2000 Jetta Motor info

Discussion in 'OT Driven' started by Isamu, Sep 8, 2006.

  1. Isamu

    Isamu New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2005
    Messages:
    1,804
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Freezin's the reason
    looking for info on the 2.0l Jetta motor.. Does it take well to boost.. should i swap it for the 1.8t?
    Anyone build one up to recieve boost? stroke it?
     
  2. TigreTek

    TigreTek omega member OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2001
    Messages:
    26,927
    Likes Received:
    3
    isn't that the 8 valve?

    www.vwvortex.com
     
  3. xxpanipuri

    xxpanipuri Gideeyup Motherfuckers....

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2000
    Messages:
    5,731
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Silicon Valley, CA
    y swap y not just sell the car and buy a 1.8 turbo

    my wife's jetta has the 2.0

    that fuckin thing burns oil like nobody's business!
     
  4. Chris87

    Chris87 flatoutperformance.com

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2001
    Messages:
    12,200
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Edmonton, AB
    Don't even bother modding the 2.slo engine.

    If you're looking for something faster, seriously - just trade in your car and buy a 1.8T.
     
  5. Chris87

    Chris87 flatoutperformance.com

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2001
    Messages:
    12,200
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Edmonton, AB
    Upside down piston rings..... Seriously.
     
  6. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    19,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    Turboing the 2.0 is a bad idea. It's not built like the 1.8t is, and it can't handle the extra stress nearly as well. Remember that the 1.8t has been around for years and years as mostly the same engine that it is now; it's been polished to perfection, or as close to it as possible. There's just no point in trying to reinvent the 1.8t all by yourself.

    Definitely trade in for a Jetta with a 1.8t. It's much, much easier than swapping out the engine. Try to get one with an AEB engine code; the turbo system is half as complicated as the newer models, and it works 95% as well.

    VW reached the limit of the 1.8t with the early-2000's cars; the law of diminishing returns made the extra parts they added to get that last little bit of performance not work nearly as well as they should have, and it's more shit to break at any rate. That's why they redesigned all of their engines for their latest rollout of new cars.
     
  7. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    19,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    I know it's a Passat 1.8t engine code. It didn't occur to me that the Jettas would have different 1.8t engine codes if the engine internals are the same.
     
  8. OniMinion

    OniMinion ...recalls when this forum was actually about cars OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2005
    Messages:
    4,894
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Indiana/Minnesota
    The 2.0L is a very reliable engine, but just like its sister 1.8T it requires 0w40 MOBILE ONE SYNTHETIC OIL ONLY! If you run that oil, it will NOT burn oil. It's not uncommon for me to get to 4000 miles without more than a 1/2quart missing on the stick. The 1.8T requires this oil as well, because without it the Turbo's have been proven to burn out due to sludge deposits.

    -Oni-
     
  9. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    19,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    The manual that came with my 1.8t says to use 5-weight oil. I doubt 0-weight could hold up to the heat of the turbo's thrust bearing.

    That said, I only use Mobil 1.
     
  10. OniMinion

    OniMinion ...recalls when this forum was actually about cars OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2005
    Messages:
    4,894
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Indiana/Minnesota
    Ok, you looking at the START UP WEIGHT of the oil. Assuming you're nice to your alluminum Alloy engine, and not starting it and then driving seconds later. You'd realize that the 0-40W ends up a a 40 weight within a minute of the engine running, unless it's 20 below, like here in minnesota, that said, in that situation you'd find that you need to wait a little longer. the 0 weight allows the oil to get to the top of the crankcase faster, so smoother start up! the 40 weight is where it sits while driving, which is thick as hell.
     
  11. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    19,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    The second number reflects the burn temperature of the oil, not its thickness when hot. The two are not necessarily related, especially with regards to synthetic oil.

    I understand your point about using the thinner oil in a cold climate, though.
     
  12. OniMinion

    OniMinion ...recalls when this forum was actually about cars OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2005
    Messages:
    4,894
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Indiana/Minnesota
    Look up what Viscosity means.
     
  13. yo vanilla

    yo vanilla New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2005
    Messages:
    250
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    appleton, wi
    yeah, you are looking at more cost than benefit in swapping something into the car, when you can just go out and buy it
     
  14. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    19,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    I know what viscosity means. I looked up what SAE oil ratings mean, and now I'm confused.

    As I expected, the lower number is the oil's SAE weight when it's cold (presumably 0 degrees Celsius), but I'm having a hard time understanding the second number in light of what I've read. The second number is supposedly the oil's SAE weight when it's hot, but if I have a bottle of 5W30 oil, how can its viscosity possibly increase when it gets hot?

    Are we talking about relative viscosity here? I know for a fact that all oil gets thinner when it gets hot, but I suppose it could be that 5W30 oil doesn't get as thin as "normal" 5W oil does when it gets hot.

    Is that how it works? The second number indicates the oil's hot viscosity as compared to standard-weight oils when they are also hot? If that's the case, then what kind of oil does the SAE use to establish their hot vs. cold viscosity standards?
     
  15. OniMinion

    OniMinion ...recalls when this forum was actually about cars OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2005
    Messages:
    4,894
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Indiana/Minnesota
    I used to work for a major oil company (*cough* Ashland *cough*) and I didn't understand it till I reviewed the MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheets) at work. Multi-viscosity litterally means multiple-thickness... Case in point being; as the temperature of the engine increases, the oil gets thicker to counter the heat THINNING it! It needs to be thicker in order to stick to the cyllinders, as well to help from burning. Racing oil, therefore, is usually a 20w50. The reason? The twenty at startup isn't as important as the 50 when at extremly high RPM's. This counters any scortching, or friction that may occur at their extermly high temperatures.
     
  16. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    19,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm sorry, but I just don't believe that the oil gets thicker when it gets hot. I've changed my own oil before, both hot and cold, and my 5W30 is most definitely thinner when it's hot. I can accept that it's as thick as cold 5W when it's cold, and as thick as hot 30W when it's hot, but I cannot accept that it's as thick as cold 30W when it's hot. It runs contrary to everything I know about oil.

    Where can I find one of those Material Safety Data Sheets? I need to read about this straight from the source.
     
  17. OniMinion

    OniMinion ...recalls when this forum was actually about cars OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2005
    Messages:
    4,894
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Indiana/Minnesota
    MSDS are required to be held at ANY gas station, quick lube etc... they are required to provide them to any customer whom requests them. They might look at you weird when you do ask, cause it never happens... it actually show you the reezing point of a particular oil, boil point, what to do if you ingest it - everything.
     
  18. Isamu

    Isamu New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2005
    Messages:
    1,804
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Freezin's the reason
    MSDS ftmfw!
    we have all kinds of cool chemicals in our MSDS.. but anyway..

    perhaps then trading the car in is the easiest route, but i am not one to do things the easy way..but then again, i am not so familar with German engineering.. through me a japanese motor and we can play ball :eek3:

    thanks guys.
     
  19. Bassheadjazz03

    Bassheadjazz03 OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2004
    Messages:
    20,355
    Likes Received:
    25
    Location:
    ATL
    Its the passat engine code of the 1999 year model only.
     

Share This Page