on the road course left us wishing for more precise engagement.

    Even with the less-than-perfect shifter and lack of low-end grunt, the Focus still turned in some of the quickest laps on the track. Much of the credit goes to the suspension, as it allows you to push the car right up to its limit and then keep it there with only minimal corrections. The SVT has more body roll than the Protegé, better steering than the SRT and brakes that allow for lots of speed heading into corners. If there is one car in this group that would make a great driving school car, the Focus is it.

    If we had to pick one of the four as a daily driver, the Focus might get the nod there, too. The seats are supportive without getting in the way, the layout is straightforward and usable at a glance, and there's plenty of room for passengers, cargo or both. As capable as the Ford is on the track, the suspension rarely feels stiff on the street, soaking up road hazards without delivering the sharp jolts that you get in the Mazda and the Dodge. The steering can be heavy at times and the exhaust is more apparent than in your average ZX3, but on the whole, the Ford feels much less like a tuner car than its competitors.

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    Pop the rear hatch and you have an easily accessible cargo area with no nagging speaker intrusions from stereo components. Drop the rear seats and the cargo area expands to 43 cubic feet of space, more than any of the cars in the test. Flip the seats back up and rear passengers can enjoy the most head-, shoulder and legroom of any of the four cars.

    Deciding if such utility and mild manners are what you're looking for is the tough part. For some, the SVT's forgiving setup might be just the ticket. It's less likely to make you feel like you compromised comfort in the name of performance, yet when pushed hard it offers all the capability you could ask for. Novice drivers will feel like Jeff Gordon behind the wheel, while experienced pilots will marvel at the car's ability to take a thrashing.

    On the other hand, those looking for all-out speed will be disappointed by its lack of straight-line acceleration. And if it's an outgoing personality you're looking for, the Focus comes up a little short in that department, too. Disregard those categories, however, and the Focus remains a solid choice that's bound to impress you more often than it leaves you wishing for more.

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    Ups: Predictable handling makes it easy to drive fast, suspension still soft enough for daily driving, spacious interior, useful auxiliary gauges, flexible cargo space.

    Downs: Engine lacks snap, vague shifter.

    The Bottom Line: A solid, well-rounded performer that would make a great daily driver, but it lacks the speed and the styling necessary to take top honors in this group.

    MSRP of Test Vehicle: $20,755 (including destination charge)

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    Second Opinions:

    Editor in Chief Karl Brauer says:
    We were fortunate enough to have both a three-door and five-door SVT Focus during this comparison test (those SVT guys are awfully generous). While the three-door went up against a Mini Cooper S, the five-door slotted perfectly into our "sub-$20,000 performance sedan" category. You'd expect the two Foci to feel essentially identical, what with their common platform, suspension components and drivetrain. But while the three-door felt like a capable and well-rounded pocket rocket, the five-door seemed more "relaxed."

    Our sensations were backed up by the hard numbers, where the five-door model was about half a second slower to 60 mph and through the quarter-mile than its hatchback brethren. It also leaned over far enough to allow contact between the fender wells and tires when performing hot laps. Despite these issues, the ZX5 managed quicker lap times than both the three-door version and (slightly) better times than the Mazdaspeed Protegé. It lagged behind the SRT-4 and was about equal to the SE-R Spec V for lap times, but that's saying a lot considering the SVT's relatively slow acceleration figures compared to the Nissan and Dodge. Basically, the car's predictable nature, wide power band and excellent brakes made up for its lack of straight-line punch.

    Like the three-door, the five-door Focus offers exceptional utility while being easy to live with on a daily basis. It's not the flashiest or the fastest, but may be the most functional.

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    Second Place - 2003 Mazdaspeed Protegé

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    After its third-place finish in our last econosport sedan comparison test, we surmised that with a little more engine the Protegé could make a legitimate run for the top spot. Not long after that, Mazdaspeed, the Japanese company's in-house tuning arm released a turbocharged Protegé that did just that. With 30 extra horsepower and a more refined suspension package, the Mazdaspeed Protegé looked like it would finally become the class of the category.

    Unfortunately for Mazda, the Protegé ran into a brick wall on its rise to glory in the form of the Dodge SRT-4. By single-handedly recalibrating what it means to be fast in this category, the SRT made the Protegé's added dose of power seem tame. The fact that it couldn't outrun the SRT at the track, however, didn't completely dull our enthusiasm for the Protegé, as it still managed to impress with its terrific handling, quick steering and upscale interior. In fact, when it came to picking which car they would choose for themselves, the majority of our editors picked the Mazda over the SRT.

    Based on the limited-run MP3 that debuted in 2001, the Mazdaspeed Protegé builds on the MP3's upgrades with an extensive array of heavy-duty speed parts. An intercooled Garrett turbocharger boosts horsepower from a lowly 130 to a more competitive 170, while the torque rating increases to 160 lb-ft from the previous 135 lb-ft. A heavy-duty clutch disc and pressure plate relay the power through a limited-slip differential and thicker driveshafts, with 17-inch Racing Hart alloys and high-performance Bridgestone Potenza tires providing the final connection to the road.

    It adds up to a Protegé that's not only significantly quicker than the previous MP3, but one that's better equipped to handle enthusiastic driving as well. When it came to proving itself at the track, the Protegé turned in the second fastest 0-to-60-mph time with a 7.9-second run, barely edging out the Nissan Spec V (8.0), but well behind the SRT's 6.3-second time. The Mazda's best lap time of 1:26.8 was the slowest of the four cars, but it trailed the Ford and the Nissan by only a few tenths of a second.

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    Unlike most turbo power plants that lag down low and then explode with a burst of power, the Protegé's engine delivers a steady stream of thrust across a wide power band. Forget about hanging onto second to pull through long sweepers, this Protegé finally has the muscle to rip it in third. "Smooth and eager, Mazda has effectively cured the Protegé's only weakness," wrote one editor. The custom exhaust isn't as overbearing as the SRT's, but there's enough pitch change that bystanders will know that it's more than a stocker. Commentary on the shifter wasn't so kind, however, as most editors balked at the short shifter and its small aftermarket-style handle.

    Handling was never a Protegé weak spot, but Mazdaspeed's improvements ratchet up the performance yet another notch, turning this economy four-door into a serious G-machine at the track. Thicker stabilizer bars, a strut tower brace and revised Tokico shocks keep it dead flat through turns allowing you to concentrate on modulating the newfound power and maintaining a correct line. The steering remains as sharp as ever, with a slightly quicker ratio making for less wheel spinning and quicker turn-in. The traction problem that plagues the SRT is never an issue with the Protegé's standard limited slip, and although they share the same horsepower ratings, the Mazda always seems more eager to get to the redline than the Focus.

    Less radical street maneuvers are met with equal enthusiasm, as the Protegé maintains a manageable ride quality that's stiff, but rarely annoying. A few editors noted that its aggressive shock valving felt more like a homegrown street machine compared to the others, but most appreciated the Mazda's ability to supply ample feedback through the steering wheel and seats.

    High-quality materials and plenty of well-placed metallic accents earned the Mazda top marks when it came to interior design. Already considered a high-class economy sedan, the Protegé's upgrades don't seem as tacked on as the others. A thick, grippy steering wheel, well-placed Sparco pedals and easily readable gauges are just a few of the reasons cited for the Mazda's high scores. The 450-watt Kenwood MP3 audio system proved to be more aggravating than anything, as its complicated operation made simple tasks a chore. Once dialed in, however, there's some serious kick, so if a factory-installed system is a priority, this is one area where the Mazda clearly stands above the Dodge.

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    For our purposes, performance was the deciding factor when it came to the final finishing order, and for that reason, the Mazda took a distant second to the SRT entry. The added power of the Protegé's turbocharged engine is certainly a welcome improvement, but now that Dodge has reset the standards, it's time for Mazdaspeed to reassess its parameters. As an all-around vehicle that provides equal parts performance, comfort and style, the Protegé is a complete package, but with a car like the SRT occupying the same price bracket, the boys at Mazdaspeed are going to have to step it up once again.

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    Ups: Handles like it costs thousands more, precise steering, turbo lag rarely a problem, high-quality interior, powerful sound system.

    Downs: Doesn't have the power to match the SRT-4, suspension feels homegrown, stereo too complicated to be enjoyed.

    The Bottom Line: Its newfound turbo power makes this sharp handler a winner, but with the SRT-4 around, it's going to need another turbo just to keep up.

    MSRP of Test Vehicle: $20,500 (including destination charge)

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    Second Opinions:

    Editor in Chief Karl Brauer says:
    The Protegé's greatest strength lies under its hood, where the turbocharged 2.0-liter's horsepower and torque ratings fail to convey the engine's superb power delivery characteristics. At 170 horsepower, it ties the SVT for the lowest peak power output in the group, but that figure doesn't explain how readily the torque appears while essentially suffering no turbo effects. I once owned a 1989 Dodge Shelby CSX with a variable nozzle turbo design that effectively removed lag and gave the car V6-like torque right off idle. I haven't felt that kind of power delivery from any other four-cylinder engine…until now.

    Some people say turbocharging is "cheating" when it comes to performance, and the fact that Ford's SVT Focus makes the same peak number without forced induction gives some validity to the statement. But check the acceleration numbers and you see the Mazda beating the Ford by over a full second in 0-to-60-mph times. The Protegé even beat the more powerful and ultratorque-laden SE-R to 60 mph, though the Nissan managed to squeak past the Mazda by the end of the quarter-mile. And in terms of engine refinement and shifter operation, the Mazda made the Nissan feel like a classic muscle car in all the wrong ways.

    I'm not thrilled by the color choices, and the audio head unit needs a serious rethink in terms of functionality. I'd happily exchange its MP3 capabilities for traditional volume and tuning knobs. But the seats are comfortable, the steering feel is almost BMW-like and the suspension balances ride quality and handling needs better than anything else in the test. Where the Focus feels a bit tippy and the Nissan and Dodge seem unnecessarily harsh, the Protegé was "just right." The SRT-4 obviously trumps it on power, but as a more civilized alternative to the Mopar, this one makes an excellent choice.

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    First Place - 2003 Dodge SRT-4

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    If you find it hard to believe that a car originally marketed as cute and cuddly is now the most ferocious $20K sedan on the market, you're not alone. The fact that Dodge took the time to inject a little life into its nearly decade-old econocar was surprising. The fact that it wiped the pavement with several well-established competitors is nothing short of shocking.

    The abrupt transformation from homely Neon to tire-shredding SRT-4 comes courtesy of Dodge's Performance Vehicle Operations (PVO), a newly formed team of grease monkey hot rodders masquerading as upstanding corporate engineers. To them, the Neon wasn't an anemic little commuter car with cute headlights, it was a compact chassis just waiting for some serious power and the right suspension.

    Their efforts have paid off, as the SRT-4 is a compact sedan that redefines the performance envelope of its class. The competition may have nicer interiors and better stereos, but when it came to performance, the SRT-4 ruled this test.

    Like most vehicles to emerge from manufacturer speed shops, the SRT-4 benefits from a massive infusion of power thanks to a larger 2.4-liter, four-cylinder engine force-fed by a Mitsubishi-sourced turbocharger. With up to 15 pounds of boost dialed in and plenty of cool air from a seven-row intercooler, the SRT's mighty inline four comes rated from the factory at 215 horsepower and 245 pound-feet of torque. That's a full 40 horsepower more than the Sentra SE-R Spec V and a whopping 60-point spread in their respective torque numbers. As if those numbers aren't impressive enough already, Dodge will increase the stated ratings to 230 hp and 250 lb-ft of torque on 2004 models.

    Fire up the potent power plant and it roars to life with a muscular growl rarely heard from a set of stock pipes. No need to swap in new mufflers for a better sound on this puppy, it doesn't have any. At idle, the dual rear exhausts emit a mild but satisfying burble, while a smack of the throttle calls up a barely contained crackle that sounds more aftermarket than Dodge dealer.

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    Ease into first gear and the SRT feels as docile as any other Neon, with a low-effort clutch and a smooth take-up. The notchy five-speed is equally compliant, with a psuedo-chrome ball handle that's comfortable to grip, if not satisfying in its authenticity. Lay into the throttle and everything you knew about the Neon changes in an instant, as the turbo spools up to speed and unleashes a flood of power to the hopelessly overmatched front wheels.

    Under full boost, first gear disappears in a torrent of tire smoke, but the big 17-inch Michelin Pilots dig in for second and never let up from there on out. The car pulls strongly through 6,000 rpm with only a minimal drop-off in power as it approaches its 6,240-rpm redline. The only notable weak spot is the shifter, as it takes its time getting into gear, allowing the turbo to lag behind on every shift.

    Attempting to get numbers at the track was a lesson in wheelspin management. Hot temperatures and an uphill straightaway didn't help matters much, but the numbers speak for themselves. With a 0-to-60-mph time of 6.3 seconds, the Dodge was over a second-and-a-half quicker than its closest competitor, the Mazdaspeed Protegé (7.9 seconds). Its quarter-mile time of 14.9 seconds beat the Nissan's by a full second (16.2), while its quarter-mile speed of 94 mph was a full 10 ticks faster than its next closest competitor's.

    Its speed is undeniable, but there's more to the SRT-4 than just horsepower. The Neon's flabby underpinnings were ditched as well, replaced with a full complement of thicker sway bars, retuned springs and beefy four-wheel disc brakes. The transformation makes for a car that feels lighter on its feet despite the fact that the SRT-4 is actually heavier than the standard model. Ride quality has been compromised, but not by much, as it remains compliant enough for everyday driving — just don't expect to sip your morning coffee without a few tongue scaldings.

    On the tight Streets of Willow road course, the SRT was flat, fast and a cinch to place in the turns. Previous Neons had a tendency to bring the tail around when you got off the throttle, but the SRT stays put the whole way through. Its steering still can't match the Protegé for precision, and the Focus may have a slight edge in the brake feel department, but when it came to lap times, the SRT came out on top. Its time around the circuit could have been even quicker had it been equipped with a limited-slip differential ('04 models get one as standard equipment), as most of the turbo's power was wasted spinning the inside tire out of the turns.

    About the only area where the SRT-4 doesn't clean the competition's clock is in the interior department where its cheap controls and low-grade plastics reminded us of its Neon roots. There are some attempts to dress it up with fake metallic accents and some fancy gauges, but it can't match the Protegé or the Focus when it comes to overall design. There is one bright spot in the interior, however, as the SRT scored big points for its Viper-inspired sport seats with side bolsters so prominent you practically have to crawl around them just to get in.

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    A cheapo interior and an average stereo might be enough to deter some buyers, but if those factors even enter your mind you're not the kind of driver the PVO engineers had in mind anyway. This is an econosport sedan that takes the goal of maximum performance for minimum dollars very seriously, and the numbers prove it. The Protegés, Focus SVTs and Spec Vs of the world better take notice — the SRT-4 is the new king of speed on the cheap and they don't stand a chance.

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    Ups: More power than a $20K car has any business having, near perfect suspension tuning, throaty exhaust snarl, serious seat bolstering.

    Downs: Cheapo interior, Neon baggage.

    The Bottom Line: A ridiculously fast econobox with the suspension to back it up, the SRT is undeniably the most performance you can buy for $20K.

    MSRP of Test Vehicle: $19,995 (including destination charge)

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    Second Opinions:

    Editor in Chief Karl Brauer says:
    It almost seems like Dodge read our last Econosport Sedans Comparison Test and decided to one-up the Nissan's winning formula. It took a basic economy sedan and stuck in the most powerful engine it could muster. But instead of depending solely on horsepower to get the job done, the Dodge boys included a functional shifter, high-quality instrumentation and ABS as standard equipment — all while keeping the price under $20,000.

    As performance car bargains go, this one sets a new benchmark. Zero to 60 mph in less than six seconds (we only managed a 6.3, but that was uncorrected in the high-altitude desert with high temperatures), the quarter-mile in 14.9 seconds and 60-to-0-mph braking in less than 120 feet. Those acceleration figures are between one and two seconds quicker than anything else in the test which, as drag racers know, is an eternity. And the Dodge is good for more than just straightline shenanigans. Its lap times were also better than the next fastest car (SVT Focus) by more than a second. The shifter, while not as refined as the Ford's or Mazda's, is still fully functional and far better than the Nissan's. The ABS system provided exceptional stopping force with no discernable noise or vibration. Handling, always a strong point with the base Neon, was similarly up to spec with exceptional steering feedback and body roll control.

    It is often said you can't tell everything about a car by simply looking at the spec sheet. But Dodge is keenly aware that the market for these cars is ever watchful of the spec sheet, and in this area the SRT-4 simply blows the competition away. What makes the SRT-4 a winner is looking beyond the spec sheet and finding an all-around functional sport sedan with a realistic price tag.

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  2. TriShield

    TriShield Super Moderator® Super Moderator

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    Once again, the Neon ruins everybody's shit. :hs:
     
  3. Nismo4090

    Nismo4090 Back in Black

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    wow what a surprise
     
  4. Nismo4090

    Nismo4090 Back in Black

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    and who tested those cars a quadriplegic
     
  5. nucl3ar

    nucl3ar Guest

    ib it's just a Neon and other related flames
     
  6. TriShield

    TriShield Super Moderator® Super Moderator

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    Are you talking about the Neon coming in first, or the Nissan coming in last?

    :hs:
     
  7. CowboysJunkie

    CowboysJunkie Active Member

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  8. NeonWally

    NeonWally Guest

    That's a shocker :bigthumb:
     
  9. Nismo4090

    Nismo4090 Back in Black

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    The test proves what everone knows the srt4 is the only econosport car with balls. I like to think of it this way, if dodge released a car with similiar performance numbers to the srt4 except it was a smooth rwd coupe with a V6 or a V8, everyone would be on its balls, fuck I would definately have boughten one. Its only downside is fwd and interior :ugh: . Oh and the spec V is a piece Ive driven it :greddy:
     
  10. Redsky

    Redsky Beat the one you love.

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    They can't drive.
     
  11. outsidah

    outsidah Hrmmm OT Supporter

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    I'd take the SRT first followed by the Spec V personally.
     
  12. kaldurak

    kaldurak Gimme some sugar baby.

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    :mad:
     
  13. Benz

    Benz Guest

    If only the Neon wasn't plagued with problems...:sad2: but you can't get everything so I'd buy the Neon just because its CHEAP, Tha Mazda looks horrible but it has the best interior and both the Sentra and the Focus are a shame for those automakers...:ugh:
     
  14. outsidah

    outsidah Hrmmm OT Supporter

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    The Mazda looks ok, but I don't like buying a car they just slapped a turbo on... for that I'll take the NA car and turbo it myself how I please.

    The Focus is :ugh2: but the Spec-V is pretty damn nice IMO... lookwise and otherwise. I like it.. what did you think is so bad about it?
     
  15. TriShield

    TriShield Super Moderator® Super Moderator

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    I think Short Bus and HisXLNC both have Spec Vs.
     
  16. Benz

    Benz Guest

    Ford Focus:
    Downs: Engine lacks snap, vague shifter.

    put shitty interior and that the car has like 1912837465 recalls on it and then I don't see a reason to spend $2 on such car...:ugh:
     
  17. Benz

    Benz Guest

    hisxlnc has a regular sentra I think...
     
  18. Redsky

    Redsky Beat the one you love.

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    Plagued with problems? Elaborate, and be specific. :squint:
     
  19. Accords 4U2 NV

    Accords 4U2 NV OT's Resident Desi

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    no matter how much power you put in a car, nothing can make up for that.. ever ridden in a neon? :ugh: the interior just doesn't feel right..
     
  20. Benz

    Benz Guest

    Quality issues on both cars are scary ( Sentra and Focus ) I like the Focus looks ( have you seen the RS200? damn :yum: ) but the fact that it will become a fireball sooner or later scare me...

    the sentra is quite nice, fast and handles very very well but again...it has problems that you can't ignore and the 2004 Sentra looks worse than....well its horrible. :ugh: Can't wait until they make the Sentra a small Maxima :x:
     
  21. outsidah

    outsidah Hrmmm OT Supporter

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    correct
     
  22. iZero

    iZero Guest

    The Spec V is still the only one which won't cost you $20,000+. It's $17,000 before rebates, which certainly exsist. Again, it's got the best suspension and an LSD for that price. The Protege and Focus simply cost too much IMO. I would feel like a dickhead paying $20,000 for an economy car.

    Of course the Neon is the fastest currently. That's not a big shock. I'd still question how reliable and durable a Neon would be. The extreme cost cutting evident all around also makes a cheap car feel extremely cheap. If they cut corners in the places you see, what do you think they did in the places you can't see. Again, where's the LSD, where's the suspension, etc. It's got the engine, but it's in an unremarkable car. I keep thinking that for less than $3,000 more I could get an Altima 3.5 SE which would match its straight line speed while offering loads more of refinement and space. I think people get hung up on that $20,000 figure. If the SRT-4 can be compared to cars costing $3,000 less, why can't it be compared to cars costing $3,000 more?
     
  23. outsidah

    outsidah Hrmmm OT Supporter

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    Yeah, Ford likes to keep us far far away some of their more impressive cars.

    What major problems has the Sentra had? It had a recall on I dont remember what that caused it to burn oil I believe but I havent heard anything else really earth shattering though. oh and on the 2003 Setra what can I say but :rofl: Call it the TOOTH
     
  24. Benz

    Benz Guest


    First SRT-4s liked to blow head gaskets and some had some tranny problems...fixed now that they are using metal composite gaskets :bigok: and the Neon is well known to be quite unreliable..the Mazda on the other side is very strong but lacks of personality...
     
  25. Benz

    Benz Guest

    Agreed 100% but the Sentra is not much better...:sad2: The Sentra interior is a million times better tho...
     

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