04 acura TL 6 speed or 04 maxima 6 speed

Discussion in 'OT Driven' started by Mantis, Dec 17, 2003.

  1. Mantis

    Mantis Guest

    which is the better car? i think these two cars are very comparable both being near luxury "sport" sedans with FWD, solid V6's and a 6 speed gearbox. i'm really diggin the new TL's. the maxima, although not quite the sports sedan it used to be is still pretty nice. what does OT think about this comparo?
     
  2. mzmtg

    mzmtg New Member

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    Neither, G35 sedan 6-speed >>>>>> both of those.
     
  3. Dibblev1.0

    Dibblev1.0 Guest

    Honda no good.
     
  4. Chinisimo

    Chinisimo Guest

    TL >>>> all
     
  5. Mantis

    Mantis Guest

    eh, i don't really care for the G35 sedan, the coupe on the other hand :bigthumb:
     
  6. sduquette

    sduquette Guest

    I've driven the TL and the Maxima, and although I really like nissans, the TL is a great buy for the $$$. It has a lot of standard features, looks slick, and runs pretty damn good.
     
  7. Johnny*MacBlayze

    Johnny*MacBlayze wassup? shut up!

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  8. AsianRage

    AsianRage Know about Media Ventures?

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    Ummmm

    Maxima = Skyview. Fake suede that fades after 5 rubs. Torquey engine. Spartan interior. More apparent plastics that doesn't impress.
    TL = More luxurious interior with REAL aluminum trim center console. Awesome audio system. Less torquey, yet still smooth engine.

    MMMMMMMmmmmm.....
     
  9. 900stunna

    900stunna Guest

    Anything made by Honda requires a crooked visor and baggy pants to drive, so you better save up for a LL Cool J wardrobe before you purchase.
     
  10. AsianRage

    AsianRage Know about Media Ventures?

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    and your name is *stunna <---- :ugh:
     
  11. 900stunna

    900stunna Guest

    Stunna = mile long highchair wheelies

    You = slow fart canned import owner
     
  12. Homan

    Homan Unconquerable OT Supporter

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    the TL is very nice
     
  13. hi_jinx

    hi_jinx Guest

    I own a 2002 Maxima SE. I love my car, but I would go with the new TL. Slightly better build quality, and more exclusive. I see Maximas everywhere I go, but the new TL is somewhat rare.

    Have you considered a BMW 3-series? If not, I highly recommend you take a look. Far superior to both the Nissan and Honda, IMO.
     
  14. sduquette

    sduquette Guest

    Ohh yeah, take it from a guy who;s lost his ass on many Nissans, they resale stinks compared to Acura.
     
  15. carabuser

    carabuser Guest

    New Maxima - buffed up Altima. I own a 2k Max, love it. But probably won't ever get a new Nissan, cuz as was mentioned before, resale sucks plus Nissan service is far away from good. So if you want a Maxima look at 2k2-2k3 6spd. If I'm not mistaken TL is made in the US too, so try to pass on that one. G35 looks very nice, perfoms even better. Test drive all of the cars, plus something else, not in the class, see what you like better.
     
  16. 900stunna

    900stunna Guest


    Let's do the math here shall we?

    TL6 = Acura
    Acura = Honda
    Honda = Shit.

    There's your answer folks.
     
  17. AsianRage

    AsianRage Know about Media Ventures?

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    I = owning an IMPORT? :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:
     
  18. gdawg

    gdawg New Member

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    I tried both cars and ended up with an 04 Maxima.. They are both great cars but I am a dedicated maxima driver so I bought another one. Do I regret it.. Absolutely not. The power from the engine is worth it to me all by itself. The interior is inferior to acura but I dont't know the acura looks a little bland to me. The Maxima did also but after painting the grill and a set of eibachs and some tint, it is one sexy car. Good luck with your purchase as they are both awesome cars.. Only regret was not getting the burnt orange seats with the buckets in the rear.
     
  19. sduquette

    sduquette Guest


    Hmmmm, Honda/Acura doesn't look like shit on this list, and just about every other list

    http://autos.yahoo.com/consumerreports/usedpicks.html
     
  20. 900stunna

    900stunna Guest

    All written by slant eyed gooks looking to 1-up the Man, if this wasn't the fact, all you import fags goals in life wouldn't be to spank a stock Z28 or Vette!
     
  21. sduquette

    sduquette Guest

    You make it sound like a z28 or a vette are something special?? They are low budget american crap. hell, why waste money on those, a cavalier is a 2 door chevy and like $11k or something, only thing different is the engine, everything else is the same low budget, low quality, poorly built crap. 2 days in a z06 and I was ready to barf, who needs a radio when you can listen to all the squeaks and rattles and whistles. Hell, my 2003 GMC broke down at 600 miles, my mother in law just traded in her 2001 Denali with 48k miles because the thing was about to fall apart, didn't stop, barely ran, and was garbage overall. There are very few top end American cars I can't afford, but let, I chose to drive low end imports, why is that? There is more quality materials in a $14k civic than a $50k corvette, and guess what in 10 years, they will be worth the same. I've driven just about every american car, and frankly, there is nothing that is worth putting money into, well, a big maybe on the viper, since they seem to hold something of a value. Keep driving you poorly built trailer taxis, and I will keep driving Lexus and BMW, and be perfectly happy that they are great all around cars. REMEMBER, a fast piece of shit is still a piece of shit.
     
  22. Mantis

    Mantis Guest


    :rolleyes:

    you may want to read this article taken from forbes. i've kindly bolded the points you may find interesting. this article makes your claim that the japenese cars are trying to "1-up the Man" redundant. it's the complete opposite. you are such a child. enjoy!

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Detroit is waving the white flag and handing over engineering to foreign partners.

    By the time the model T celebrates its centenary in 2008, Ford Motor will have mostly given up on the American car. Oh, it will still design their bodies and assemble and sell them. But it will be foreign engineers who will design the guts of the machines--the suspension, underbody and mechanical gear that determine how a car handles. For instance, Ford's new high-end family car that debuts in two years, called the 500, will be, beneath the metal, in large part a modified Swedish Volvo S80. The same goes for Chrysler . Nearly all its lineup will consist of foreign vehicles with American skins attached. At General Motors about half the cars will be engineered abroad. By comparison, foreign-engineered cars make up less than 20% of the models the Big Three have on sale today.

    Why is Detroit throwing in the towel? Because its engineers have gotten killed in the past two decades by their overseas competitors. And because it's one more way to cut costs. Thanks to the many foreign auto alliances they have made over the last decade, the domestics now can tap the very engineering expertise that laid them low. The idea: Reduce enormous U.S. development costs and create a generation of American-badged cars that are engineered abroad--and drive like imports. The shells, what you "see, feel and touch," in the words of Chrysler vice president Richard Schaum, will be American-designed.

    The savings should be huge--maybe enough to finally start justifying those costly foreign acquisitions. Christopher Cedergren, head of Los Angeles auto consultancy Nextrend, estimates it costs a U.S. automaker $1.2 billion to develop a new midsize car. But if the automaker builds it off of somebody else's underbody, the development cost is halved, to an estimated $600 million. So Ford's new 500 line by itself could eventually recoup 10% of the $6 billion Ford paid to acquire Volvo's passenger car line in 2000.

    Chrysler says the sharing plan is helping cut its five-year capital budget from $42 billion to $30 billion even as it adds five new models of cars and trucks. GM expects to save $500 million in engineering costs by building the Chevy Malibu atop a rejiggered European underbody.

    Imports like the Honda Accord and Toyota Camry have been clobbering Detroit in cars for years. This year for the first time Detroit's American brands, like Chevrolet and Ford, are selling fewer cars than the import nameplates. That 49% market share is down from 75% 20 years ago, an annual loss to Detroit of more than 2 million cars, or $50 billion in revenue. The last American hit was the 1986 Ford Taurus, and before that you have to go back to 1978 to find another, the Oldsmobile Cutlass.

    Of course we're only talking about half of Detroit's business, the vehicles called "cars." The other half of passenger vehicles is "light trucks," or sport utility vehicles, minivans and pickups. Trucks are still very American. The distinction is somewhat arbitrary; all these are primarily used as passenger vehicles. Last year Detroit rolled out exactly one new car, Ford's niche-market Thunderbird, while unveiling seven new SUVs. Light trucks make up 75% of Chrysler's unit sales, 56% of Ford's and 50% of GM's.

    In the car-half of the vehicle market, American offerings have only two strong selling points: price and patriotism. So the Big Three have decided that if you can't beat them, you should join them. The next generation of American cars should boast the tight-and-sharp handling that now characterizes Japanese and European cars.

    Chrysler (German-owned since 1998) will give its Crossfire coupe a 40% parts overlap with Mercedes and will even build the car in Germany. It will also borrow heavily from Mercedes for its Concorde and 300M luxury-car replacements, due mid-decade. Among other components, the cars will use a Mercedes transmission.

    DaimlerChrysler acquired a 34% stake in Mitsubishi for $2 billion in 2000. Here's the payoff: Chrysler's 2004 and 2005 small and midsize Neon and Stratus successors will roll on the same Mitsubishi underbodies that will be used for Mitsubishi's next generation of Lancers and Galants. The Neon and Stratus replacements will share as much as 65% of their parts with the equivalent Mitsubishis--engines, suspensions, transmissions and underbodies.

    Similarly, Ford plans to base its replacement for the bread-and-butter Taurus, due in a few years, on a variation of a Mazda underbody, according to industry gossip. Ford owns 33% of the Japanese firm. Already, Ford's subcompact Focus is completely designed and engineered in Europe. Once the Focus, new Taurus and 500 are all out, only relatively low-volume Ford models like the Mustang, Crown Victoria and Lincoln will stay American-engineered.

    At GM, which remains more reliant on cars and has many more models and brands, the exporting of engineering is only somewhat less extreme. The company's Saturn midsize sedan is engineered by GM's German affiliate Opel, its Pontiac Vibe compact by Toyota, and next year's Pontiac GTO by Australian affiliate Holden. GM has also announced plans to replace its family cars, the Chevy Malibu and Pontiac Grand Am, with cars engineered in large part by European affiliates Opel and Saab.

    GM will keep some of its larger cars on American underbodies, such as the Pontiac Grand Prix and Buick Park Avenue. Its foreign partners just don't build things that big.

    Detroit is being careful to avoid a mistake it made once before. These new cross-engineered cars won't be "world cars"--a single model with identical styling for all markets. In the early 1990s Ford came to rue its $6 billion gamble on that idea with its Mondeo/Contour lookalike car for all markets. A high-tech compact, it sold well in Europe but flopped in the U.S. because of its small size and high price.

    The thinking now is to keep the styling of each model different. The Ford 500 won't look at all like its Volvo counterpart and will have a different engine.

    Still, there's a danger to carmakers of blurring brands if their cars share too many components. Would you be so quick to buy a Volvo, for instance, knowing the new Ford 500 contains many of the same features? The risk of cheapening the Mercedes brand by having its components in Chryslers is also real. Ford may have taken a misstep with its lower-priced Jaguar S-Type, the first all-new Jaguar sedan under Ford ownership. Going in reverse, Ford engineered the S-Type off a Lincoln underbody, and the car has received a lukewarm reception.

    Will any of this get Americans to buy Big Three cars? It would certainly help if styling got better, too. But until that question is answered, Detroit will at least be saving a bundle.

    Forbes
     
  23. sduquette

    sduquette Guest

    Not to mention, Toyota just 1-up'd the Ford man this year in sales
     
  24. HisXLNC

    HisXLNC ๑۩۞۩๑ Hot ๑۩۞۩๑

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  25. Mantis

    Mantis Guest


    hey look. it's darth vader's car. :rofl:

    i like those wheels however.
     

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